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woodswhole
05-23-2010, 11:42 PM
I realize that I don't belong on this blog because I'm not one of the "guys". I'm a female physician, not a machinist, or even a want to be machinist. However, you all seemed like the best people to ask for some solid advice on my issue at hand. So, my apologies in advance for disturbing your shop reveries, although I have found some of them (especially the Folsom Prison tour group thread) very entertaining.

My husband died last year and I am slowly getting around to clearing away some of the massive accumulation of things in a 3 car garage in which I have never parked in in 32 years, secondary to my husbands many hobbies. He was a scientist who was very "handy" and just loved his garage as his escape for some quite time. Most of the items in the garage I have had no difficulty knowing how to place a value on, one of our three adult sons have wanted them, or I have had need to keep a few of them myself. I am not without some personal hands on skills on small woodworking projects.

However, I have come to a dead halt when it comes to the 2 lathes he left behind. Both are in good working condition. The easier of the two to describe is a 1992 Enco 12X36 lathe on a table with cabinet drawers, with a significant number of attachments, most of which I do not know the exact names of. However, I did count 26 different sizes of collars--I believe this is the correct term (the device a drill bit would fit into). There are several chucks, 3 boxes of drill bits in every imaginable size including large cone shaped ones, several of what I would refer to as cutting blades, hex wrenches and other tools, such as wrenches, for working on the lathe itself in a tool box that matches the lathe and it's table in color. Additionally, there are 3 large, heavy, round, metal discs that clearly go with this lathe which I am clueless about regarding their use. They range from 6" to 12" or 13" in diameter and are several inches in heights. They appear to have been designed for different purposes. These three I have to use 2 hands to lift because they are so heavy. There are also 3 large clamp like pieces which may be stabilizing devices. There are many more odds and ends which I found in the cabinet but this gives you a general idea of the accessories which I have found.

The second lathe is an antique. My husband's grandfather, who became a machinist after he walking out of Russia at the age of 13 and emigrating to the United States, used it in his shop in Ohio. It is an EMco not an Enco. It was made in Austria. I do have the original instruction booklet for it. It is a Maximat MQ-3100. The best way to describe this lathe is to go to a web site that can do it far better than I: www.lathes.co.uk. Both motors purr on this device. It needs a couple of new belts, but this is easily possible. It has extra equipment with it, but not to the extent of the Enco.

So my question to the experts is what are these machines worth? Fair and reasonable price, nothing exorbitant. I have looked at Craigs lists all over the country, called Enco personally, looked on eBay, and I have yet to to come up with a clear concept of their worth. This is simply out of my field of expertise. Can you help me?

Katherine

jkeyser14
05-23-2010, 11:51 PM
The Enco new is $2500, see:

http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PARTPG=INSRAR2&PMAKA=510-2584&PMPXNO=9033434

I would price the Enco lathe at $1000 since it's used and see if anyone bites. If no one takes it after two weeks, drop the price $200. If still no takers, drop again. You could try a similar approach with the Maximat.

lakeside53
05-23-2010, 11:52 PM
The MQ3100 if in decent shape can sell for $1500 to $2000. Does it have the mill as well as the headstock? On that lathe the headstock can be taken off and used as the mill, but it's not very convenient.

The Enco... around $1000, maybe more... depends on the tooling package and quality.


Pictures would really help.

MTNGUN
05-23-2010, 11:59 PM
Hi Katherine,
Used tools are worth whatever someone is willing to pay.

The Enco 12x36 is an import lathe that is still available from Enco as well as from other companies. It is very popular, and it's a decent lathe for the home shop. New, they go for $1800 - $3000, depending on which company you buy it from. Obviously, you aren't going to get the price of a new lathe.

Most of the accessories you describe come with the lathe and are included in the price. I'm sure your late husband accumulated additional accessories, like the collets, but that's not going to help the price that much. Personally, I wouldn't pay much more than $1000 - $1200, bearing in mind that I could get a new, equivalent 12x36 from Harbor Freight for $1800 - $2000.

