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DeereGuy
06-13-2010, 03:24 PM
Well for years I have been wanting to try and I am finally getting set up. I have a low tech paint booth (see pic below) and a donated kitchen oven to get me going. What are some of you using for hangers and how are you haning them in the ovens? Pics would be cool...

http://picasaweb.google.com/114432358211615370283/DropBox?authkey=Gv1sRgCKDw7e6u2_GgLw#5482290476500 016306

Dr Stan
06-13-2010, 04:09 PM
Quite similar to one I built from plywood. The only major difference is that I put a sloped V bottom in the booth to collect and reuse the powder. You may want to consider using a mask while coating.

For hangers I simply used custom hooks made from coast hangers or O/A welding rod.

DeereGuy
06-13-2010, 04:43 PM
Thanks Dr...I have a mask and plan on hanging a plastic bag below the parts in the booth. I am looking at a little more techy kinda of booth for the future.

Circlip
06-13-2010, 05:23 PM
Do you need a specific manufacturers cardboard box or will any type do??

Regards Ian

DeereGuy
06-13-2010, 06:02 PM
What are you doing still up???? I think the high tech one will need to be a specfic brand. I suppose a proper google search is in order.:))

gnm109
06-13-2010, 07:22 PM
This may not be directly applicable to your particular oven setup but I use trolleys in my 2'X3'X6' home-built powder coat oven. There is an upper trolley and a lower trolley. They have a number of 3/8-16 nuts welded in to hold bolts and redi-rod studs upon which to either hang or support items. I spray the items with powder outside and then, when the oven is heated, I open the door and roll the trolleys in. It works for me.

Perhaps you could install some rails in either the top or bottom of your oven and roll the items in after coating them?

Lower trolley:

http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r188/gnm109/OvenPhotos006.jpg

Upper trolley.

http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r188/gnm109/OvenPhotos005.jpg

DeereGuy
06-13-2010, 09:56 PM
gmn, thanks for taking the time to post your pictures. I take it you are using this for parts that have an uncoated surface and no doubt I will have some of those to do. How do you handle situations that require all the surfaces to be painted?

gnm109
06-13-2010, 10:11 PM
gmn, thanks for taking the time to post your pictures. I take it you are using this for parts that have an uncoated surface and no doubt I will have some of those to do. How do you handle situations that require all the surfaces to be painted?


Hello.

As you mention I only use this for items that have been stripped to bare metal, either by machining, chemicals or with bead blasting. I then coat them completely with powder except for holes that are plugged with hi-temp plugs or surfaces that need to be kept clear with hi-temp tape. Sometimes, I will use a scrap bolt to plug a larger threaded hole to keep the powder out.

I built the oven larger so I that I could do an occasional motorcycle frame but have only used it for smaller parts so far. I probably could have done with a kitchen oven initially, but I may need the capacity later on.

I'm not quite clear on your reference to "all the surfaces to be painted". I do nothing further once the parts are powdercoated so there is no painting done. If something were to be painted, I would just prime and paint. Please clarify the painting reference. Thanks.

:)

PeteF
06-14-2010, 12:05 AM
A cardboard box is just fine when powder coating, if everything is setup correctly you'll have a lot less "over-spray" than you may be used to with painting. The biggest eye opener for me was just how LITTLE air pressure is needed. For small jobs you just want the powder almost "wafting" out, bigger jobs you can crank it up a bit more. If using a cardboard box remember the part needs to be earthed to the same earth as your gun system. In the picture shown I can see a part suspended by a steel wire, hanging from a steel rod, but can't see that rod earthed in any way. Remember that the gun charges the powder which will be attracted to an earth (hopefully your part). If the part isn't earthed for some reason then it won't attract the powder. My oven is miniscule so I'm often coating with the parts on racks. After each session I run the racks over the linisher with a scotchbrite belt to remove the excess baked on powder. If I don't, the powder on the racks insulates the parts from ground. Finally, yes you could apply the powder outside but it would want to be absolutely dead calm with no breeze at all. The powder is like talc and very easily blown around, if I'm doing small parts with the pressure turned right down even a slight breeze will affect the powder application, too much pressure simply wastes powder and on some jobs you don't want reused powder (it picks up dust and contaminants no matter how carefully you gather it).

