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HAP
05-16-2010, 08:04 PM
Does anyone have an opinion on the subject? I have a cheap Blackstone model and I find myself struggling to see the weld puddle at the lightest setting (9). Its a few years old. Thought I would try this model OPTREL K6803 ( E680 ). Thoughts??

Thanks,
HAP

Black_Moons
05-16-2010, 08:14 PM
HAP: what current and process are you welding with?
What consumable are you using?
Have you tryed wipeing off the front of the lense? it often gets covered in smoke, especialy with flux core mig welding.

airsmith282
05-16-2010, 08:19 PM
i like my lincoln 100% solar ,but i adore my miller elite

Bill Pace
05-16-2010, 08:32 PM
I have the same - or similar - problem... but I have pretty well determined that my 70 yr old eyeballs are the culprit. I have 3 friends in the same general age group and they are also having a similar problem -- one told me recently he had gotten to where he wouldnt even attempt to weld anymore because he just made a mess:mad: After my last few attempts, I may have to give it up also.

This getting old SUCKS

Rookie machinist
05-16-2010, 08:32 PM
I have had my Optrel for over 7 years now and it has worked great. Had to buy a new one about 3 years ago when my old one dropped several stories and broke. Other than that no problems. There are a few other members here that also use the Optrel and will reccomend them.

BigMike782
05-16-2010, 08:48 PM
My main and favorite helmet is a Huntsman 951P with an 1100IVXL lens.I recently aquired a Miller Elite and like it a lot.

What ever helmet you get make sure you can get replacment lenses easily.

HSS
05-16-2010, 08:55 PM
If you are wire welding, try shining a quartz light onto the area you are welding. That will help those 70 year old peepers quite a bit to see the weld. Mine aren't but 60 but it sure is hard to see the weld joint thru an autodarkening hood without the extra light. JMHO

Patrick

Carld
05-16-2010, 09:40 PM
After years of using a standard lens hood I bought a HF auto dark hood and I like it. I don't weld enough to pay for an expensive one.

I have found that a spot light on the work where I am welding does wonders for seeing what I am doing. Normal shop lighting is not enough for anyone, young or old.

murph64
05-16-2010, 10:12 PM
I have a Speedglas that's been great for the couple of years I've had it...Provided I don't forget to turn it on. :blackeye: :)


Andy

Bill Pace
05-16-2010, 10:45 PM
try shining a quartz light onto the area you are welding.



I have found that a spot light on the work where I am welding does wonders

I have tried this extra light with my HF hood (not with Quartz) and have a problem with the added light making the hood darken prematurely. Either of you had that problem - do you position the added light over your shoulder or something - or (probably the case!) is my hood just too sensitive? I am gas wire welding...

I have tried 2-3 other hoods and still had problems following the bead, though not with extra light...

TDmaker01
05-16-2010, 10:51 PM
I have a blackstone one aswell and love it, I find a good cleaning does wonders with this mask and the .$45 clear lens for it makes it almost cheaper to change the lens than clean it. If I were to go and buy a new helmet right now it would be one of the 3M ones with the air filtration for breathing or the Optrel

Bob Ford
05-16-2010, 10:59 PM
Bill
To help see the weld edge, go to a stationary store and buy a silver lead pencil.
Put a line beside the weld with the pencil. When you strike the ark the line looks like a mirror.

Bob

MTNGUN
05-17-2010, 12:04 AM
I chose the Northern Tool AD helmet because it had good reviews and a large window.

The large window helps me when I am wearing bifocals and have to cock my head to get the workpiece in focus. That can be an issue with the standard size window.

Only complaint about the NT is the headgear friction never seems just right. It either falls down when I don't want it too or else it won't fall down when I want it to. I gave up on the friction adjustment and just leave the helmet down all the time. :)

macona
05-17-2010, 12:32 AM
The optrel helmet is one of the best out there. Worth the price.

MuellerNick
05-17-2010, 03:25 AM
I had a autodarkening helmet with a Kemper module (Swiss made). Then I decided to buy a Speedglas (3 months ago).
The difference was like night and day. Speedglass also offers manification lenses that clip inside of the helmet. Speedglas are not cheap, but they are perfect.

Having a good light is essential. Preferably no light from the back (or a hood over your helmet that prevents light coming in from the back). A realy strong light (500W quarz) also makes a big difference.