I'm not familiar with the Maximat, but hopefully someone else will be along to help you with that.

In general, most people will only pay about 1/2 the price of new, for used tools, if even that. Factor in the poor economy, and I'm sorry to say that you may not get a lot on the sale of these tools.

woodswhole
05-24-2010, 12:01 AM
Yes, the MQ3100 does have both the mill and the headstock, if you are referring to the horizontal component on one side that's run by one motor and then the separate vertical component on the other side of it that's run by a completely separate motor, which is what I think you are asking.

woodswhole
05-24-2010, 12:06 AM
Hi Katherine,
Used tools are worth whatever someone is willing to pay.

The Enco 12x36 is an import lathe that is still available from Enco as well as from other companies. It is very popular, and it's a decent lathe for the home shop. New, they go for $1800 - $3000, depending on which company you buy it from. Obviously, you aren't going to get the price of a new lathe.

Most of the accessories you describe come with the lathe and are included in the price. I'm sure your late husband accumulated additional accessories, like the collets, but that's not going to help the price that much. Personally, I wouldn't pay much more than $1000 - $1200, bearing in mind that I could get a new, equivalent 12x36 from Harbor Freight for $1800 - $2000.

I'm not familiar with the Maximat, but hopefully someone else will be along to help you with that.

In general, most people will only pay about 1/2 the price of new, for used tools, if even that. Factor in the poor economy, and I'm sorry to say that you may not get a lot on the sale of these tools.
I'm not so worried about the amount of money. I'd just like to be in the general ball park when I advertise these items and I really could not get a feel for them. Usually you can research these things and get some sort of and idea. But, when you call Enco and they won't even give you any idea . . . . .and then the other machine is from 1962?

woodswhole
05-24-2010, 12:09 AM
The MQ3100 if in decent shape can sell for $1500 to $2000. Does it have the mill as well as the headstock? On that lathe the headstock can be taken off and used as the mill, but it's not very convenient.

The Enco... around $1000, maybe more... depends on the tooling package and quality.


Pictures would really help.
I didn't figure out this quick reply thing previously, so my earlier response to is somewhere in the thread. I have some photos of the Enco I took earlier today. I'm not sure how to put them on this site. I'll see if I can get them on. The Emco will have to wait till dawns light.

lakeside53
05-24-2010, 12:12 AM
Yes, the MQ3100 does have both the mill and the headstock, if you are referring to the horizontal component on one side that's run by one motor and then the separate vertical component on the other side of it that's run by a completely separate motor, which is what I think you are asking.


That configuration will bring good interest. The Emco machines are top quality and have followers that pay good money.. Oh.. I own an EMCO :D

The MQ3100 does not have a hardened bed. Take a close picture of the ways (two long flat metal surfaces that go the length of the bed) near the headstock -that will tell a lot about the wear.

Doc Nickel
05-24-2010, 12:16 AM
First off, my condolences for your loss.

Second, what help I can provide: I'll grab some example items from eBay just as a quick and dirty sample. They will not be representative of a given item's value, nor will they look exactly the same. They're just general/generic examples.

The 26 objects are "collets" (http://cgi.ebay.com/NICE-3-4-CAPACITY-5C-COLLET-/280509536499?cmd=ViewItem&pt=BI_Tool_Work_Holding&hash=item414fabd8f3), most likely 5C given the vintage of the lathe. They hold the workpiece in the lathe spindle. You will likely find an object that looks either like this (http://cgi.ebay.com/5C-COLLET-CLOSER-DRAWBAR-SOUTH-BEND-HEAVY-10-LATHE-TOOL-/230477601809?cmd=ViewItem&pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item35a9891c11#ht_1204wt_935) or this (http://cgi.ebay.com/NEW-5C-COLLET-CLOSER-SET-SOUTH-BEND-HEAVY-10-LATHE-/400082457354?cmd=ViewItem&pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item5d26c5d30a#ht_1748wt_1010) in amongst the accessories- these are 'closers' for the collets.