I'm real interested in more details in more pictures and details of shop made ovens as I'm desperately in need of a larger oven.

Pete

Mcgyver
06-14-2010, 12:24 AM
not a topic i know much about - the powder coating is applied electrostatically ? how long a bake and at what temp?

is this pretty much the same as the process used in industry?

one more Q, how thick does the coating end up being

thanks :)

Dr Stan
06-14-2010, 12:37 AM
not a topic i know much about - the powder coating is applied electrostatically ? how long a bake and at what temp?

is this pretty much the same as the process used in industry?

one more Q, how thick does the coating end up being

thanks :)

Yes it is an electrostatic process. The powder is charged in the gun and the negative lead is attached to the item to be coated. You usually bake it at 350 for about an hour, just like a cake. BTW, one needs to use an electric oven, not a gas one. Seems there are some flammability issues with a gas oven.

It is essentially the same as the industrial process, just on a smaller scale. I don't remember the thickness of the coating.

It's a relatively inexpensive process to set up and also very easy to use. I'm going to use our old electric oven and buy a HF powder coater as all the home versions are Chinese, even the ones from the auto refinishing catalogs. I set one up at my former school and used a welding rod oven. Worked great.

Be aware the powder is very messy. Make sure you do not track it into Mama's house. :eek:

PeteF
06-14-2010, 12:46 AM
Yep electrostatic, that's why the part needs to be earthed. I'm not sure if it's exactly the same used in really big plants, but if you mean places where you may send parts out to be powder coated then yes, just the scale is different. I bake at 200C for about 15 minutes after flow out.

Thickness, cripes now you've got me! I know how thick the conventional paints I spray will go, but not powder coating, sorry. With conventional spraying you typically would spray a primer then a number of finish coats. Indeed the spraying I do is even more than that as it would typically involve spray fillers too. Powder coating is a one step process, so the final film is typically thinner than conventional, say enamel, finish. However it is EXTREMELY tough. It's a lot more difficult to "build up" like conventional paints can be. Basically once the part is fully loaded with powder, that's it, you can get more on, but not infinitely like a spray gun. Powder coating is just fantastic in my opinion, no more heavy areas, runs or curtains, not to mention isos and stinking solvents to worry about. Once the parts come out of the oven they cool then they're good to go.

Getting into it doesn't need to be expensive at all. Check out the systems as sold by Eastwood http://www.eastwood.com/ I use one of their systems through a 230-115v transformer here in Oz.

A couple of caveats, PC CANNOT be applied over any conventional finish, the paint will boil/peel/nuke itself during baking and screw up the PC finish. Also the powder fumes are slightly toxic while curing and they say will contaminate an oven, so no slipping it into the kitchen oven while wifey is out :D

Edit: oh I see we posted at the same time. Good thing we said the same things ;) Oh one exception I don't find it messy at all, much less so than spraying that's for sure. I think people run too much air through their PC guns in which case yes it will blow this fine powder EVERYWHERE. But if you're careful you can apply it at low pressure and there's virtually no mess at all. Sometimes I will just throw a rack on my welding bench (steel) and PC it right there, the steel bench attracts all the over-spray! The best thing is the clean-up. Powder can be reused, but picks up crap with it, so maybe not for "show" jobs, so any excess gets put in a container. Meanwhile the gun etc just gets blown out with air (outside), sure beats 15 minutes of stripping and cleaning a spray gun!

Dr Stan
06-14-2010, 12:52 AM
PeterF,

Either I'm up too late, or your up early. It's 10:50 Central time here.

BTW, one of my most memorable port calls while in the USN was at Perth. ;)

Loved Swan larger. :D

Stan

PeteF
06-14-2010, 12:59 AM
Hey Stan, you're up late as it's 14:00 here :D

Perth is a beautiful city, it's become like my second home as I'm always there for work. Sadly the mining boom has made it quite expensive.

Dr Stan
06-14-2010, 01:08 AM
Hey Stan, you're up late as it's 14:00 here :D

Perth is a beautiful city, it's become like my second home as I'm always there for work. Sadly the mining boom has made it quite expensive.

