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hwingo
05-28-2010, 02:12 PM
For all practical purposes, my winter project is complete. I still need to finish the stock and put a finish on all bare metal. But it has been fired 36 times and all is doing well.

This is a single shot, bolt action. The parent case is a full length 50BMG necked down to a .416. I had Pacific Tool & Gauge to fabricate a match reamer (tight neck). I am shooting Lehigh solid brass, 416 gr bullet having a BC nearing 1.0. The barrel blank was fabricated by Benchmark using a single point cut (1:12 twist). Barrel length is 34 inches weighing 14 pounds and is chrome moly. I am nearing 230 gr of H869 powder with no signs of excessive pressure (yet). Using 204 gr of H869 (starting load) velocities were in excess of 3200 fps. Approaching 229 grains of H869 I realized slightly over 3500 fps. Unless pressure takes a jump, I am thinking that around 231 gr of powder I should either approach or exceed 3700 fps.

The rifle sports a 8X32 Night-force scope topped off with a Barrett BORS. I have 30 minutes of angle on the scope mounting system which barely allows me to sight the rifle at 100 meters. Using BORS and the angled scope mount, I should be able to easily realize 3000 meters with little difficulty.

The trigger is a Jewel set at 15 oz. I fabricated the bolt from 4140 sporting three locking lugs each being an inch long. The bolt was commercially heat treated. The receiver (also commercially heat treated) is fabricated from 17-4SS also having one inch long locking lugs providing a total lock-up of two inches.

I fabricated the receiver as a right-hand bolt with a left-side loading port.

Weight is 35 pounds. It is currently shooting a wee less than a 1/2" - 5 shot group at 100 meters. There is no recoil.

http://i234.photobucket.com/albums/ee38/hwingo_2007/Completed50color2copy.jpg

Harold

hwingo
05-28-2010, 02:14 PM
Image from the port side.

http://i234.photobucket.com/albums/ee38/hwingo_2007/Completed50color1copy.jpg
Harold

Jack F
05-28-2010, 04:21 PM
Hwingo,

Beautiful job. I have never done any gun making or smithing but I have thought about it since I started metal working. How many hours do you think you have in the gun and if this is something you don't mind revealing, how much $$ do you have in it? I would love to try something like this before I expire.:rolleyes:

Jack.

jugs
05-28-2010, 05:16 PM
Super job Harold.

Alphawolf45
05-28-2010, 05:36 PM
I've built several, several guns. .That one is extremely impressive..Excellent pictures too, howd you get rid of the background?

davidh
05-28-2010, 07:30 PM
would that be a snipers gun ? im not at all gun savy . . . .

JCHannum
05-28-2010, 08:52 PM
Very impressive and a well thought out build. Congratulations on a job well done.

Bob Ford
05-28-2010, 11:03 PM
Well done! If the barrel is good the action looks solid enough that you should get great long range accuracy. I really like the scope base, have done this with some of my single shot rifles.

Bob

Ken_Shea
05-29-2010, 12:07 AM
Harold, you have spared little expense, and have the results to show for it.

Absolutely fantastic!

hwingo
05-29-2010, 09:55 AM
Good Morning Guys,

After posting the images, I set my jaw to making some reloading aids. However, before getting into that I will try to answer some questions.

Regarding cost to fabricate the "Wingonator", I wish that question had not been asked. After adding everything up, I was taken back. I never realized how much I had invested.:eek: A very quick tabulation indicates that I have invested approximately $5670.00 in scope, BORS, rings, barrel blank, reamer, wood for stock, trigger, and muzzle break not taking into consideration cost of heat treatment or cost of raw metals for receiver and bolt.

The second major expense was tooling. Though I had a very nice Super Spacer, I had to purchase a small Universal Indexer to cut 48 degree camming angles on the bolt's locking lugs and the receiver's internal locking lugs. Aside from that, carbide inserts and carbide milling cutters were forever broken at a rapid pace thus requiring new cutters. Living in Alaska does have a down side ...... shipping cost. At times I was impatient and I requested various things to be shipped either over-night or 2nd day delivery. That, in itself, extracts a pound of flesh.

Just a quick estimate would likely bring the total somewhere around $6000-$6500.00. I took my time (~1 year), trying my best to think out each move before fabricating a piece. Often I would fabricate various elements in aluminum before finalizing in 4140 or 17-4. Believe it or not, fabricating the receiver and bolt head was a thought provoking process ...... and time consuming too! I broke 8 new 3/16 long carbide Atrix cutters (one after another) before the tri-lobe bolt head was completely divided. I didn't have that problem in aluminum.