Nick

winchman
05-17-2010, 04:50 AM
I like my Miller Big Window Elite. My friend is happy with his big window helmet from Northern Tool.

small.planes
05-17-2010, 05:14 AM
You guys know there is a Welding sub forum (http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/forumdisplay.php?f=7) dont you?

I know there is info in there about this, cos I contributed.

Speedglas helmet for me. 9100XX, with the super large window :)

Dave

oldtiffie
05-17-2010, 06:23 AM
I have the same - or similar - problem... but I have pretty well determined that my 70 yr old eyeballs are the culprit. I have 3 friends in the same general age group and they are also having a similar problem -- one told me recently he had gotten to where he wouldnt even attempt to weld anymore because he just made a mess:mad: After my last few attempts, I may have to give it up also.

This getting old SUCKS


Bill.

I am 73 so my eyes are older than yours. One of mine was damaged because of a road accident. I can't read or drive without glasses.

I had much the same problems with seeing when electric welding - "stick" and MIG.

I had a discussion about it with my Optometrist. He said that most people really need a special set of glasses for welding as in many or most cases people have the job at a different distance than they use when reading. Same applies in some cases when using a computer. He also said that using bi-focals was a waste of time as the light is "splashed" if it hits the junction/step between the normal/longer distance and the reading lens. It is more likely that when welding you will be looking "square on" from your face to the job and are using your longer distance lens. Using the lower or reading lens is uncomfortable and requires the head to be tilted back.

All of that - for me - was just as he said.

So, when I am welding I use my reading glasses and have my head "square on" to the job and at the best focal distance of/for my glasses - which up to a point works very well.

I also notices that if the glass/lens on my welding helmet was not "square on" as well that I could get two over-lapping images of the job. It was caused by one image being reflected from the front of the lens and the other from the back of the lens. They merged into one if I was "square on". The image was quite sharp when I was in the focal range of my glasses.

The next thing was cleaning of my glasses and the front and back of the welding helmet lens as well as getting rid of any condensation caused by my breathing. That was all taken care of by a liquid in an aerosol spray can from my local welding supplier. Costs very little and my glasses and the helmet get a go with it before welding - and during it if and as required.I keep three cans of it - one in the shop, one inside the house for glasses and lenses etc. and one as a spare.

I have had about six welding helmets - cheap > expensive and "solar" and battery-powered. The best - far and away - is my "Uni-MIG" - made in Italy - same as my MIG welder. It really does work well and I can see my arc, wire, work and the MIG weld very clearly.

I was having a bit of trouble with my welder as it was sometimes spasmodic where the arc would fart and splutter or just "go out". It was a PITA to find but it turned out to be the inner wire guide on my "stinger" as just too short to constantly contact and fit neatly into the copper guide at the "gun" end. I replaced the wire core and all was pretty well OK. Next was a problem with the "Go/Power" switch that is hand-operated in the gun. I fixed that too. So the wire feed and the arc are OK.

I am very careful that my earth lead is 100% as regards nicks and broken wire strands as well as connections at the welder and the earth-clamp (job end). If it is faulty or suspect - out it goes and a new one is fitted.

Good earthing is absolutely essential. I grind every face that I will be welding to - no rust no mill-scale or paint or other crap either.

I grind the earthing points on the job and keep them as close to the welding area as I can. I never "earth" the job via an earth connection to a welding table or jig or fixture as there is too much chance of unwanted resistance in the circuit as which lowers the "Open Circuit" voltage (OCV).

I have my OCV as high as I can get it for the job in hand as it stablises the arc and improves the weld fusion and bead. It will make up for any minor losses due to poor connections.

I use a "Universal" gas - 75/25 - and it works very well for me. I set my gas flow rate toward the higher end of the recommended range.

I clean all the weld spatter off my "gun" regularly.

I have the copper weld-wire nozzle set back about 1/8" behind the shroud.

I have my gas set to come on before the wire feeds and to continue after the wire stops.

I use a 0.80mm (0.032") wire and rarely exceed the 50% point on my 240Amp welder - I usually have it set at 25>40% (60>100A) so that the machine is always well inside its duty cycle.

I snip the "ball-end" of the wire back to the nozzle before I start each welding work. If the time between welds is too long I "blip" the gun to make sure that my shroud id full of gas and that I have gas on the job before the arc starts.

I keep my shroud back about 20>25mm (3/4">1") from the job and work toward where I am looking so that I can see the arc, the wire and the weld fusion.

I do find that I can see better in natural day-light but the only supplementary lighting I use is the over-head florescent lighting in the shop. Any other is either more a hindrance than a help so I rarely use it.

