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Gary R
06-03-2010, 12:20 PM
I need to replace a tine shaft on a rototiller. The company wants $75.00 for the replacement. (TO MUCH!!) The shaft has a welded sprocket that shows very little wear and can easily be salvaged. My question is what alloy to use.

Would 1060 be a good choice?

Gary R

moe1942
06-03-2010, 02:07 PM
Nothing special about that shaft. A piece of CRS or HRS will do just fine.

Oldbrock
06-03-2010, 02:41 PM
I'd use a piece of 1045 T&G Peter

Al Messer
06-03-2010, 02:44 PM
I'd use a piece of 1045 T&G Peter


Salvage an old drive shaft from an auto or truck. Don't spend good money when you can scrounge your raw materials!

strokersix
06-03-2010, 03:04 PM
I've recently discovered the wonders of 1144 stressproof. High yield point, machines like a dream. May be tough to find for cheap though.

duckman
06-03-2010, 04:39 PM
Al Messer did you mean an axle a drive shaft is just a hollow tube.

Bguns
06-03-2010, 04:46 PM
Wonders of 1144 Stressproof..

Sulfur and phosphorus.... Extremely detrimental to weld quality...

Not an ideal steel for welding a sprocket on.... Only Low hydrogen rods, peening, and post heat treat at 1120 degrees or so...

Just like the leaded steels, if it machines easily, you are giving up other desirable properties

strokersix
06-03-2010, 04:56 PM
OP didn't say sprocket was welded to the shaft.

True you don't want to be welding 1144. 1060 or similar may cause welding problems too.

Bguns
06-03-2010, 05:00 PM
Quote "The shaft has a welded sprocket that shows very little wear and can easily be salvaged. My question is what alloy to use."

:)

strokersix
06-03-2010, 05:03 PM
OK, OK. I pictured a hub/sprocket welded assembly then pinned or otherwise fixed to the shaft. Like ag machinery often uses.

Uncle O
06-03-2010, 05:19 PM
Nothing special about that shaft. A piece of CRS or HRS will do just fine.


Agreed....

Gary R
06-03-2010, 05:59 PM
Sifting through the endless supply of knowledge on the net I see that 1060 is used in valve springs.....that is way to hard. I also came across 1040 being used as axles so that seems about right.

CR and HR are slag covered are they not? I guess could buy a size larger and whittle it down to clean itup.

This is a White Roto Boss 550 from about 1995 era.
http://www.partstree.com/parts/?lc=white_outdoor&mn=214-447-190+Roto+Boss+550+%281994%29

It had a tough life. I do not believe it spent one winter undercover. Most of the problems are from neglect. I had to burn the cords/ribbons/wire/etc. off of the tiller shaft before I could work on it. The bearings once had seals but they where long wore away. The engine carb was full of varnish but once I cleaned it up the 5 hp Briggs ran like a top. No smoke and good compression.

Completely salvageable. More tiller than I need, but for the $50 I payed for it it will do nicely and it will have a good home.

I have a small vertical mill and a small lathe so I can carve out what I need to make it work.

My other on going project is a 1965 Corvair engine that is being converted to an aircraft engine. I also do my own gunsmithing. I shoot long range varmint rifles. 22-250 223 308 243 270 all in bull barrel.

Gary R.

Uncle O
06-03-2010, 07:25 PM
The Cold Rolled (CR) should be clean, the Hot Rolled (HR) will have some scale to it.

deltaenterprizes
06-03-2010, 07:42 PM
Grade 8 bolt is cheap and readily available.

doctor demo
06-03-2010, 07:59 PM
Salvage an old drive shaft from an auto or truck. Don't spend good money when you can scrounge your raw materials!
Al, they don't use solid drive shafts inside torque tubes any more:D .

Steve

RobbieKnobbie
06-03-2010, 11:34 PM
Gr. 8 bolts will be tough to weld - and expensive to find something big enough to make up a shaft with.

Higher carbon steels (1045 et al) are used for machinery shafts and spindles, but that's a whole different application than this. T&G (ground) is probably overkill too.


The original shaft was probably low carbon steel and that'll be your best bet for a replacement. Most likely hot rolled.

Gary R
06-04-2010, 02:16 AM
The only reason I think that the shaft is harder than CR or HR is the way it eat in to the bearing.

The shaft is 1" and is .996 on one side and .984 on the other.The bearings took a woopin. Really oblong. .125 or better. Of course they could be made of some really soft stuff. (sleeve) The wear is the worst on the side that the rubber dust/dirt cover was ground off.

I see the consensus is falling in to the HRS slot so that is what I will order.

This is a GREAT Group and I thank you all for your input. I belong to only a few groups on the net. To many "Yahoo's" with opinions that belong else where. Everyone here had use full input. I appreciate that. You must have great monitors to keep this together.

Thank you all.

Gary R.

Gary R
06-08-2010, 09:26 PM
Well the HRS A36 shaft arrived today I had ordered 1.125 and will turn it down to 1" Good thing I did because it has a pretty good bow in it. Maybe to much to let me get away with this.

Gary

Gary R
08-08-2010, 06:06 PM
The shaft is done and installed. I ordered new bearings and seals for it and welded the old sprocket on.

Now another problem.

The drive wheels are rusted to the axle. I have tried heat and soaked them in penetrating oil of all sorts. I drilled holes in the wheel itself to mount a puller on it. That started to bend the rim so I quit that.

I now have a plastic bottle mounted to the outside and some sodium carbonate in the water and will try to use Electrolysis!!

Anyone have an idea?

The sleeve on the rim that is mounted over the axle is about 4.5 inches long
and seems to be rusted the entire 4.5 inches

Maybe this electrolysis will work I have change the electrode 4 times
along with water and each time it was covered with rust.

I have used this method to clean heavy copper out of a gun barrel and
it worked on that.

I saw else where on the net that you could use it for rust removal.

But I am open to other ideas the wheel is just as bad on the other side


Gary R

GKman
08-08-2010, 06:25 PM
The shaft is done and installed. I ordered new bearings and seals for it and welded the old sprocket on.

Now another problem.

The drive wheels are rusted to the axle. I have tried heat and soaked them in penetrating oil of all sorts. I drilled holes in the wheel itself to mount a puller on it. That started to bend the rim so I quit that.


The sleeve on the rim that is mounted over the axle is about 4.5 inches long
and seems to be rusted the entire 4.5 inches


Gary R

I fought the same thing once. I improvized a puller by welding two bolts (with heads cut off) parallel to the shaft on the outside of the tube with the threaded ends extending well past the end of the shaft. With a suitable cross bar across them and a slug to the end of the axle, tighten nuts to pull. Weld the bolts to the rusty tube hot and heavy. It will stretch the tube and loosen it. Cut off when finished. Rusty remains can be seen on either side of shiny hex head bolt and nut.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v494/gkman/P8080004.jpg

Gary R
08-09-2010, 11:51 AM
Unless I cut the rim off I have no where to weld the bolts. I was just out and checked the electrolysis it seems to stop where the sacrificial piece gets all crudded up. So I changed it out and the bubbles started again. THis is not supposed to remove any steel. If it is removing the rust it only has the small gap between the shaft and the steel tube to work, tight! Bubbles came out of there when I could see (the water is now cloudy) If bubbles where coming out then new liquid should be moving in. This maybe a long process.

Gary R