Wasn't very expensive when I was there, but being on the USS Coral Sea CVA-43 and visiting during a celebration of the victory of the Battle of the Coral Sea seemed to have something to do with that. :D

We'd been on Yankee Station for 45 days and participated in the rescue of the Mayaguez. So we had a fair amount of pay in our pockets especially since we didn't have to pay income tax plus we received combat pay. :D

Still fondly remember a little bar named Miniski's (sp?) in between Perth & Freemantle near a woman's college. :D

gnm109
06-14-2010, 01:21 AM
Powder Coat as applied by Harley-Davidson on their bike frames, at least one tube on my sidecar frame is approximately .008 thick. The tube is nominally 1.5" and with a digital caliper, it measures 1.516 more or less.

The 200 deg. C mentioned above is about what I use. (375 to 400 deg. F). I notice that the cannisters in which the powder is sold usually have a recommended temperature marked on the side. I find that a half hour will do the trick. I have two windows in the top of my oven and two interior lights so that I can watch things.

I've used Eastwood powders and they are fine but the H.F. materials also work very well.

Some people get very detailed on control systems for their ovens. They use PID digital control units and also Solid State Relays. So far, I've gotten by with a simple oven thermostat and a large definite purpose contactor. It's has done 500 degrees under test and will maintain 375 deg. F. plus or minus five degrees with no problem. That's plenty good enough for my needs. There is an oven thermometer inside one of the windows so i can keep an eye on the temperature. I'm planning on getting an IR thermometer as well.

Here's are a couple of pictures of the control box last year when I was finishing up building it. That's 6 ga wire feeding the contactor. I use four wires per code. I'm pulling 50 amps so that's just under 12KW with four home oven elements.

I got my plans from a site that is no longer up but most any sized oven can be built from 20 ga. sheet metal and metal studs with rock wool insulation like I did.

http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r188/gnm109/PowdercoatOvenControl001B.jpg

http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r188/gnm109/PowdercoatOvenControl001A.jpg

PeteF
06-14-2010, 02:09 AM
Excellent, thanks for that. I was thinking of PID simply because I've used them before and it gives the oven temp as part of the install.

I just use an infrared thermometer from HF, I think it's very handy to check what the temps of the parts themselves are doing. Do you have any pics of the oven itself as that's what I'm most interested in. Something to scale it with would be terrific if not too much trouble? Thanks for reminding me about it needing a window!

BTW is the crinkle finish on your controller an Eastwood PC? I recently did a cover on an old induction motor using that powder and it looked very nice.

Circlip
06-14-2010, 05:17 AM
No one mentioned Epoxy or Polyester coatings and Black for outdoors applications or gloss and Matt levels?

Will probably catch up at the weekend Bob.

Regards Ian.

gnm109
06-14-2010, 09:27 AM
Excellent, thanks for that. I was thinking of PID simply because I've used them before and it gives the oven temp as part of the install.

I just use an infrared thermometer from HF, I think it's very handy to check what the temps of the parts themselves are doing. Do you have any pics of the oven itself as that's what I'm most interested in. Something to scale it with would be terrific if not too much trouble? Thanks for reminding me about it needing a window!

BTW is the crinkle finish on your controller an Eastwood PC? I recently did a cover on an old induction motor using that powder and it looked very nice.

The top panel on the controller is a piece of pebble grain ABS that's available from a local plastics shop. I use it quite a bit. I made my main board inside with phenolic sheeting that I bought years ago at a surplus store.

Here are some pictures of the oven to give you an idea of the size. It's pretty big....

The framework is steel 2 X 4 studs. The inside and outside are covered with 20 ga. galvanized sheet metal. There are four oven elements inside on the base. The insulation is rock wool. The oven is held together with 3/8-16 bolts and nut plates. It could be disassembled into 6 pieces if necessary.


Basic framework.

http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r188/gnm109/Oven5.jpg

Top framework showing rockwool and window placement.

http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r188/gnm109/PowederCoatXXX003.jpg

Completed oven. The control box is on the side.

http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r188/gnm109/OvenPhotos001.jpg

DeereGuy
06-14-2010, 10:33 AM
No one mentioned Epoxy or Polyester coatings and Black for outdoors applications or gloss and Matt levels?