Gas flow is important to me as it is too low, the "cloud" cover is inadequate and if it is too high it can drag air into the weld area.

The wind and breezes are a PITA when welding outside the shop - either under the car-port or out on the gravel drive so I use screens as required.

Both the wire-feed rollers on my machine are gear-driven and so one is not driven by the other.

I set my wire feed roller tension so that it is just above slipping and that I get a positive feed - although if I foul up the wire at the gun end I wind up with a "birds nest" tangle at the feeder which is a PITA too. That is usually caused by having my arc length too short.

I have found that having too sharp a radius or "bend" in the gun lead can cause jambs as the wire does not like sharp bends.

Pulling too hard on the gun can cause problems as well as the coiled feed -tube can be pulled out of the back of the copper guide in the gun.

My earth lead is about 3 metres (~ 10 feet) and my welding lead is 4 metres (~13 feet) which requires a lot of re-positioning the machine to either get it further away so as to reduce the bends or closer sop as to let me get around awkward corners.

I have an old "stick" welding habit that I can't get myself out of - keeping the arc going and lifting the "rod" (gun) to break the arc instead of just releasing the trigger on the MIG gun.

With the longer arc length and higher OCV I find that I can "paint" (illuminate) the weld area pretty well and just waste a bit of wire and then get the wire and arc just where I need it.

I do find that if I haven't used the MIG welder at all or have not used the process or the thickness/es of material for a while that I need to have a few practice runs to get my "feel" and the machine settings right.

Some of the welds when I start are not "pretty" but they are effective and look better as I proceed.

I prefer natural fillets but have no trouble with horizontal though I do need to be careful and practice my vertical up and vertical down before I start on the job.

I stick pretty well exclusively - but not always - to hot rolled plate, bar and rod as well as structural grade sections so I do reasonably well.

So, I can see quite well and my helmet is quite good - at last.

A lot of "vision" and "helmet" problems may in part at least be else-where in the process.

I don't have and don't want or need a TIG set as I haven't got the space as I do pretty well with my "Cobra"/"Dillon" oxy-acet set for all metal gas welding that I don't do on the MIG. I use it for all gas welding, brazing and heating although I use my normal O/A set for O/A cutting that is thicker than the 10mm(~3/8") nominal 12mm (~1/2") maximum for steel on my plasma cutter. The plasma cuts anything that is conductive and does it cleaner and with less distortion than the standard O/A "gas axe" (which will only cut steel) will. The plasma cuts copper and its alloys, stainless, aluminium etc.

Given that I don't use my stuff all that often - or at all for months sometimes - it is a problem remembering the settings and techniques and getting "stale".

Vision and light filters/protection are just as important on the other processes as it is with MIG.

radkins
05-17-2010, 06:53 AM
Fellows this one is not because of "old eyes" and what is being described here is a common problem with Auto dark helmets. The fact is they will be very dark right around the arc no matter how light the setting, to the point of almost blanking it out right over the puddle. I bought a Jackson Next Gen and it was no better in this respect than the Harbor Freight helmet I had been using for auto body work and I have found that this problem is present on every Auto Dark I have tried regardless of cost. The SpeedGlass seems to be some improvement, the best one I have tried anyway, but it does not eliminate the problem, far from it, and it seems about the only solution is to illuminate the puddle area with a bright light. Try this yourself, take both types of helmet and switch when in a situation where this problems occurs and the difference is amazing! An example would be MIG welding auto body parts where following the seam with very low current makes this a real problem, switching to the old conventional helmet makes all the difference in the world. So it is not just old eyes, it is the AD lens and cheap or expensive they all have this problem, it is the way they work and is just the nature of the beast.

Black Forest
05-17-2010, 07:15 AM
I have a SpeedGlass with the Adflo air filtration system. I like the Adflo because it acts as a defroster on the inside of the lens.

As to the "old" eyes. As you get older your eyes take longer to adjust to the change in light. Before you weld put your helmet on and wait about 2 minutes before you start to weld. Your eyes will adjust and you might be surprised at how well you can see the bead.

Don't use florescent lights to put more light on your work. They make it harder to see the whole process.

Glenn Wegman
05-17-2010, 08:06 AM
I snip the "ball-end" of the wire back to the nozzle before I start each welding work.

Perhaps your welder does not have it, but that is what the "burn back" adjustment is for. It sets a time delay between the arc stopping and the wire feeding to accomplish a proper projection of the wire when you stop welding. No need to have to clip it back each time.

