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View Full Version : Please show me your Bridgeport lifting pictures



hornluv
06-08-2010, 01:29 AM
Does anybody have some good pictures of your Bridgeport or similar mill being lifted? I want to get mine off the pallet I made for it but the engine hoist I have just won't lift it high enough (the back side comes up but the knee side stays down). I'm trying to lift it with lifting straps around the ram wrapped up in a basket type weave. Every other weave I've tried ends up being too long and I run out of travel on the hoist. I don't have a suitable eye bolt for the lifting point, but I'm going to look for one tomorrow. I don't have a forklift or anything like it. I can't imagine I'd be able to use one anyway as my ceiling is low. Any other ideas?

Thanks,
Stuart

Shuswap Pat
06-08-2010, 02:42 AM
Use a chain with a grab hook, then you can choke everything up. Use rags to protect the machine from the chain. It should balance with the table close in and the ram out about 6" - sling between the head and the columun,on the ram. That's how I moved my XLO

Pat

EVguru
06-08-2010, 08:03 AM
Ok, I didn't move it in one piece, but here's how I moved my BP clone;

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=36287&highlight=long+chang

RWO
06-08-2010, 02:30 PM
I had the same problem when I got my BP. My shop had an 8' ceiling covered with acoustic tile. I put a 4' piece of 4" sched. 40 pipe over the ceiling joists over the mill, knocked the tile out and used a chain hoist between the pipe and a lifting sling made from 1" nylon rope placed under the head. Caution! my ceiling joists were 2x10 on 16" centers and the lifting point was only 4' from a load bearing wall. A civil engineer gave his blessing to lift the mill from the spot as the pipe bridged 4 joists. They didn't even creak when I lifted the mill.

RWO

metalmagpie
06-08-2010, 02:36 PM
Does anybody have some good pictures of your Bridgeport or similar mill being lifted? I want to get mine off the pallet I made for it but the engine hoist I have just won't lift it high enough (the back side comes up but the knee side stays down). I'm trying to lift it with lifting straps around the ram wrapped up in a basket type weave. Every other weave I've tried ends up being too long and I run out of travel on the hoist. I don't have a suitable eye bolt for the lifting point, but I'm going to look for one tomorrow. I don't have a forklift or anything like it. I can't imagine I'd be able to use one anyway as my ceiling is low. Any other ideas?

Thanks,
Stuart

If you lift from a forged 5/8-11 eyebolt threaded solidly into the ram, you should be able by moving the ram and the knee back and forth to get the lift perfectly balanced. And the hook on your engine hoist should grab the eyebolt directly. Be sure the legs on your hoist are fully extended all ways and locked. I partly crumpled an engine hoist once lifting a Bridgy. I was lifting it off a trailer and only got it a fraction of an inch up when it dropped, so it wasn't too bad, but I almost had to change my shorts.

Another idea is to use a 4-ton portapower kit like this one:
http://tinyurl.com/2ehfjej

to lift the back of the ram and then slide some long strips of sheet metal as far under as you can, then skid the mill off onto stacks of pieces of flat stock until you get it supported on its own, then pull out the pallet. Then you can use your hydraulics to take out a piece or two at a time until it's low enough so you can get the last one with a long prybar under either the front or the last notch. Move it into place by skidding or by using pieces of pipe. You can lift the front with a prybar and you can lift the back using the portapower with extensions.

metalmagpie

hornluv
06-08-2010, 04:44 PM
Well, I got it off the pallet this morning. I found a lifting eye at Fastenal and used that. It took a while to get it balanced and when I did the engine hoist would not lift the mill. It's a two ton hoist and it petered out at one ton. Go figure. Anyway, it took enough weight off the pallet that we could shimmy it out with the help of some hammers. Then I got it on the floor as fast and gently as I could. I used my pinch bar and some black pipe to get it the rest of the way. I took some pictures of where the ram and table were at the balance point. I'll post those a little later.

Thanks everyone,
Stuart

Boucher
06-08-2010, 11:28 PM
I used the forged lifting eye. Put a Shackle pin thru the eye. A heavy safety hook caught the Shackle. A 2 heavy nylon sling was used in a basket around the top ways and thru the safety hook as a safety back up. The seller used his forklift to bring the mill out of his building to the paved parking lot. I had a 6T Smeal well service rig and that was used to pick the mill up about five feet. The 20 ft Gooseneck trailer was backed underneath the mill and the mill lowered into position. The mills bottom leveling holes were used as guides to drill holes thru the floor of the trailer and four bolts installed. Safety chains were run to both sides of the trailer from the lifting eye.

The process was reversed when I got it home. My shop ceiling is ten foot but the door is only eight, and my forklift is too tall to get in the door. I have a metal pallet that I put on the forklift and set the mill on that. The metal pallet was leveled with the shop floor and 3/4" pipe was used to roll it off and into position.

The well service rig that I used will lift 6,000 lb. single line. It is limited to four feet behind the bumper with full loads but can boom back about twice that with Bridgeport sized loads. The point of this is that well service rigs are often available in rural areas at a reasonable service rate. They are better suited to moving things like our shop equipment than things like wreckers.

Nothing upsets me like seeing good equipment ruined by dropping it or turning it over.

Weston Bye
06-09-2010, 12:53 PM
Ok, I didn't move it in one piece, but here's how I moved my BP clone;

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=36287&highlight=long+chang

I moved mine in approximately the same manner as EVguru, except that I removed the knee from the base. I photographed all the steps and will be writing up the process in case *someone else* has to move the mill out in the future.

Tobias-B
06-10-2010, 01:01 AM
Another idea is to use a 4-ton portapower kit like this one

oooscaryyyy... the porto- power and knockoffs really aren't for lifting!
And the HF ones are soemtimes terrifying in their machining...

I used a pair of dead old spansets around the arm to move my clone-
they gave their all, but did the job just fine. I choked them right up tight,
and they worked well. Wish I'd taken a pic- we got it 18" up to lift onto
my car trailer. With a 2 ton engine hoist.

Weighs significantly more than the #2200 lb car, according to my tow rig!

heh

t