Will probably catch up at the weekend Bob.

Regards Ian.
Great catching up with you on Skype during my drive into work this morning. Gotta love technology! I am pretty sure the HF powder is suitable for use outdoors. My micrometer stand is the first part I am going to do in flat black once the Eastwood gun arrives.

DeereGuy
06-14-2010, 12:10 PM
I'm not quite clear on your reference to "all the surfaces to be painted". I do nothing further once the parts are powdercoated so there is no painting done. If something were to be painted, I would just prime and paint. Please clarify the painting reference. Thanks.

:)
I wasn't very clear on that, sorry. I will try to get to my shop this evening and post a pic. I was wondering how I was going to plug the threaded holes and will use your suggestion on bolts for now. I don't have the silicone plugs. I also read where some are using tin foil. I picked up a oven thermometer and have the HF infrared one. I also have a blasting cabinet so I think I am ready to give it a go once the PC gun arrives...

Circlip
06-14-2010, 12:43 PM
Great catching up with you on Skype during my drive into work this morning. Gotta love technology!

Just bloody showing off now aren't you.

To let others into the "Black" secret, for external finish, Polyester powder is the one to use, Epoxy black is affected by UV and goes grey and then lighter shades so yer bike frames need coating with Black Polyester if you go down that route BUT cables need to be well fastened down as they can rub through the coating due to vibration.

Another masking agent used is the paper variety used in masking for paint spraying. Also good in "Blasting"

Temperature is reasonably critical as, if I remember correctly, a 15 degree spread makes the difference between a gloss or a Matt finish.

Don't set fire to the shop Bob.

Regards Ian.

DeereGuy
06-14-2010, 01:59 PM
Just bloody showing off now aren't you.

Regards Ian.
Of course..:)...but I didn't mention that I was on my Droid using Blue Tooth for the headset.:)

On another note I called Eastwood to get a tracking number and found out that they back ordered the gun and shipped the bloody mask...6 to 8 weeks for the gun...so I promptly asked them to stuff the gun order and forget the mask also...seems they already have the mask coming UPS....yet right..

The local HF store has one in stock and they are on sale for $59.00 so I will probably stop by to pick it up tonight.

gnm109
06-14-2010, 06:41 PM
I wasn't very clear on that, sorry. I will try to get to my shop this evening and post a pic. I was wondering how I was going to plug the threaded holes and will use your suggestion on bolts for now. I don't have the silicone plugs. I also read where some are using tin foil. I picked up a oven thermometer and have the HF infrared one. I also have a blasting cabinet so I think I am ready to give it a go once the PC gun arrives...


The plugs work OK but they are expensive and after a few times, they look rather poorly. The high temp. tape is excellent. I have hundreds of scrap bolts that I've saved and divided by size and thread so when I have a threaded hole that's how I plug it. It's not fun cleaning powdercoat out of threads.....

I have an oven thermometer bolted just inside one of the windows and it seems to be fairly accurate.

.

Mad Scientist
06-14-2010, 08:20 PM
I have a HF gun that I bought on sale some time ago and seems to work OK for all that I have done. My original oven was a “pizza oven” this also worked well put obviously I was limited to the size of an object I could put in it. So naturally the only thing to do was build something bigger.

This is what I came up with.
http://i68.photobucket.com/albums/i17/mscientist/PC1P.jpg
The top is the powder coating booth and the bottom is the oven.

http://i68.photobucket.com/albums/i17/mscientist/PC4P.jpg
There are florescence lights just inside the front edge, a blower and furnace filter in the back so I don’t have to breath the over spray, and on the top is a variable speed gearhead motor that I hang the parts from. Thus I can rotate the parts as I am spraying. That as proved to be a very desirable feature.




http://i68.photobucket.com/albums/i17/mscientist/shop%20pictures/stx.jpg
Below is the oven with an 1800 watt heating element. Inside of oven is about 2 foot square with 6 inch of fiberglass insulation all around.