Unless you are referring to purging the gun on initial start up of the welder. On mine I can easily release the wire feed so no wire feeds while purging.

S_J_H
05-17-2010, 08:36 AM
and it seems about the only solution is to illuminate the puddle area with a bright light. Try this yourself, take both types of helmet and switch when in a situation where this problems occurs and the difference is amazing!

Yep, I do the same whenever possible and it makes a tremendous difference.

Steve

Your Old Dog
05-17-2010, 11:29 AM
..............................................

This getting old SUCKS

Yup! And that's why I say I wish I would have flamed out on chicken wings, beer and fast women at age 30. To think I saved myself for this :D I'm taking enough pills everyday that it's a wonder I don't weigh more then I do!



Bill
To help see the weld edge, go to a stationary store and buy a silver lead pencil.
Put a line beside the weld with the pencil. When you strike the ark the line looks like a mirror.

Bob

That's a great tip Frank. Thanks. I've actually found myself wondering off the weld joint and out across the stock :D This tip could save me a lot of grinding wheels removing my errant way not to mention wire and gas.

radkins
05-17-2010, 12:57 PM
This getting old SUCKS


That is until you consider the alternative! :eek:

JoeLee
05-17-2010, 05:01 PM
I have a speedglass auto darkening lens and I've found that I can't see the weld puddle no matter what shade I set it on. It just looks washed out. Went back to my clunky old Jackson with a fixed lens and I can see the puddle just fine. Maybe it's just typical of auto darkening lenses.

JL................

radkins
05-17-2010, 05:25 PM
I have a speedglass auto darkening lens and I've found that I can't see the weld puddle no matter what shade I set it on. It just looks washed out. Went back to my clunky old Jackson with a fixed lens and I can see the puddle just fine. Maybe it's just typical of auto darkening lenses.

JL................



That's exactly what I was saying and yes it is typical of Auto Dark helmets no matter what brand. The fixed shade lens are much clearer especially on small wire/rod low AMP welds, changing the shade has little or no effect on this problem.

JoeLee
05-17-2010, 06:30 PM
Well I haven't tried the external light thing nor do I believe you should have to ad external light to weld, the process itself gives all the light you need and then some. Thats the purpose of the lens.
Besides positioning a light would just be a big pain in the ass.

JL...............

HSS
05-17-2010, 07:50 PM
As you said, JoeLee, you haven't tried it. Have you ever been in a spot light, like on a stage or something, and tried to see past the spot to the audience and then have them bring up the house lights? You can then see the audience just fine. Same thing as shining extra light on the weld area, it gets you past the spotlight of the arc.

Patrick

Black_Moons
05-17-2010, 08:01 PM
I have tryed additional light for hard welds and it is good.. Mind you, I was using a 500W halogen light 2' away and could praticaly see through a normal helmet lens under it

macona
05-17-2010, 08:41 PM
I am very careful that my earth lead is 100% as regards nicks and broken wire strands as well as connections at the welder and the earth-clamp (job end). If it is faulty or suspect - out it goes and a new one is fitted.


A few nicks or broken strands wont make a difference. Only bad thing that can happen is moisture can get in through a nick in the insulation and cause some corrosion in the lead. But that really only happens in wet environments like shipyards and other places I would rather not be working. A few broken strands will not make a difference in the long run.




I grind the earthing points on the job and keep them as close to the welding area as I can. I never "earth" the job via an earth connection to a welding table or jig or fixture as there is too much chance of unwanted resistance in the circuit as which lowers the "Open Circuit" voltage (OCV).

I have my OCV as high as I can get it for the job in hand as it stablises the arc and improves the weld fusion and bead. It will make up for any minor losses due to poor connections.


I am just going to be blunt here and say you have no clue what you talking about. OVC is the welders unloaded voltage output at the terminals. Nothing more. The only way you will an effect on OCV on a CV MIG machine is changing the voltage taps/control. And even then OCV makes no difference.

Gounding to a jig or fixture is just fine. The amount of resistance in a table is unmeasureable with standard ohm meters. It will not effect the weld.






I snip the "ball-end" of the wire back to the nozzle before I start each welding work. If the time between welds is too long I "blip" the gun to make sure that my shroud id full of gas and that I have gas on the job before the arc starts.


Cutting the end off is optional, not really necessary. Blipping the gun is not needed. Both argon and CO2 are heavier than air and the amount that comes out for the blip wont stay around for more than a fraction of a second. Thats what preflow is for.





