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terry_g
05-09-2010, 11:31 AM
I was just given this book it used to belong to my Grand Father.
Other than a some damage to the cover its in great condition.
Around 1200 pages a wealth of information copyright date 1946.
My new bedside reader.

Terry

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lynnl
05-09-2010, 01:24 PM
What sort of information?
Is it mostly facts and tables and specs, similar to Machinery's Handbook?
Or projects, tips, how-to's, etc.
...'er what?

lane
05-09-2010, 02:19 PM
Very good book . Had mine for years . 1942 version .Some very good info . especially on horizontal milling and gear cutting.

huntinguy
05-09-2010, 04:31 PM
What sort of information?
Is it mostly facts and tables and specs, similar to Machinery's Handbook?
Or projects, tips, how-to's, etc.
...'er what?

Don't remember the vintage on mine... But I would call it a good primmer on machining. I really liked the sections on layout and tool and die work. There are tables and trouble shooting sections in each chapter. The book is written in a conversational ask-answer style. It is not a Machinery's Handbook by an means.

Your Old Dog
05-09-2010, 05:11 PM
Most of my machines are old enough to be in old books like this. I have two copies of the book, one in the cabinet in the john and one in the shop. They can be had pretty cheap on ebay. Unless you got new machines, I'd reccomend the book to anyone interested in machining arts.

knedvecki
05-09-2010, 05:47 PM
As they say,"It's all in your head". After you read this book a lot more of it will be, (that is, How to do machining set-ups)

lazlo
05-09-2010, 06:29 PM
I bought a copy after someone here recommended it -- one of the best shop texts I've seen. Somewhat like a cross between Robert Smith's Advanced Machine Work (where he gives formulas/processes for making various tools) and Machinery's Handbook.

darryl
05-09-2010, 06:53 PM
Here's one given to me recently by a friend. I learned something in the first few minutes of reading.

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Fasttrack
05-09-2010, 06:54 PM
I have a modern version of Audel's Millwrights and Mechanics Handbook. I originally stumbled into the book when I was in fourth or fifth grade and obsessed with go-karts. It taught me practically everything I know about chains, sprockets, belts and pulleys ;) :D

Then the local library put the book into reference and I never saw it again. Just last year I found a new edition that was available so I bought it. It is more of a bed-side reader than Machinery's Handbook. It has some tables/data etc, but it also has tips and information. Very good read.

Nice score, Terry! I'd like to pick up the Machinist and Toolmakers text sometime...

Dr Stan
05-09-2010, 07:16 PM
The Audels' series is an excellent line of technical books. I used the Millwright's book as the text in a college level class in which we covered pipe, valves, fittings, fluid power, mechanical transmission of power, etc. Far superior to anything written as a textbook.

The line is owned by Willey Publishing. If you go to their home page http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/ and search for audels you will find links to all 47 of their technical books.

John Stevenson
05-09-2010, 08:00 PM
http://www.steammechanic.net/Files_Books.html

Good site for a load of books.

.

wierdscience
05-09-2010, 09:07 PM
I have the same exact book.Excellent text for the beginner and the pro.I wonder if the still hold the rights to it?

DFMiller
05-20-2010, 04:27 PM
Thanks for suggesting that book. I just got mine delivered today. Found it used on Amazon. The copy I got is in almost new condition. I will enjoy learning a whole bunch of stuff.
Dave