I get powder from HF, Eastwood, or Caswell plating. Caswell has the largest selection of colors. I cook the parts at 400 degrees for 30 minutes. As already mentioned put screws into threaded hole so that you do not need to re-tap. For threaded studs I will wrap them with aluminum foil. I prep all parts by sandblasting.

Powder coating cast metal can be tricky, no matter how well you think you have cleaned the part oil, moisture, etc. will be trapped in the pours. That is until you cook it and then it comes out and forms bubbles in the finish. :mad: Pre-heating at 400 degrees or higher for 30 minute or longer helps to minimize this.

For the best finish you should only use new powder, however for less critical applications I save all the over spray in a large container. This has produced some very interesting one-of-a-kind colors.

DeereGuy
06-14-2010, 09:46 PM
Mad, thanks for posting those pics. The motor on the top is a good idea, kinda like having motorized welding positioner. The element is this stove is 2400 wats. I am thinking when I get ready to build a little bigger one I can use this element and contols from this stove. I already have plenty of metal studs and some galvanized metal.

Thanks to everyone also who has taken the time to post responses. I am finding them all very helpful. Hopefully I will have some pics to post this weekend. I have several parts already blasted. I just need to do a final wipe down and they should be ready to go.

Oh..Mad...did you see a lot of difference in the HF paint verses other brands? It's pretty darn cheap at $4.99/lb

gnm109
06-14-2010, 09:49 PM
Mad, thanks for posting those pics. The motor on the top is a good idea, kinda like having motorized welding positioner. The element is this stove is 2400 wats. I am thinking when I get ready to build a little bigger one I can use this element and contols from this stove. I already have plenty of metal studs and some galvanized metal.

Thanks to everyone also who has taken the time to post responses. I am finding them all very helpful. Hopefully I will have some pics to post this weekend. I have several parts already blasted. I just need to do a final wipe down and they should be ready to go.

Oh..Mad...did you see a lot of difference in the HF paint verses other brands? It's pretty darn cheap at $4.99/lb


Yes, nice outfit Mr. Mad has.

Regarding the H.F. Powder Coat powders, they work fine. they had the primary colors the last time I was there. Nothing wrong with them at all.

DeereGuy
06-14-2010, 10:09 PM
That's good info gmn..Someday I will need colors not offered by HF...two being the JD green and yellow.:)

Weston Bye
06-14-2010, 10:17 PM
Bob,
Nice to see you're getting into powder coating, and nearby too. How's that anodized part holding up? Need anymore anodizing done? Hey, we can barter...

DeereGuy
06-14-2010, 11:09 PM
Bob,
Nice to see you're getting into powder coating, and nearby too. How's that anodized part holding up? Need anymore anodizing done? Hey, we can barter...

Hey Weston good to hear from you. I had planned on attending the seminars in Ann Arbor this month and figured I would hook up with you there. Turns out my oldest daughter had planned a backpacking trip to South Manitou island that week. Her husband, Pam and I are all going.

The part has gotten a lot of use and I think I have proven durablity with the anodizing and the design. Many thanks again for showing me the process and doing my part.

I would love to have you down some Saturday. If the gun shows up this week I will be doing some testing with it and getting familiar with the process. You can come over if you have the time.

The group here has been very helpfull with the information. I still want to try my hand at some parkerizing or blueing. I have a few tools that I have made and would like to be able to put a proper finish on them. Having the knowledge to do all three will be nice.

Edited to add once I think I know what I am doing with the PC process bring all the parts you want..:)

PeteF
06-14-2010, 11:58 PM
Excellent, thanks for the pictures guys, that should give me some food for thought. I probably don't have the space to go quite as big, but maybe more vertical with possibly a tiny electric oven fan if the temperature gradient gets too large top to bottom.

As far as the plugs, I use the silicone ones and find they can be cleaned up just by flexing them then wiping down with a solvent or even just my thumb. Alternatively I have a good collection of bolts that are now powder coated down to half their thread :D Yes it sure is tricky stuff to get off!

It's fantastic this process is available so cheaply now.