I keep my shroud back about 20>25mm (3/4">1") from the job and work toward where I am looking so that I can see the arc, the wire and the weld fusion.


Thats way too much stickout. Especially combined with the 1/8" recess you have on you nozzle. You should be half that.





Pulling too hard on the gun can cause problems as well as the coiled feed -tube can be pulled out of the back of the copper guide in the gun.



Never pull on a gun. Good way to ruin one.




With the longer arc length and higher OCV I find that I can "paint" (illuminate) the weld area pretty well and just waste a bit of wire and then get the wire and arc just where I need it.



Thats just a terrible habit.

oldtiffie
05-17-2010, 09:55 PM
Originally Posted by oldtiffie
I snip the "ball-end" of the wire back to the nozzle before I start each welding work.


Perhaps your welder does not have it, but that is what the "burn back" adjustment is for. It sets a time delay between the arc stopping and the wire feeding to accomplish a proper projection of the wire when you stop welding. No need to have to clip it back each time.

Unless you are referring to purging the gun on initial start up of the welder. On mine I can easily release the wire feed so no wire feeds while purging.

Glenn.

Yes I have that setting, but I prefer to "snip the end" as I get the wire end close up to to nozzle/guide. I "surge" the gas to replenish the shroud if there is a breeze blowing on if I've left it for more than a few seconds since welding. That way I am ready to go with a charged shroud and clean wire. I am sure that there is a gas "cloud" at the job before the wire gets there and strikes the arc.

I do charge my lead with gas as soon as I am start the machine. I open the wire feed rollers - as you say - and pull the trigger. But doing that every time I wanted to charge the shroud is not practical and my wire feed is inside the welder - with the access door closed. A "blip and a snip" is easy as I keep a good set of side-cutting pliers on hand just for that purpose.

My main purpose in my previous post was to show/say that not all problems with seeing the arc and the welding process are related to the helmet - many are - but not all are.

I work in what-ever ambient light there is - daylight or artificial (roof-mounted florescent). I don't flood the work with light as the more intense it is the more my eyes dilate and the longer it takes them to re-adjust to the darker environment under the helmet. I can see well enough through my lens on my helmet to see where the "gun" is in relation to the job and can position it and myself during which time my eyes are adjusted and then I strike the arc and work behind/through the now-darkened lens with my eyes at the right setting as well.

As I said earlier, I grind all faces that are to be welded and that pays off in spades while welding as I not only have an optimum surface/face but I get optimum reflection at the weld face to illuminate the job. I reckon that I can see a circle of 1">1 1/2" diameter centred on the arc while welding - sometimes more.

I can still see quite well while welding with the current at 30 amps - which is pretty good. Needless to say - as expected - with higher currents the illumination is better.

I "illuminate" the weld area by pretty well "vaporising" (and losing and spattering) some electrode but it works well as a "candle" - just an old "stick" welding method (dragging the electrode then with-drawing it to light the job up - as well as warm up the job and the electrode) and then plunge in to the weld site/pool. It might be a bit "messy" (spatter) but its a damned side easier than grinding out a badly started weld and re-welding.

I chose a big welder as it has a 100% duty cycle in the current range that I use but more importantly there is no steep drop-off of OCV as the current gets higher.

All of this adds to the visibility of the the weld process.

I am not all that certain that visibility problems are as much caused by the helmet as some might think they are.

But having said that, getting a good helmet that works well was a long and expensive process.

The best helmet was not necessarily the most expensive either.

A lot of helmets with "good names" stick a pretty steep price premium on the "name" as an enticement where-as some less expensive and lesser "named" helmets are very good value.

I have no problem with manufacturers and their re-sellers trading on the "name" - providing that they live up to what that "name" seems to infer as regards performance and value for money.

A lot of the "problem" is with the technique (or lack of it) by the user/welder who just hasn't "got it" or just has not or will not learn to improve his technique. Welding in large part is a pure manual art and requires pretty good dexterity and eye-to-hand instant anticipation, reaction and co-ordination. Some have "it" from the "get go", some learn it easily and some not so easily - and some not at all - or never.

Sometimes its all too easy to blame the "tools" (machine, helmet, electrode, work etc. etc.) but never or rarely themselves.

Glenn Wegman
05-17-2010, 11:11 PM
Hello Tiffy,

I fifgured you probably has a reason for your method, but you never know!