Regarding the images and a white background, the background was accomplished using Adobe CS2. These are poor images and I was reluctant to even post them. I captured these images using a digital camera (NIKON D2X) and available light. I have a photographic studio and ordinarily I use my large format camera (SINAR F2) to capture my images on film but I had a weak moment and used the D2X. Using table-top lighting and the SINAR, I can produce superior work as compared to lesser cameras, e.g., Hasselblad or NIKONS because the SINAR has fully articulated movements. Maybe, when I get off my butt, I will produce some REAL images of the “Wingonator”.

Davidh asked, “Would this be a sniper gun”? I suppose it could be but this is certainly not my intent; I fabricated this rifle for competitive shooting (punching holes in paper from long distances).:)

Thanks to all for viewing my posts and all the positive comments.

Harold

pogo
05-29-2010, 01:48 PM
Very nice. I've been accumulating raw material and making tools for a couple years to do a 50 BMG build myself.

It is turning into a more difficult project than I imagined.

Jack F
05-30-2010, 02:39 PM
Harold,

Thanks for the reply. Well, for sure I won't be trying to produce one of these guns.:eek: If I ever do try to make a gun it will be one that costs a whole lot less.:D Once again, beautiful work.

Jack.

Boucher
06-05-2010, 05:44 PM
Harold:
The Varmint Hunters Association used to have a long shot of the year contest. It looks like you have a good prospect for entering that contest.
Very nice looking rifle!

Cobbler
06-06-2010, 01:17 AM
would that be a snipers gun ? im not at all gun savy . . . .

Nope... this would be Harold's gun.:D

Nice work Harold. Do you have any photos of your operations/set-ups during the build process? I'd sure like to see how you went about some of these steps of the build.

hwingo
06-06-2010, 02:13 AM
Nope... this would be Harold's gun.:D

Nice work Harold. Do you have any photos of your operations/set-ups during the build process? I'd sure like to see how you went about some of these steps of the build.

I photographically documented a large percentage of this build. During the last phase I basically stopped shooting images. I also did a lot of drawing in the initial phase so as to help me remember each step and why I did what I did during different stages.

My next build will be either a 338 Cheytac or a 375 Cheytac. For the most part my receiver is finished. Will send that off, along with the bolt, to get heat treatment.

Harold

motorcyclemac
06-06-2010, 07:59 PM
Did you use glass bedding under the receiver? I thought I saw a hint of it there by the back of the receiver.

Cheers
Mac.

hwingo
06-06-2010, 08:56 PM
No, I used steel bed under the entire receiver and barrel (a material similar to "glass bed" but filled with steel). When machined it turns bright as if you have milled stainless steel.

Harold

Forestgnome
06-14-2010, 06:37 PM
Great job! Have you machine bolt action receivers before, or is this your first? It's something I've been contemplating myself. Did you use any reference material to plan the build?

hwingo
06-15-2010, 06:04 AM
Great job! Have you machine bolt action receivers before, or is this your first? It's something I've been contemplating myself. Did you use any reference material to plan the build?

I have fabricated *one* in the past. Regarding reference material, I used none. For this build I entirely relied on the knowledge and skill of a wonderful Alaskan friend. In that respect, I am a most fortunate individual. My friend "held my hand" through the entire process checking off each step as I progressed. I would be remiss if I didn't also give credit to an old Special Forces buddy (living in the Lower 48) who assisted me with higher function math. With help from the two I was able to fabricate a well designed, highly accurate large caliber long distance competition rifle. Regarding the individual having walked me through this process, he is the most humble ...... and at the same time knowledgeable individual I have EVER, *EVER* met. There is NOT one arrogant bone in his body and is ALWAYS at the ready to offer assistance. He is not a formally trained machinist, rather, a retired heavy equipment operator who is highly celebrated and sought after throughout Alaska for his experience in building roads and moving earth in a most inhospitable environment.

Finally, and in no small part, I need to give credit to another Alaskan neighbor, and a member of this forum , who single handedly installed the VFD on my lathe. I really believe that my task of building this rifle would have been, at best, most difficult were it not for having a VFD. The labor and time my neighbor put into installing the VFD played a major part in completion of this rifle. My two Alaskan neighbors are the quintessential of true Alaskans and both serve as models defining the Alaskan Pioneer Spirit.

Harold

hitnmiss
06-15-2010, 12:56 PM
Wow, awesome job and way cool rifle.

You mentioned brass bullets? Do you make them yourself?

hwingo
06-15-2010, 06:35 PM
Wow, awesome job and way cool rifle.

You mentioned brass bullets? Do you make them yourself?

