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torker
06-01-2010, 07:21 PM
Well...they are machines too...for "machining wood"...LOL!
I've gotten back into it yet again...about the 5th time I think.
I'm prettying up my house to hopefully sell it this time around.
I've done this before...bought a bunch of used/new woodworking equipment to fix a place up then sell the stuff when done.
Just bought a Dewalt hybrid cabinat saw. Not as nice as the Unisaws I've owned but not too shabby either.
Got a BB 8" jointer. Not as nice as the last DJ20 I had...but it works pretty darn good anyway.
Just bought a King 12 1/2" planer. Not bad for the $239 on sale price.
But...the thing I get the biggest kick out of again...is using a razor sharp hand plane...or pulling curls off a board with a plain old hand scraper.
Ah...so theraputic!
Building some very pretty cabinets for the bath right now. Local pine that had lots of pretty reds and light blues along with a bit of purple. Makes for some very nice stuff.
Have no shaper now so I just made a raised panel door with a table saw.
It worked out very well actually.
OK...OK...back to makin chips...wood chips that is...
Russ

Your Old Dog
06-01-2010, 07:41 PM
Count me in with a full wood working shop. Speaking of plaines, you got a "low angle block plain" yet? Makes your knees sort of whimpy when you hear the s w i s s s h sound it produces. If you ain't got one, you need one ! LOL

Keep in your mind if you're going to work wood it's addictive and while wood is cheaper then metal, things happen much faster :D You can turn a chunk of wood into scrap and dust much faster then steel thereby making it an expensive hobby!!

wierdscience
06-01-2010, 08:19 PM
I got just about every woodworking machine I want except for an Oliver Straight-o-plane and haven't had time to use any of it in years:(

andy_b
06-01-2010, 08:26 PM
I got just about every woodworking machine I want except for an Oliver Straight-o-plane and haven't had time to use any of it in years:(

I use my woodworking machines every day! I sometimes use them for tables, and sometimes for shelves, and sometimes for step stools, and sometimes for supporting long cutoffs, and.... :)

andy b.

saltmine
06-01-2010, 08:29 PM
What's wood?

That's the nice thing about woodworking. Your mistakes can go into the fireplace.

Steel is forever.

Deja Vu
06-01-2010, 08:31 PM
I dabble a little bit with wood:
http://www.freewebs.com/jmnotions2/bed-chair%20parts.jpg

Lew Hartswick
06-01-2010, 08:36 PM
I have about 45 years of woodworking to only about 15 of metal.
The wood working tools haven't been excersied much lately. :-)
...lew...

Duffy
06-01-2010, 08:41 PM
I have been working wood for over 40 years, only been playing with metal for about 10. My shop is actually two rooms, (with overflow into two others!) One is woodworking and the other is for metal. I do cheat though; the floor drill press, 6x48, and 6x80 belt sanders are in the wood shop.
Right now I am building a new cabinet set to hold a flat screen TV. It has to fit in with the existing wall unit, all in red oak. This is five feet long and seven feet high.

torker
06-01-2010, 08:51 PM
Count me in with a full wood working shop. Speaking of plaines, you got a "low angle block plain" yet? Makes your knees sort of whimpy when you hear the s w i s s s h sound it produces. If you ain't got one, you need one ! LOL


Ray..I have a low angle wooden plane I made years ago.
It's really hard to get it set up right but when you do...it is amazing.
I "tried" to have a hi end wood shop at one time..
The snobby kind...all hand cut dove tails...wooden planes, lotta hand work..
But...nobody wanted to pay me for my snobbery... :D
So, I bought many machines and made much better money LOL!

Frank Ford
06-01-2010, 08:52 PM
What's wood?



It's a composite, vaguely like graphite fiber/epoxy, but it's cheap. The stuff literally grows on trees!

CCWKen
06-01-2010, 09:23 PM
If you're into changing metal into something useful, I can't see how you'd get by without some woodworking tools. As short on space as I am, I still keep woodworking machines/tools handy. How else can you make casting molds, forming rollers, spinning forms, hammer forms, antique car bodies, precision tool storage boxes, etc. I added a 12 1/2" plainer to the arsenal a couple of years ago. Don't know how I got along without it for so long.