The round discs are either chucks or faceplates or both. A chuck will typically be either a "4-jaw" (http://cgi.ebay.com/FUERDA-3-4-Jaw-Independent-Plain-Back-Lathe-Chuck-/130392354398?cmd=ViewItem&pt=BI_Tool_Work_Holding&hash=item1e5bfd6e5e#ht_500wt_951) or a "3-jaw" (http://cgi.ebay.com/12-SELF-CENTER-3-JAW-LATHE-CHUCK-D1-6-CAM-LOC-/390197998532?cmd=ViewItem&pt=BI_Tool_Work_Holding&hash=item5ad99cf3c4#ht_2391wt_935). A "faceplate" (http://cgi.ebay.com/South-Bend-Southbend-9-Metal-Lathe-Face-Plate-/320531510805?cmd=ViewItem&pt=BI_Tool_Work_Holding&hash=item4aa12ab615#ht_1596wt_935) will just be thin, flat and have holes or slots.

The "clamp like pieces" are probably steady and follow rests. A "follow rest" (http://cgi.ebay.com/NEW-FOLLOW-FOLLOWER-REST-SOUTH-BEND-9-LATHE-/140331095503?cmd=ViewItem&pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item20ac6295cf#ht_2661wt_1010) will have two 'fingers' and a "steady rest" (http://cgi.ebay.com/NEW-STEADY-REST-SOUTH-BEND-16-LATHE-/400074042475?cmd=ViewItem&pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item5d26456c6b#ht_956wt_1010) will have three, forming a complete circle.

The overall value of the machine depends on your area (it'd be worth half as much on the East Coast, for example, as it would up here in Alaska) the condition of the machine (machine tools are built to very close tolerances- it doesn't take much to make one "worn out") and what sort of accessories it has (sounds like yours is pretty well tooled up.)

Extremely rough ballpark figure? $1,800 maybe? Some of the others can pip up as well, get a sort of consensus.

The EMCO will be considered a bit more 'valuable' being a European import rather than an Asian import, but again, it'll depend on condition, accessories and location.

Photos could help a lot- we can tell a lot by a picture, and ID some of the smaller ancillary bits as well.

Doc.

Dr Stan
05-24-2010, 12:24 AM
Woodshole contact the member Ace

woodswhole
05-24-2010, 12:36 AM
I didn't figure out this quick reply thing previously, so my earlier response to is somewhere in the thread. I have some photos of the Enco I took earlier today. I'm not sure how to put them on this site. I'll see if I can get them on. The Emco will have to wait till dawns light.
I will take exactly those photos and more in the morning. These machines are in California, so I'm on PST. Thank you so much for such specific advice.

BadDog
05-24-2010, 12:37 AM
If you said where they are located, I missed it. Location matters a great deal, and they will bring a lot more in Southern CA than in Chicago (going from your profile location).

Edit: Of course, seconds before I click "submit", you answer my question. :D

As for posting photos, click here for a thread describing how. (http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=29277)

Edit: Fixed link

woodswhole
05-24-2010, 12:45 AM
First off, my condolences for your loss.

Second, what help I can provide: I'll grab some example items from eBay just as a quick and dirty sample. They will not be representative of a given item's value, nor will they look exactly the same. They're just general/generic examples.

The 26 objects are "collets" (http://cgi.ebay.com/NICE-3-4-CAPACITY-5C-COLLET-/280509536499?cmd=ViewItem&pt=BI_Tool_Work_Holding&hash=item414fabd8f3), most likely 5C given the vintage of the lathe. They hold the workpiece in the lathe spindle. You will likely find an object that looks either like this (http://cgi.ebay.com/5C-COLLET-CLOSER-DRAWBAR-SOUTH-BEND-HEAVY-10-LATHE-TOOL-/230477601809?cmd=ViewItem&pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item35a9891c11#ht_1204wt_935) or this (http://cgi.ebay.com/NEW-5C-COLLET-CLOSER-SET-SOUTH-BEND-HEAVY-10-LATHE-/400082457354?cmd=ViewItem&pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item5d26c5d30a#ht_1748wt_1010) in amongst the accessories- these are 'closers' for the collets.

