PDA

View Full Version : Looking for design concept suggestions for a simple oil pump.



Boucher
06-02-2010, 07:00 PM
I do a fair amount of fish frying in 4-6 gallon cast iron pots and consequentially need to filter the oil to remove residual corn meal. The small commercial pumps made for this cost $20-$25 and do not last very long. The bigger problem is that they are nearly impossible to clean after they are used.

The filtering is not a problem. The short women’s stockings from the dollar store are cheap, effective and disposable.

I need to pump 2-3 gallons of vegetable oil (warm not hot) at a rate of about 2 gpm. There is very little pressure needed. Basically transferring from one container to another at near the same elevation.

The pump needs to be easily cleanable.

The commercial versions use a small impeller. I have also been thinking along the line of a simple auger inside a tube.

This could be driven by anything from a cordless drill to a direct coupled DC motor and batteries.

What are your suggestions?

winchman
06-02-2010, 07:37 PM
How about the standard drill pump? This one has a removable cover to make cleaning easier.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61dqR6zR%2BBL._SL500_AA300_.gif

http://www.amazon.com/WAYNE-WATER-SYSTEMS-56678-WYN-Drill/dp/B000BQNW1C

darryl
06-02-2010, 09:38 PM
Stainless steel tube about 4 inches diameter, smooth inside. D shaped handle on a rod carrying a piston with a seal on it. Man powered. Base plate has flap valves on it, and input and output tubes. Stainless tube mounts over base plate. Pull handle to fill, push down to empty. HSM project.

macona
06-02-2010, 09:41 PM
Look at the powered cooking oil filters. I believe they use a gear pump.

gmatov
06-02-2010, 11:26 PM
If you are looking to make one, I can't help you. If you are looking to buy something better than the ones the people who sell turkey cookers, 25 bucks each, and one of which I bought my S'inlaw that didn't even work for one transfer, look at the 8 buck HF model, here:

http://www.harborfreight.com/multi-use-transfer-pump-66418.html

I don't know if it would be suitable for cooking use, plastics and all. I would imagine that pumping soapy water through it would do an efficient job of cleaning it.

Cornmeal might get under the valve and make it less than efficient.

Just a thought.

Cheers,

George

EddyCurr
06-03-2010, 01:28 AM
I do a fair amount of fish frying in 4-6 gallon cast iron pots and
consequentially need to filter the oil to remove residual corn meal. The
small commercial pumps made for this cost $20-$25 and do not last very
long. The bigger problem is that they are nearly impossible to clean after
they are used.

I need to pump 2-3 gallons of vegetable oil (warm not hot) at a rate of
about 2 gpm. There is very little pressure needed. Basically transferring
from one container to another at near the same elevation.

The pump needs to be easily cleanable.

This could be driven by anything from a cordless drill to a direct coupled
DC motor and batteries.

What are your suggestions?I propose using a positive displacement gear pump such as the oil pumps
used for automotive applications.

These have the volume capacity required, are suitable for handling hot
oil and can tolerate some foreign material, plus they are cheap and easy
to source.

Taking the SB Chev pump as an example, easy cleaning can be facilitated
by exchanging the capscrews that attach the coverplate for the gears
with wing bolts or thumbscrews. The small amount of material to be handled
makes it unlikely the replacement fasteners would loosen with vibration.

The pump could be mounted to a stanchion that extends down from the
bottom of a lid that fits your cast iron pots. A suitable stanchion might
be already available from an aftermarket supplier like Moroso - these are
sold for the purpose of lowering the oil pump when a deep sump pan is
used. An OEM intermediate shaft (the shaft that drives the pump from
the distributor) could pass up through the pot lid where it could be driven
by a cordless drill.

The outlet of the pump or stanchion could be tapped for an NPT or
other thread in order to attach a hose.

.

darryl
06-03-2010, 01:55 AM
Just a thought- maybe what you need is a centrifugal type pump so no chunkies or whatnot can jam anything up. This would be sort of like a vehicular water pump. In fact, maybe one of those could be made to work. Direct drive from a 3600 rpm motor using a flexible coupling. I've seen some that were pretty small, but of course you'd need to create the 'base' for it, with whatever fittings would be needed.

These are made to be lubricated by the pumped medium- at least some were. The warm oil would be fine for that. The other factor is food safe- what materials would be a no-no-

Then there's the prime factor- would any of the pumps suggested require a prime before they would work?

Some description of how the pumping has to be done would help. For instance, would you have to hand hold the pump, how do you need to control the hoses, etc.

MickeyD
06-03-2010, 02:14 AM
A simple pump to build is a peristaltic pump. Wikipedia has a good description here - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peristaltic_pump .

Lew Hartswick
06-03-2010, 11:27 AM
A simple pump to build is a peristaltic pump. Wikipedia has a good description here - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peristaltic_pump .
From the cleaning standpoint it would be great. I have worked on
a lot of them but all the ones I've been exposed to wouldn't have
the "required" flow rate. It may be possible to scale up and reach
that flow. They wont "self prime" so that may make the start-up
a bit tricky.
...Lew...

gnm109
06-03-2010, 12:03 PM
I do a fair amount of fish frying in 4-6 gallon cast iron pots and consequentially need to filter the oil to remove residual corn meal. The small commercial pumps made for this cost $20-$25 and do not last very long. The bigger problem is that they are nearly impossible to clean after they are used.

The filtering is not a problem. The short women’s stockings from the dollar store are cheap, effective and disposable.

I need to pump 2-3 gallons of vegetable oil (warm not hot) at a rate of about 2 gpm. There is very little pressure needed. Basically transferring from one container to another at near the same elevation.

The pump needs to be easily cleanable.

The commercial versions use a small impeller. I have also been thinking along the line of a simple auger inside a tube.

This could be driven by anything from a cordless drill to a direct coupled DC motor and batteries.

What are your suggestions?


Procon makes pumps for all types of fluids. They are often available on eBay at low prices. I have one on my welding cooler. They are extremely well made, reliable and come in all sizes. One could easily be driven by a DC motor.

Circlip
06-03-2010, 12:16 PM
Syphon, no moving parts (except the oil), easy to clean.

Regards Ian.

Boucher
06-03-2010, 03:33 PM
I appreciate the variety of input. MickeyD thanks for the link on the Peristaltic pump. If I could adapt that to easily change the tube and just throw it away rather than try to clean it that would be my first choice. I will probably try several of these Ideas as I have time. I will try to post some pictures along the way.

dr pepper
06-03-2010, 08:08 PM
You can get cheap pneumatic pumps designed to pump paint that come to bits with a couple of wing nuts, if you have air then this is a possibility.

ulav8r
06-04-2010, 01:04 PM
Use a 2 quart sauce pan as a dipper, then when the vat is nearly empty pick it up and pour it. Or just make a frame to hold the filter material and scoop the cornmeal out without using another container at all. Use your fabricating time for something more interesting.