I have a machine shop to support the auto restoration shop so why not a wood shop too. I keep the bear minimum around: Table Saw, Band Saw, Cross-cut/Miter Saw, box full of hand saws, Wood Lathe, Plainer, Router, Accessories, Tooling and stuff that pulls multi-duty like the Drill Presses, Belt Sanders, Buffers and clamps. Oh yeah, the clamps. No shop is complete without 40-50 clamps of all sizes and forms--Minimum!

gwilson
06-01-2010, 10:51 PM
I have both a machine shop,and a woodworking shop. I use my vertical mill for milling out mortices,squaring up the ends with a chisel later,when my wife wants something like a HUGE dining table :)

For many years I was only interested in guitar making,but began to assemble a machine shop in 1974.

Dan Dubeau
06-01-2010, 11:36 PM
Bought my tablesaw, and planer when I was 18, and before I had a wife to ask "what do you need that for?" added on since then. it's all been in my parents garage for 10 years, used at various times as tables, and a first available flat surface :D . looking forward to the end of the month when we move and I can set it all up in my own garage.

we've got a "woodworking" shop in our condo building (only reason I was duped into moving into the city). It's barley passable, and I gave up on it except for the odd time or two. very frustrating to have to spend an hour setting stuff up, for 20 minutes worth of work. Example, when we moved in, I took the time to go over all the tools, and square up and align everything. Aligned the tablesaw trunion to the mitre slots with an indicator, fence, blah, blah. Went down this past weekend to rip some closet doors, and notice it off 1/8" from the front of the blade to the back? fence was true to the slots, but trunion was off. blade was something else too.

Been putting off building an nice machinist chest for a couple years now out of some 8/4 cherry that my uncle milled before he passed. Looking forward to completing it this winter. I love woodworking first, but the metal stuff pays the bills.

Tony Ennis
06-02-2010, 12:03 AM
I'm slightly less newbish with wood than I am with metal.

A chessboard (http://tony-stormcrow.blogspot.com/2009/10/i-finished-another-chessboard.html), I didn't make the set.

darryl
06-02-2010, 01:22 AM
In my home shop woodworking and metalworking go hand in hand. I've cut pretty much every material commonly available on my table saw. I cut through some pretty thick cast iron some months back, and I routinely cut aluminum. Sometimes the same blade gets used for wood, plastic, rubber, al, foam rubber, styrofoam-

I just gave away my woodworking lathe and chisels to a friend. I used it so little that it became pointless to keep it, and this fellow will use it.

I added a belt/disc sander to my collection of tools, and that sees almost all materials as well. The latest tool to come in is the tabletop jigsaw. It's a nice German made one, very solid and quiet. No blade on it yet, but I'd like to be able to contour in sheet aluminum and stainless. Haven't looked for a proper blade yet, but a rod type with the appropriate grit on it might be good for that.

Astronowanabe
06-02-2010, 02:31 AM
woodwork is ok ... except for the sneezing part.

Frank Ford
06-02-2010, 02:58 AM
I find it helpful for me to think of various woods as I learn to machine metal.

Aluminum is kinda like pine - soft and apparently easy to cut, but gummy and problematic unless your tools are good and sharp.

Brass reminds me of Honduran mahogany - it can grab but it's stable and solid, predictable and elegant.

Cold rolled steel - well, that's maple - lots of internal stress, and for sure it will take off and bend where it wants to go.

303 Stainless - takes a while to learn to get a good cut, just like ebony, but it makes a fine presentation with no finishing needed but a good polish.

Titanium is Brazilian rosewood - best to know what you're up against, that's for sure.

Gary Gill
06-02-2010, 07:44 AM
Several years ago, I was making a living (just barely) as a custom furniture and cabinet maker. I switched to mechanical designing and prefer metal working to wood working now.

garagemark
06-02-2010, 07:58 AM
I'm a woodworker first, machinist wannabe second. Inherited an entire shop of woodworking tools from the early 50's over twenty five years ago. All my stuff is serious cast iron, not plastic. I cannot even move the lathe without mechanical help (like two people and an engine lift!)

I have simply grown bored with wood for the time being.

I can manipulate wood into almost any shape with ease. I wish I could do the same with metal.

Someday maybe......