The round discs are either chucks or faceplates or both. A chuck will typically be either a "4-jaw" (http://cgi.ebay.com/FUERDA-3-4-Jaw-Independent-Plain-Back-Lathe-Chuck-/130392354398?cmd=ViewItem&pt=BI_Tool_Work_Holding&hash=item1e5bfd6e5e#ht_500wt_951) or a "3-jaw" (http://cgi.ebay.com/12-SELF-CENTER-3-JAW-LATHE-CHUCK-D1-6-CAM-LOC-/390197998532?cmd=ViewItem&pt=BI_Tool_Work_Holding&hash=item5ad99cf3c4#ht_2391wt_935). A "faceplate" (http://cgi.ebay.com/South-Bend-Southbend-9-Metal-Lathe-Face-Plate-/320531510805?cmd=ViewItem&pt=BI_Tool_Work_Holding&hash=item4aa12ab615#ht_1596wt_935) will just be thin, flat and have holes or slots.

The "clamp like pieces" are probably steady and follow rests. A "follow rest" (http://cgi.ebay.com/NEW-FOLLOW-FOLLOWER-REST-SOUTH-BEND-9-LATHE-/140331095503?cmd=ViewItem&pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item20ac6295cf#ht_2661wt_1010) will have two 'fingers' and a "steady rest" (http://cgi.ebay.com/NEW-STEADY-REST-SOUTH-BEND-16-LATHE-/400074042475?cmd=ViewItem&pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item5d26456c6b#ht_956wt_1010) will have three, forming a complete circle.

The overall value of the machine depends on your area (it'd be worth half as much on the East Coast, for example, as it would up here in Alaska) the condition of the machine (machine tools are built to very close tolerances- it doesn't take much to make one "worn out") and what sort of accessories it has (sounds like yours is pretty well tooled up.)

Extremely rough ballpark figure? $1,800 maybe? Some of the others can pip up as well, get a sort of consensus.

The EMCO will be considered a bit more 'valuable' being a European import rather than an Asian import, but again, it'll depend on condition, accessories and location.

Photos could help a lot- we can tell a lot by a picture, and ID some of the smaller ancillary bits as well.

Doc.
My gosh, I can't tell you what a great teacher you are! I feel as though I am in Machine Class 1A. The photos were very helpful. I do have a 4-jaw and a 3-jaw chuck and a faceplate, plus both the follow and the steady rest. I love being able to name things. It makes life and communication so much easier. Both these machines are in my main home in Del Mar, CA. I am working on the photos, but probably won't get them on line until tomorrow morning because the light just isn't that great at night. K

woodswhole
05-24-2010, 12:48 AM
Woodshole contact the member Ace
Dr. Stan,
I'm not sure, since I really don't do forums or blogs, how to locate "Ace".
Katherine

oldtiffie
05-24-2010, 01:04 AM
Originally Posted by lakeside53
The MQ3100 if in decent shape can sell for $1500 to $2000. Does it have the mill as well as the headstock? On that lathe the headstock can be taken off and used as the mill, but it's not very convenient.

The Enco... around $1000, maybe more... depends on the tooling package and quality.


Pictures would really help.

I didn't figure out this quick reply thing previously, so my earlier response to is somewhere in the thread. I have some photos of the Enco I took earlier today. I'm not sure how to put them on this site. I'll see if I can get them on. The Emco will have to wait till dawns light.
Katherine.

My condolences.

Re. the pics. - I guess you know - or could get someone else - to attach photos to an email. If you were to attach them to an email to any of us here, they could post it to their on-line "Photo Bucket" account and then post the link either to their own post here or email the link for you to post here yourself (just a quick "cut and paste" job - just a few minutes work).