Pete

PeteF
06-15-2010, 02:37 AM
BTW Does anyone have any experience with curing via infra-red lamps or similar? I was thinking of something like an outdoor patio heater. I would like to try that before building an oven, as if it's successful it will definitely affect the size of the oven I'll aim for. Apart from being slow and tedious, since only one section is being heated at a time, I wonder about over/under curing different sections with the uneven heat?

Also, my wife will just kill me if I don't rip this kitchen range out, as I promised to take it into the workshop. I was thinking of stripping it down and using the heater etc for a PC oven. Has anyone tried this or see any reason why this shouldn't work?

Thanks

gnm109
06-15-2010, 10:54 AM
BTW Does anyone have any experience with curing via infra-red lamps or similar? I was thinking of something like an outdoor patio heater. I would like to try that before building an oven, as if it's successful it will definitely affect the size of the oven I'll aim for. Apart from being slow and tedious, since only one section is being heated at a time, I wonder about over/under curing different sections with the uneven heat?

Also, my wife will just kill me if I don't rip this kitchen range out, as I promised to take it into the workshop. I was thinking of stripping it down and using the heater etc for a PC oven. Has anyone tried this or see any reason why this shouldn't work?

Thanks


I have no personal experience with IR lamps in re powdercoating. I have read about some people doing this on the internet. The general concensus seems to be that it is extremety limited with regard to the size of the part. Additionally, it is difficult to get an even heating of the part since the heat source is directional.

In order to get nice results with powdercoating, it's absolutely necessary to heat the parts to an even temperature all of the way through and IR simply won't do that.

By the way, I'm not sure what you mean about ripping out your kitchen range.....you haven't been powdercoating in the kitchen have you? That's grounds for domestic violence if not for divorce.

I understand that some husbands who have done things like that have disappeared never to be seen again. At the very least, it makes for strange-tasting meals.........

If you do rip the kitchen range out, I suggest that you immediately replace it. We don't want to lose you like that. :)


.

PeteF
06-15-2010, 07:35 PM
I have no personal experience with IR lamps in re powdercoating. I have read about some people doing this on the internet. The general concensus seems to be that it is extremety limited with regard to the size of the part. Additionally, it is difficult to get an even heating of the part since the heat source is directional.

In order to get nice results with powdercoating, it's absolutely necessary to heat the parts to an even temperature all of the way through and IR simply won't do that.

By the way, I'm not sure what you mean about ripping out your kitchen range.....you haven't been powdercoating in the kitchen have you? That's grounds for domestic violence if not for divorce.

I understand that some husbands who have done things like that have disappeared never to be seen again. At the very least, it makes for strange-tasting meals.........

If you do rip the kitchen range out, I suggest that you immediately replace it. We don't want to lose you like that. :)

Ha ha, no powder coating in the kitchen oven I promise, see my warnings above. No I wanted a small oven in the workshop so promised my wife I'd replace the kitchen one. Of course it's too good to throw away. What to do with it. Hmm .... oh I know :D

I've seen IR lamps sold for PC and the book on PC I got with my kit suggests that's a way you can basically coat and cure a part of any size but not sure how well that works in practice.

Pete

gnm109
06-15-2010, 10:11 PM
Ha ha, no powder coating in the kitchen oven I promise, see my warnings above. No I wanted a small oven in the workshop so promised my wife I'd replace the kitchen one. Of course it's too good to throw away. What to do with it. Hmm .... oh I know :D

I've seen IR lamps sold for PC and the book on PC I got with my kit suggests that's a way you can basically coat and cure a part of any size but not sure how well that works in practice.

Pete

A kitchen range makes an excellent powder coating unit. I would have no interest in the IR process......I can't imagine doing large parts with it.

Additionally, the part is exposed when heated with IR. That's not good. I don't think that would be as safe as having the hot party confined in an oven.

When I'm finished powdercoating, I shut the power off and open the door. I don't go near the parts until they are cool to the touch.


.

PeteF
06-16-2010, 12:31 AM
The books say you need to move the IR lamp around but I can only imagine that it would be difficult to get even heating for each of the spots, hence why I wondered if anyone had actually tried it. Apparently it takes much longer to heat the area the lamp is focussing on too, and as you mention the part is exposed all the time with uncured powder just sitting there. Doesn't sound like a recipe for success to me.