BWS
06-02-2010, 08:33 AM
Full-on wood shop here,makes money.........high profits with minimal investment(at least thats the goal).The trick is in design,don't try to reinvent a wheel........look to the past for designs that have stood the "tests" and are still desireable.I'm knee deep(meaning its being managed very well/easy)into a Craftsman period rehab.Its been interesting doin the research.HOW it's stood the test of time is extremly interesting.

Lots of artwork......then hit research books.....manage a little on the biz side......then go shave some wood.


One of the coolest things produced from our shop is Traditional archery gear.The bow limb laminations get ground to .0002's tolerance.Which is very difficult to say the least.We have climate control and the machine shop serves as a major support system to these endeavors.Its not a mass produced thing,its neat because it crosses alot of "traditional"(sorry)lines WRT metal world vs wood vs composites.It has been an eye opener in that you need to adress all the above,guitars are VERY similar in this respect.

We don't have a "glamour" shop,oh its neat as a pin and is based on some pretty highend shop design......its not glamour in that this is a pro-shop pay'in its own way.Having said that,I do see where the doctor and lawyer crowd can derive great relaxation/pleasure from a wood shop.....even if its a bit superflous.BW

old-biker-uk
06-02-2010, 04:22 PM
'Nuther one here (son of a carpenter).
Mostly turning, whittling and the odd bit of joinery.
Frank's assessment of wood types is spot on.

Mark

Greg Parent
06-02-2010, 05:37 PM
Metal and wood are nice....I need to find someone willing to machine some G10-FR4 Garolite.

RTPBurnsville
06-02-2010, 06:15 PM
Started with a complete woodshop filled with most everything. A couple years back knocked out a wall and added metalworking and cnc equipment. Would like to add metal casting next. :)

Robert

dvbydt
06-02-2010, 07:27 PM
Most of my family have "a pot that Ian made". Here are some that I kept.

http://i757.photobucket.com/albums/xx213/dvbydt/Engineering/WoodenPots.jpg

Also a bass guitar with a mahogany/aluminium composite construction.

http://i757.photobucket.com/albums/xx213/dvbydt/Engineering/Bass_Guitar.jpg

IanR

davidh
06-02-2010, 07:46 PM
ken,. sounds exactly like my setup. too many tools ? naaaaa, just not enuf time....................:confused:



If you're into changing metal into something useful, I can't see how you'd get by without some woodworking tools. As short on space as I am, I still keep woodworking machines/tools handy. How else can you make casting molds, forming rollers, spinning forms, hammer forms, antique car bodies, precision tool storage boxes, etc. I added a 12 1/2" plainer to the arsenal a couple of years ago. Don't know how I got along without it for so long.

I have a machine shop to support the auto restoration shop so why not a wood shop too. I keep the bear minimum around: Table Saw, Band Saw, Cross-cut/Miter Saw, box full of hand saws, Wood Lathe, Plainer, Router, Accessories, Tooling and stuff that pulls multi-duty like the Drill Presses, Belt Sanders, Buffers and clamps. Oh yeah, the clamps. No shop is complete without 40-50 clamps of all sizes and forms--Minimum!

JoeCB
06-02-2010, 08:01 PM
I natural and most beautiful marrage of your woodworking and metal working skills is in building a rifle, either muzzel loader or modern breach loader.... you get to use ALL of your tools.

Joe B

andy88
06-15-2010, 02:17 AM
wow that guiter is looking so awesome, what wood workign tool you used ?
---------
woodworking equipment (http://www.woodworkingequipments.com/)

darryl
06-15-2010, 02:45 AM
Just got back into woodworking to pay the bills. I hope it does. Four working days into the new job now- built a set of dovetailed drawers in maple, lacquered, looks nice. Got a composite of my own now- a mixture of lacquer, powdered maple, and snot :)

dvbydt
06-15-2010, 05:59 AM
wow that guiter is looking so awesome, what wood workign tool you used ?
---------
woodworking equipment (http://www.woodworkingequipments.com/)

Andy,

A friend did the tapered mahogany on a table saw with a sliding, angled fence. The body was two pieces and mostly hand done. All the rest of the machining was done with a turret mill.

IanR

wooleybooger
06-15-2010, 10:45 PM
wood and metal, both are equally enjoyable to me. i must admit that since starting my Brillo pad making hobby i havent given much time to renewing my compost heap. neither is a money making enterprise for me, i do it because i like to.