All of us are going to have to either dispose of our tools or have them disposed of for us eventually, so its not something that we are unaware of.

I wish you everything that you wish for yourself.

D_Harris
05-24-2010, 01:08 AM
You may want to lay everything out before you take the pics. Take pics of the machines from a variety of angles, and close-ups of the "bed ways" if you know what they are.

And if you can upload to a site like Photobucket, the more pics the better.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.

doctor demo
05-24-2010, 02:16 AM
Dr. Stan,
I'm not sure, since I really don't do forums or blogs, how to locate "Ace".
Katherine

Katherine, I'm not sure who ''Ace'' is either and I've been here a while.
What ever You do, DON'T call a dealer to come make You an offer on the whole lot. Most are like bad used car salesmen. If there is any thing more that We can do to help feel free to ask.

Steve

danlb
05-24-2010, 02:26 AM
Just a quick point;

The age does not matter very much when discussing well maintained machines that are used mainly in a hobby. The same basic designs and features have been used for the last 50 to 75 years.

My condolences...

Dan

JMcTool
05-24-2010, 02:48 AM
I love being able to name things. It makes life and communication so much easier. <snip> I am working on the photos, but probably won't get them on line until tomorrow morning because the light just isn't that great at night. K

Katherine,

You picked a good resource when you mentioned http://lathes.co.uk . I have some further info from that site that may be of interest, specifically some pages to help you name the parts of a lathe http://lathes.co.uk/latheparts/ .

Given your mention of the site, I suspect you already have found this info, but I'll list it anyway. Picture of the Emco MQ-3100 lathe http://www.lathes.co.uk/emco/page16.html . General Emco info starts at http://www.lathes.co.uk/emco/index.html .

Keep in mind many hobbyist machinists spend as much or more on tooling as their machines, so the better the pics the more likely someone will be able to tell you exactly what you have.

Not one of the guys? You have already supplied more solid info than many newbies, and you have already done some solid research. Your scientific background has served you well.

Jim

oldtiffie
05-24-2010, 03:31 AM
I realize that I don't belong on this blog because I'm not one of the "guys". I'm a female physician, not a machinist, or even a want to be machinist. However, you all seemed like the best people to ask for some solid advice on my issue at hand. So, my apologies in advance for disturbing your shop reveries, although I have found some of them (especially the Folsom Prison tour group thread) very entertaining.

.................................................. .
...........................................

I am not without some personal hands on skills on small woodworking projects.

..................................................
.................................................. ...

So my question to the experts is what are these machines worth? Fair and reasonable price, nothing exorbitant. I have looked at Craigs lists all over the country, called Enco personally, looked on eBay, and I have yet to to come up with a clear concept of their worth. This is simply out of my field of expertise. Can you help me?

Katherine

Katherine.

You are very welcome here.

Not all "machinists" are "metal-workers" and "machinists" and so "wood- working" machinists" are included - as you are - and there are many wood-worker machinists here too.

Yup.

So far as I know the hobby or the forum is not limited to males - and just as well as we could do with a bit more of the couth and decorum that comes with having lady/female/women members here!!

There are several lady members here that I am aware of.

Evan's wife and daughter are but two - to keep an eye on him I guess - and he needed it - badly!!

Some blokes here encourage their wives to read stuff on here and some wives read it anyway.

Some blokes are petrified with fear lest there wives do read what they do and say, what "porkies" they've told, what stuff they've bought and intend to buy without their wives approval from either her money or worse from funds that they (the wives) didn't know their husbands had or had access to - or worse - had committed!!

They are almost the Tiger Woods of the HSM/machinist fraternity!!

God help 'em is she reads their "Face-book" at al accounts!!!

dexter
05-24-2010, 10:06 AM
This winter I sold a Maximat MQ-3100 lathe with milling attachment, extra chuck, follow rest, center rest and some tooling for $1700 Canadian. The lathe did have some wear which was pointed out to the buyer. It sold in two days at the list price and I had numerous inquires.