On the other hand, if somebody says they've used the IR lamps to cure I agree a kitchen oven may be enough. I'm using a smaller oven at the moment and find that severely restricts what I can do. I have an application pending right now, where I would like to powder coat some steel balustrade supports, and at around 1000 mm long it would take a reasonable big oven, more like the ones pictured above, to take anything that long. It could just prove to be the impetus to make a bigger oven ... but oven making minus balustrade installing = unhappy wife

Here's some IR lamps Eastwood sell for the purpose http://www.eastwood.com/hotcoat-powder-coating/curing-lamps.html

gnm109
06-16-2010, 09:46 AM
The books say you need to move the IR lamp around but I can only imagine that it would be difficult to get even heating for each of the spots, hence why I wondered if anyone had actually tried it. Apparently it takes much longer to heat the area the lamp is focussing on too, and as you mention the part is exposed all the time with uncured powder just sitting there. Doesn't sound like a recipe for success to me.

On the other hand, if somebody says they've used the IR lamps to cure I agree a kitchen oven may be enough. I'm using a smaller oven at the moment and find that severely restricts what I can do. I have an application pending right now, where I would like to powder coat some steel balustrade supports, and at around 1000 mm long it would take a reasonable big oven, more like the ones pictured above, to take anything that long. It could just prove to be the impetus to make a bigger oven ... but oven making minus balustrade installing = unhappy wife

Here's some IR lamps Eastwood sell for the purpose http://www.eastwood.com/hotcoat-powder-coating/curing-lamps.html

Eastwood is getting $400 to $1,200 for what? A lamp and a metal rack....?

For that kind of money you can build a custom powdercoating oven and put it into your shop.

Note the first picture on the left, It's a motorcycle frame being powdercoated by an IR lamp. That's going to take a lot of heat and it will have to be moved constantly and the results may be questionable.

It's also going to heat the surrounding area. Do you move the part or the lamp? At what point do you have even heat? Either way will give inconsistent results. No thanks.

bborr01
06-16-2010, 11:20 AM
I seem to recall seeing someone using powder coating with IR lamps to powder coat a refrigerator.

IR lamps might be good for coating something that cannot be baked.

Brian

DeereGuy
06-16-2010, 01:49 PM
Just and update...as things go, I ended up ordering the gun, and a few accessories through HF instead of picking it up at the local store....just got word that expected delivery date is the 22nd for the gun, and no ETA yet for the accessories...lol...go figure..:eek:


Oh well...gives me more time to get the Honey Doo's finished and a project the neighbor dropped off yesterday completed....

"who am I kidding....the honey doo's are never really finished...."

PeteF
06-16-2010, 07:16 PM
Thanks Brian I think flat panels like would be ideal, I'm a little surprised nobody has come up here as having actually tried it, I might see if I can track down a finishing forum and place a question there. I've tried to search the answer in the past but mainly came up with industrial application where IR is sometimes used as I recall.

I agree the commercially available IR lamps as sold by Eastwood do seem terribly expensive. Since I'm in Australia (on 230v) they're no good to me anyway. I was thinking of buying an outdoor patio heater and trying that, but even they aren't exactly free. Down here it is, of course, winter, so I guess a new IR "workshop heater" could be purchased in the name of science :D


Just and update...as things go, I ended up ordering the gun, and a few accessories through HF instead of picking it up at the local store....just got word that expected delivery date is the 22nd for the gun, and no ETA yet for the accessories...lol...go figure..

I guess you already have the order in with HF? Otherwise I can recommend Eastwood. I've only used them once but the service was very good. In my case the freight to Australia was going to cost almost the same as the kit (postage out of the US is very expensive) so there were many emails back and forward trying to work something out.

DeereGuy
06-16-2010, 07:40 PM
I guess you already have the order in with HF? Otherwise I can recommend Eastwood. I've only used them once but the service was very good. In my case the freight to Australia was going to cost almost the same as the kit (postage out of the US is very expensive) so there were many emails back and forward trying to work something out.