I've never owned an auto darkening helmet, and probably never will. My primary form of welding has always been TIG, and MIG as an occasional secondary so I see no use for one as in both the torch is easily positioned and held there until you are ready to start the arc. I could see an advantage to one with stick welding as it's not always easy to jab the electrode in the right spot when you can't see it.

The other thing is that I just don't trust them! Like anything else electronic, it has to fail some time.

Years and years ago I was doing some high amperage aluminum welding. I had taken off my ball cap and placed it on the bench in order to use the welding helmet. I had done a couple of welds and removed the helmet to reposition the part and get a drink. Afterwords I mistakenly picked up my cap, put it on, and struck an arc. :eek: It was a very long painful night to say the least. I was at the Ophthalmoligist a few months ago and he asked where I got the nice scars in the back of my eyes and asked if it was from an auto darkening lens.

oldtiffie
05-18-2010, 12:09 AM
Glenn.

I check my helmet as soon as I put it on to start a job. I just start the wire and drag it - it farts and splutters but is not full power but is enough to see that the helmet works OK. If its OK I go ahead - otherwise I try to see what the problem is or get a spare helmet. If I can't find or remedy the problem simply I break the helmet up and consign it straight to the $hit bin.

If I don't have a good helmet to use I switch the welder off and put it away - full stop!!

As you allude to, a couple of hundred bucks is neither here nor there when it comes to my eyes.

I have never been entirely sure about the battery-powered helmets as I had the batteries fail in one and fall out in another.

I suspect that some use too low a setting for the type of welding and the current being used - ie always set on the lowest - ie 9.

My current (sorry) helmet is Italian-made and I am very happy with it. My dealer has spares if needed as well as a good stock of the helmets.

I have never had any adverse effects from any of my auto helmets - the "off" lens seemed to work well enough for an instant if the "Auto" failed. I just dumped the helmet/s. I suspect that some persevere and use the helmet if the "auto" fails. That "just a bit more" can have some bloody uncomfortable immediate ("hot sand") and longer-lasting cumulative effects.

I have some welding to do later today or tomorrow.

I wear "MIG" leather gauntlets as well as a flannelette shirt, over-alls and steel-capped industrial boots. Those burns to exposed hands, arms, neck and what-ever are something else that I well do without.

I have a "green" leather apron which gets used when I am using the O/A or "Cobra" torches either at the bench or when cutting. I still have but rarely need to use a full welders green leather jacket - the whole bit. When I needed it I used to wear welders "spats" or "gaiters" to keep stuff out of my boots. I found that military gaiters were best.

The biggest hazard as regards welding here is putting the MIG gun down on the trigger - that bloody wire gets bloody hot if it hits a return path as it tears along!!! - it has hit me twice and I made the mistake of grabbing it with a bare hand - twice - the first time - which was also the last time.

I have a spare helmet for anyone else who is in the shop - usually my wife is she is helping me.

MuellerNick
05-18-2010, 01:42 AM
The other thing is that I just don't trust them! Like anything else electronic, it has to fail some time.

A auto helmet can't fail completely. The darkening feature just filters in the visible range. The rest (UV-rays) is always on and always being filtered, because it's a coating on the lens. You don't get a hazzardous flash if the helmet doesn't darken. You just get too much light, no harm, just dizzy for some seconds.


How do you know you are talking to a weldor? By the black spot on his nose!
It's important to get the lens as close as possible to your eyes. This too avoids coming light into from the back that reflects and irritates you.


Nick

radkins
05-18-2010, 10:32 AM
The other thing is that I just don't trust them! Like anything else electronic, it has to fail some time.




Muellernick is 100% right about those things but even after they have been around over 25 years this myth still exists! The lens material absorbs the harmful rays and you are in no danger of flash burn even if the thing does fail to go dark, which they often do. You DO NOT receive a momentary flash when the arc is first imitated as a lot of people very mistakenly believe and the time it takes for a lens to switch (or not) has nothing to do with protection from harmful rays. The switching function cuts down the visible light to a comfortable level but the harmful rays are filtered out by the lens material before that even happens, UV/IR filtration on these things is always there even if the lens fails.


A lens that has been physically DAMAGED however may not offer full protection so if it has been scratched or pitted because of a missing cover plate it may not be safe to use, this however should be obvious.

kc5ezc
05-18-2010, 12:21 PM
Glad to hear about the 'seeing' problems with an auto darkening helmet. I have the problem and thought I was the only one.
I can work now knowing that it is not just me. I have added lights and magnifier lens in the helmet and it is better now.
Thanks for the input.