Tony Ennis
05-24-2010, 10:10 AM
Sorry about your loss. Best wishes on reclaiming your garage space. I think being in CA is going to help you move the machinery pretty quick. The west coast tends to have fewer choices for used machinery.

loose nut
05-24-2010, 10:25 AM
Woodswhole, maybe you shouldn't be in such a hurry to sell this equipment. If you hang around this forum long enough you might get the urge to to start using it.

Dr Stan
05-24-2010, 11:17 AM
Dr. Stan,
I'm not sure, since I really don't do forums or blogs, how to locate "Ace".
Katherine

Go to this thread: http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=41538

Click on his screen name and it will give you the several options including Send a Private Message. Click on this and you can send him your contact info about your lathes.

Circlip
05-24-2010, 11:54 AM
Dedicated site for the eMco Woodshole:- emcov10lathe@yahoogroups.com

One thing you possibly need to try is to keep all the eMco parts together for the lathe/miller as these usually fetch a better premium than todays offerings. You will have to sign up to the group (Free), but it will give you access to photos of what the accessories for it look like and a probable sales bench.

Regards Ian.

Evan
05-24-2010, 11:55 AM
You should contact the Southern California Live Steamers Miniature Railroad club in Torrance. I am sure you will find somebody interested in driving down to have a look at the equipment. A live steamers railroad club is a club for machinists that like to build large models of old railroad locomotives and the Torrance club is a large group.

http://www.southerncalifornialivesteamers.com/

edit: The kind of people that will belong to that club are very unlikely to try and cheat you on the price of the equipment.

ace
05-24-2010, 12:29 PM
Go to this thread: http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=41538

Click on his screen name and it will give you the several options including Send a Private Message. Click on this and you can send him your contact info about your lathes.

If she is in CA, then I think it might be easier for her to see if she can sell them locally. I don't think she would want to go through the hassle of shipping such a heavy item across the country.

lakeside53
05-24-2010, 12:35 PM
Shipping can be easy - "local pickup only". Then it's the buyers responsibility to send a common carrier/rigger to pick it up.

Bob D.
05-24-2010, 12:51 PM
Sorry for your loss.

Second that recommendation to the Yahoo group, Some very helpful folks there too, some of whom may want a particular accessory and you would probably get a few dollars more that way than bundled all together in one package.

emcov10lathe@yahoogroups.com


I have the same emco lathe, also with the vertical milling attachment. In very good shape with an abundance of emco accessories, I paid $2000 for it in New Jersey about a decade ago.

Dr Stan
05-24-2010, 01:19 PM
If she is in CA, then I think it might be easier for her to see if she can sell them locally. I don't think she would want to go through the hassle of shipping such a heavy item across the country.

She lists locations in CA & Chicago. However, shipping across the country is not much trouble.

Rookie machinist
05-24-2010, 01:43 PM
Condolences on your loss.

I am a member of Southern California Live Steamers, at this time we are not looking for any new equipment. The most we could do right now would be to accept it as a donation. We are in the process of expanding our track and facilities and new equipment would be out of the budget.

If woodswhole would like someone to come by the garage and explain to her what goes with what machines and the proper names and uses I would be more than happy to help. Del Mar is not to far from where I live. Feel free to send me a PM if you would like my assitance.

Evan, how did you know about SCLS, you ever been to the club, or did you locate us through a web search?

Steve

Circlip
05-24-2010, 02:28 PM
edit: The kind of people that will belong to that club are very unlikely to try and cheat you on the price of the equipment.


Which Club are you refering to Evan???

Regards Ian.

Evan
05-24-2010, 02:45 PM
Evan, how did you know about SCLS, you ever been to the club, or did you locate us through a web search?