Pete, I started this thread with the intention of ordering from EW...however after ordering the gun and a respirator mask I called the next day to find out if they had any idea of when the shipment would arrive....I found out then that the gun was on back order and he couldn't give me a date of when they would have more...so I cancelled the gun order and when through HF instead for one.

gnm109
06-16-2010, 07:46 PM
Pete, I started this thread with the intention of ordering from EW...however after ordering the gun and a respirator mask I called the next day to find out if they had any idea of when the shipment would arrive....I found out then that the gun was on back order and he couldn't give me a date of when they would have more...so I cancelled the gun order and when through HF instead for one.


There's nothing wrong with the H.F. powdercoating kit and gun at all. I know several people who use them. Just make sure to test it immediately to be certain that it isn't D.O.A. LOL.

I happen to have an Eastwood but I've used an H.F. and they are OK. In any case, if Eastwood is backordered and isn't shipping, the decision is simple. I wonder what happened? Perhaps the ship got lost in Macau or Singapore Harbor. You think?

:)

DeereGuy
06-16-2010, 07:49 PM
There's nothing wrong with the H.F. powdercoating kit and gun at all. I know several people who use them. Just make sure to test it immediately to be certain that it isn't D.O.A. LOL.

I happen to have an Eastwood but I've used an H.F. and they are OK. In any case, if Eastwood is backordered and isn't shipping, the decision is simple. I wonder what happened? Perhaps the ship got lost in Macau or Singapore Harbor. You think?

:)

Apparently they went out of stock just before I ordered and didn't get the web site updated.....I just looked at the invoice and they charged me 16.95 for s&h...I am calling them now...they won't be getting any of my business again...unless they work something out.

Ok..just got off the phone with the order department...customer service was closed for the day...apparently customer service caters to the unemployed.:)

Anyway...the order department is having customer service call me tomorrow to either let me send this back for a full refund or work something else out if I want to....reasonable enough...

gnm109
06-16-2010, 07:56 PM
Apparently they went out of stock just before I ordered and didn't get the web site updated.....I just looked at the invoice and they charged me 16.95 for s&h...I am calling them now...they won't be getting any of my business again...unless they work something out.


The shipping and handling on internet sales is getting out of hand. I have a lathe and milling machine like most everyone here and I always look for deals on inserts and cutting tools. I've seen people trying to sell one TNMG insert with $4.50 shipping! They could put it in an envelope and send it for 42 cents or whatever but no, they have to have $4.50 or even more. It's ridiculous.

I even saw one guy in eBay selling a single HSS End Mill for $5.95 Buy it Now with $22.00 shipping! No thanks! I always look for free shipping first or, if I do have to pay shipping, I find out what it is first and I won't buy if it's exorbitant. Heck with 'em.

DeereGuy
06-16-2010, 08:09 PM
Yea...I know what you mean...Enco has spoiled the heck out of me with free shipping and fast service.

Racebrewer
06-16-2010, 08:37 PM
Hi,

There's a lot more out there than Eastwood or HF. Take a look at the following in Google:

NIC
Columbia
Powder-by-the-pound
Rosie's

No particular order.

John

DeereGuy
06-16-2010, 09:20 PM
Hi,

There's a lot more out there than Eastwood or HF. Take a look at the following in Google:

NIC
Columbia
Powder-by-the-pound
Rosie's

No particular order.

John

John,

I have been on the Columbia and PBTP sites but didn't know about NIC or Rosie's. Thanks for bringing those up...I will have a look later this eveing.

DeereGuy
06-17-2010, 09:30 AM
A question for those of you that have used the HF powder. How is it holding up to UV rays?

PeteF
06-17-2010, 09:58 PM
Hi,

There's a lot more out there than Eastwood or HF. Take a look at the following in Google:

NIC
Columbia
Powder-by-the-pound
Rosie's

No particular order.

John

Thanks for that John, I notice Pendry Powder Coatings is another supplier so I'll expand my options. I have a couple of Eastwood's chip cards and it's good to see what the actual colour/effect looks like, as I find it's a bit tricky to tell on my monitors, but for colours like clear and black for example it makes no difference.