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Waterlogged
06-04-2010, 11:51 AM
I have no idea what these were used for and was just curious. Anyone have any ideas? Body is solid brass, about 5" long and wrapped in a cardboard like outer sleeve. Caps are brass with lead (or similar) in ends.

http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f165/drewlp/tubes.jpg

MichaelP
06-04-2010, 12:18 PM
IEDs?
:o :o

Tony Ennis
06-04-2010, 12:31 PM
Where are the threads on the cap?

The notches in the body make it look as if it is screwed using a bar into a receptacle of some sort.

Does the other end come off too?

JCHannum
06-04-2010, 12:32 PM
That was originallly a renewable cartridge fuse that has had the slots for the tabs filled with solder to convert it into a small parts or tool holder.

Alan Smith
06-04-2010, 12:33 PM
What it looks like to me is the container that was used in the old fashioned department stores to send cash and receipts backwards and forwards between the accounts office and the counters. Cash was stuffed in the container, end screwed on and container was loaded via a valve arrangement into a pipe network with a vacuum applied to it.

Having said that the lead in the caps does not make sense, would have thought the containers would have to be light weight.

Deja Vu
06-04-2010, 12:34 PM
A fuse replacement shunt for maximum amps....:confused:

Deja Vu
06-04-2010, 12:37 PM
What it looks like to me is the container that was used in the old fashioned department stores to send cash and receipts backwards and forwards between the accounts office and the counters. Cash was stuffed in the container, end screwed on and container was loaded via a valve arrangement into a pipe network with a vacuum applied to it.

Having said that the lead in the caps does not make sense, would have thought the containers would have to be light weight.
I thought he said the body was "solid" brass. so, it is a tube?
Then maybe a repairable/adjustable fuse.:confused:

I love these "what is it" threads.

Waterlogged
06-04-2010, 01:23 PM
It is hollow in the middle with screw on endcaps. My first thought was that it was an old fuse of some kind but I have no idea how it would have worked as such. I seem to remember that my dad had something similar about 30-40 years ago.

Deja Vu
06-04-2010, 01:30 PM
I WAS going to say some sort of "dead blow" hammer for a hand holding/filling...but the lead is recessed so that possibility is out.

john hobdeclipe
06-04-2010, 01:40 PM
If the body is brass all the way from one end to the other, then it's definitely not a fuse. But if it is brass ends on a cardboard tube, then I'm inclined to think it's a holder for a replaceable fuse element.


What it looks like to me is the container that was used in the old fashioned department stores to send cash and receipts backwards and forwards between the accounts office and the counters. Cash was stuffed in the container, end screwed on and container was loaded via a valve arrangement into a pipe network with a vacuum applied to it.

Hey, I remember those. The Stone & Thomas department store in Wheeling, West Virginia had a similar system but it used some sort of guide system of wire guides and cables or cords, not vacuum. Hard to remember in great detail, that was over 50 years ago and I was but a wee tyke.

Waterlogged
06-04-2010, 02:40 PM
I looked at it again after the comments. There is a break in the metal on the inside which I hadn't noticed previously so there is NO electrical connection from end to end. Confirmed it with a voltmeter. Assuming it is a fuse, what would have been on the inside to conduct electricity?

Bguns
06-04-2010, 02:47 PM
Looks kind of like a Cap (blasting style) container...

Brass and lead for non spark...

If a fuse with the guts out, it should not conduct from end to end...

Bob Ford
06-04-2010, 02:54 PM
J C Hannum is right. The notches in the threads held the fuse. The idea was to replace the fuse not the whole thing. They are still common in high voltage. Look up on any pole above the transformers and most likely you will see a open air version.

Bob

kyfho
06-04-2010, 03:32 PM
Definitely a fuse body. Used them all the time at previous employer. Different amp rated links available to fit a common body. Google "renewable fuse links" to see an assortment.
Not sure what it has been converted to, though.

Don Young
06-04-2010, 10:32 PM
It appears to be a renewable fuse body. There were originally brass washers that fit into the ends with tabs into the notches so they would not rotate. The washers had narrow slots in the middle and a ribbon-like fuse link connected them. The ends of the link were bent down flat against the washers and the caps screwed on to hold it all together. They were/are very common in industrial electrical systems because of the economy of replacing only the links when they blew.