Hi,

Thanks for your reply. No I do not make the bullets. They are made by Lehigh Bullets and are fabricated using a CNC machine. Below is a reload on a full size 50 BMG and to the right is the solid brass bullet.


http://i234.photobucket.com/albums/ee38/hwingo_2007/416-50CAL.jpg

hwingo
08-04-2010, 09:08 AM
Well, it is now complete. It shoots a "bug hole" at 300 meters. During "break-in", I fired 10 shots and then brushed and patched the barrel until clean. I repeated this process with every ten rounds over the course of 200 rounds. As break-in progressed, my groups became tighter and more consistent. Five shot groups at 300 meters are easily covered with a quarter. For the most part, three shot groups are easily covered with a nickel. If weather permits, I will fire at 1000 and 2000 meters this weekend.

Harold


http://i234.photobucket.com/albums/ee38/hwingo_2007/NewGun416-50BMG.jpg

Bob Ford
08-04-2010, 10:00 AM
Very nice something you should be proud to use and show.

Bob

Jack F
08-05-2010, 01:02 PM
Good lord Harold,

What does your shoulder look like after 200 rounds:eek:. Beautiful Job.

Jack.

neilca
08-05-2010, 03:26 PM
What is the muzzle brake you used?

hwingo
08-06-2010, 09:05 AM
Hi Guys,

Bob: Thanks for viewing and commenting. I'm excited about this firearm's performance.

Jack: I didn't mean to imply that I shot non-stop until I deemed the barrel to be broken in. I have but only 20 cases currently made up thus I would fire 10 at the range, clean at the range, fire the last 10 and go home to clean and reload. Break-in was over the course of a month or so. In passing the rifle doesn't kick. I realize this may sound strange to some but there is practically no recoil. I cringe when discharging my 300 Win Mag because it has significant recoil but the 416-50 WINGONATOR is quite tame in comparison. Much of this has to do with weight of the rifle (35 pounds) and the muzzle brake (which provides a great deal of assistance).

Neilca: The brake is Barretts's and is titanium.

Harold

Eric D.
09-18-2010, 06:41 PM
This may be a dumb question but do bullets made on a CNC Lathe fly better than the cast ones? Is there some co-efficient that I am not aware of at play?

Jim Shaper
09-18-2010, 10:53 PM
This may be a dumb question but do bullets made on a CNC Lathe fly better than the cast ones? Is there some co-efficient that I am not aware of at play?

The co-efficient of dollars over performance outcome nullification. The more you spend, the better it must intrinsically be no matter the real results. :D

hwingo
09-19-2010, 10:04 AM
This may be a dumb question but do bullets made on a CNC Lathe fly better than the cast ones? Is there some co-efficient that I am not aware of at play?

For the most part, bullets having a high ballistic coefficient (nearing a BC of 1 or having a BC greater than 1) "fly better" than those with less BC. I can't say that projectiles made on a CNC machine fly better than those cast or pointed-up using custom bullet or commercial dies because bullet shape, as well as velocity, play a significant role in the flight of a projectile. Other factors play into this as well. e.g., twist rate. It's likely that a cast or jacketed bullet having a poor BC, and being duplicated on a CNC, will fly just as poorly at long distances. I do recognize that copper jacketed bullets, as well as cast bullets, are rated for various specific maximum velocities ...... as are all bullets. If maximum velocities are exceeded, the bullet may "blow apart" during flight. The solid monolith CNC fabricated bullet used in this rifle, is rated for greater speeds (which this rifle can produce) than ratings for cast or copper jacketed bullets. I would hate to see my muzzle brake fly into pieces due to a disintegrating bullet.

Unless one uses gas checks on cast bullets being fired at rather high velocities, leading of the barrel will occur and it's a pain in the butt to clean a barrel fouled with lead. Been there, done that, and got the Tee-Shirt.

I think that high BC projectiles are best appreciated when competing at long distances (1000 meters and greater) because they have less tendency to pitch and yaw during flight. A better flying bullet helps to produce a better score.:) I can't really see how a low-BC-hunting-load would play a significant role at 50 or 75 yards. Then again ..... maybe I am wrong. Those with far greater knowledge of BC will certainly be a better source of information than I.

Harold

Bill Akins
10-05-2010, 04:23 PM
Absolutely beautiful! Fantastic job.



.

Boucher
10-05-2010, 08:46 PM
Food for thought 3700 fps in a 1 in 12 twist bbl is 3700rps X 60 sec. = 222,000 rpm. Small gas turbine impellers are larger in diameter but they are destructively tested at 90,000 rpm. They are tested in a vacuum chamber lined with 2 inch thick steel. The impact looks like the curl on a wave frozen in time.