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View Full Version : Ceramic Knife Blades For Deburring/Deflashing



Liger Zero
06-08-2010, 10:44 PM
Has anyone tried them? Do they work? Last longer than those stamped cheap-ass utility-knife blades?

Boucher
06-09-2010, 01:14 AM
I just take an old triangular file and grind the file ridges off and work it to a point and sharpen the edges. I cut it to a convenient working length and install a wooden dowell handle. This works for most of the things I debur but I also have a couple of the commercial versions. Being old and set in my ways, I do more of this sort of work with files rather than scrapers.

Evan
06-09-2010, 01:58 AM
LZ,

I assume you mean deburring and deflashing plastic? If so then DX just got in a line of ceramic knives for about 1/4 the cost of buying the same thing here.

Here is one for under $9.00.

http://www.dealextreme.com/details.dx/sku.28780

Liger Zero
06-09-2010, 05:49 AM
Yep that's what I'm talking about.

Question is do they live up to the hype?

Davidhcnc
06-09-2010, 06:21 AM
...and how to sharpen them. They laugh at my diamond stones.

Evan
06-09-2010, 10:31 AM
Question is do they live up to the hype?


For 9 bucks and no shipping how about you tell us?

Peter N
06-09-2010, 12:22 PM
They work very well on glass or mineral reinforced plastics, but not so well on softer more flexible materials like Polyethylene or Polypropylene.

This one is about 10 years old and has trimmed literally 10s of '000s of glass-filled parts.

http://www.btinternet.com/~p.neill/Docs/Ceramic_2.jpg

As you can see from this picture of the edge it's not sharp, but is in fact a blunt square form. You might also note that there is no wear on it.

http://www.btinternet.com/~p.neill/Docs/Ceramic_3.jpg

Here's a pic of a GF Polyester molulding I just used it on to illustrate how it cuts, and you can see where it has turned the radiused edge into a more uniform chamfer-like edge, complete with a little curl of material. To be honest you use it with more of a 'scraping' action rather than a 'cutting' action and pull it along towards you. It's intrinsically safe for operators and completely avoids the 'dig-in' you can sometimes get with craft blades on plastic.

http://www.btinternet.com/~p.neill/Docs/Ceramic_4.jpg




Peter

Black_Moons
06-09-2010, 02:01 PM
Thanks peter for the indepth awnser with photos.
Did'nt know some where not actual blades but rectangles, but that makes a lot of sense.

What do you like to use on softer plastics like polyethylene if ceramics are better for harder plastics?

Liger Zero
06-09-2010, 05:14 PM
I just ordered several styles. I do GF nylon and polycarb they should work good for that

I have a rubber job I am running now, I was going to try them on that job but then I had a flash of OMFG AWESOME INSIGHT and built a deflashing tool. Don't need to worry about the hollow-mill-on-a-motor anymore either. :D

RKW
10-16-2010, 08:59 PM
LZ, what did you get and how did they work? I was also considering some for plastic since they are supposed to work better. I was just waiting on your evaluation/review.



I just ordered several styles. I do GF nylon and polycarb they should work good for that

I have a rubber job I am running now, I was going to try them on that job but then I had a flash of OMFG AWESOME INSIGHT and built a deflashing tool. Don't need to worry about the hollow-mill-on-a-motor anymore either. :D

Liger Zero
10-16-2010, 09:11 PM
Haven't had time to evaluate them. I'll try one out Monday Morning and let you know.