I grew up in Berkeley and spent many a fine day at the Golden Gate Live Steamers facility in Tilden Park. One of the members had a "play house" at his home in the back yard in the shape of a well fitted steam boat including a good sized steam engine in the engine room. He taught me how to run it safely when I was about 10 years old. I was also aware of the So Cal Live steamers as I have spent a lot of time in that area as well. I have a soft spot for live steam as I grew up beside the tracks of the San Ramon Branch Line near Alamo. It was the last regularly scheduled commercial steam engine in service in the USA and it went past our house twice a day. I found the club on the web but I knew what I was looking for.

http://metalshopborealis.ca/pics/steamsrbl.jpg

woodswhole
05-24-2010, 03:38 PM
You may want to lay everything out before you take the pics. Take pics of the machines from a variety of angles, and close-ups of the "bed ways" if you know what they are.

And if you can upload to a site like Photobucket, the more pics the better.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.
I have just laid everything out for the Enco and am silenting cursing you (just joking). You will under stand when I download the photos in Photobucket. I now remember why I didn't want to unload all of the cabinets previously.
K

woodswhole
05-24-2010, 03:41 PM
Katherine,

You picked a good resource when you mentioned http://lathes.co.uk . I have some further info from that site that may be of interest, specifically some pages to help you name the parts of a lathe http://lathes.co.uk/latheparts/ .

Given your mention of the site, I suspect you already have found this info, but I'll list it anyway. Picture of the Emco MQ-3100 lathe http://www.lathes.co.uk/emco/page16.html . General Emco info starts at http://www.lathes.co.uk/emco/index.html .

Keep in mind many hobbyist machinists spend as much or more on tooling as their machines, so the better the pics the more likely someone will be able to tell you exactly what you have.

Not one of the guys? You have already supplied more solid info than many newbies, and you have already done some solid research. Your scientific background has served you well.

Jim
Thanks for the link to the page that labels all of the parts of the lathe. I had not gone to that one and it is very instructive.
K

woodswhole
05-24-2010, 03:44 PM
Katherine.

You are very welcome here.

Not all "machinists" are "metal-workers" and "machinists" and so "wood- working" machinists" are included - as you are - and there are many wood-worker machinists here too.

Yup.

So far as I know the hobby or the forum is not limited to males - and just as well as we could do with a bit more of the couth and decorum that comes with having lady/female/women members here!!

There are several lady members here that I am aware of.

Evan's wife and daughter are but two - to keep an eye on him I guess - and he needed it - badly!!

Some blokes here encourage their wives to read stuff on here and some wives read it anyway.

Some blokes are petrified with fear lest there wives do read what they do and say, what "porkies" they've told, what stuff they've bought and intend to buy without their wives approval from either her money or worse from funds that they (the wives) didn't know their husbands had or had access to - or worse - had committed!!

They are almost the Tiger Woods of the HSM/machinist fraternity!!

God help 'em is she reads their "Face-book" at al accounts!!!
You know what, you are really funny. I laughed quite a bit at your response. There is, however, a lot of truth in it (I can't speak to the section Evan), which is what brings the true humor to it.
K

cuemaker
05-24-2010, 06:02 PM
Some blokes are petrified with fear lest there wives do read what they do and say, what "porkies" they've told, what stuff they've bought and intend to buy without their wives approval from either her money or worse from funds that they (the wives) didn't know their husbands had or had access to - or worse - had committed!!

They are almost the Tiger Woods of the HSM/machinist fraternity!!


I guess I belong in the "Tiger Woods" fraternity of wanna be wood/ machinists....I have an account with money that the wife dont know about. I have enough crap now that she doesnt question were some odd tool comes from most of the time... but its hard to hide a welder or some such item.

rohart
05-24-2010, 06:43 PM
I'd have thought that with a Maximat it would be important to ascertain whether the dials and gearbox were metric or imperial. Certainly on this side of the pond in the UK they seem about half and half. In the EU they'll all be metric of course. The Emco users who've already put their heads up may tell you otherwise.

A close-up of the gearbox plate - the plate with columns of number on it - would make that clear. A metric dial will usually go from 0 thru 10 to 20, meaning 0.1 or 0.2 mm, while an imperial dial will count up to 10 or 25, meaning 0.1 or 0.25 inch.

A photo of the mounting nose on the headstock would let a buyer know if it's a metric 39 x 4 screw-on or otherwise.

Dr Stan
05-24-2010, 07:43 PM
I guess I belong in the "Tiger Woods" fraternity of wanna be wood/ machinists....I have an account with money that the wife dont know about. I have enough crap now that she doesnt question were some odd tool comes from most of the time... but its hard to hide a welder or some such item.

My wife is an artist so she has as much in the way of equipment and tools as I. I've also supported her work for 30 years and she knows better than to question my hobby (she did once and found out it was not a good idea).

vincemulhollon
05-25-2010, 12:14 PM
I guess I belong in the "Tiger Woods" fraternity of wanna be wood/ machinists....I have an account with money that the wife dont know about. I have enough crap now that she doesnt question were some odd tool comes from most of the time... but its hard to hide a welder or some such item.

You need to hang with the ham radio guys some more, they're masters at this artform. I'd never admit to any such activities, of course. But here's some things I've seen:

1) Yer shop needs a vacuum cleaner. And not just for swarf. You apply the dust, liberally, to the new machine before carrying it in the house. "Oh, that old thing? It was in the back of the garage, eh?" Yeah maybe for 30 seconds. No matter what you do, never clean something until it arrives at its final resting place. A pity that nice new welder of cuemaker's is all dusty, looks like it lived in the back of the garage for decades. Side benefit is this tactic saves a lot of cleaning time.

2) Take it apart and bring in the house one piece at a time. An empty amplifier case can't be worth much dough. Neither a bare amplifier chassis without case nor tubes or xformer and missing some knobs. Nor an individual ultra high power vacuum tube. Oh look I bought a new amplifier knob. Course, put it all back together again once in the privacy of the shack, on some rainy day when you haven't done any shopping for weeks... Try not to electrocute yourself, cuemaker.

3) Save yer hamfest/swapfest price tags. The best storage location is on new, expensive gear. You do that to prevent theft... See, says right there that cuemaker's fancy ole wirefed argon 1000 amp TIG welder is only worth $5, so no sweat. Hide the tags if she's preparing for a rummage sale.

4) Educate yer spouse with the "obvious" knowledge, that the bigger something is, the cheaper it must be, just like cell phones or american cars or obsolete laptops. Never bring up the topic of diamonds, foreign sports cars, or metal lathes and mills, of course. That giant welder of cuemaker's? Heck they must have paid him to haul that large of a beast away.

5) Hoard lots of bulky garbage. Look at my hideous collection of mildewed Mouser electronics catalogs (like 1/2 a cubic foot each) and I've got like 20. Hey honey, I got rid of that pile of grungy old catalogs, and found space for a teeny tiny little oscilloscope that takes up like 1/10 the space of those old catalogs. So, cuemaker has a new hobby, see, of collecting old semi truck engine pistons, cause they're pretty and shiney and they make nice paperweights... Course after SWMBO notices them, he might get rid of them, freeing up some floor space for that relatively tiny welder.

I can neither confirm nor deny the existence of any of these techniques. Sorry if I gave away any secrets.

Evan
05-25-2010, 12:23 PM
No need to be that devious. I buy something and put it in the garage shop where my wife never goes. Then I wait for a day when she comes home and (with somewhat guilty look) shows off some new item for her hobbies or some new outfit she has just bought. Then I mention that I just recently bought X as well and the guilty look is replaced by relief and everybody is happy. :D

RB211
05-25-2010, 02:57 PM
I grew up in Berkeley and spent many a fine day at the Golden Gate Live Steamers facility in Tilden Park.

http://metalshopborealis.ca/pics/steamsrbl.jpg

I am a member of the Golden Gate Live Steamers. I know they moved to Tilden Park in 1971, before that in Redwood city. Small world. What are the details about the picture you posted? Can you give a location? Would be interesting to see what it looks like today.