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daryl bane
06-14-2010, 03:43 PM
Just got back into the hobby and I am out of date.
1) There used to be a chain lube that was sold in a metal tin, you would heat the tin up, the lube would turn to liquid. Lower the chain in and wait till it cooled. It was the best at the time and I think it was a British product. Does this still exist and is it available in the US? I thought it was called Linklyfe??
) Best other spray on alternatives? Many Thanks

Peter.
06-14-2010, 03:46 PM
That tin stuff was called link life or something. Don't know if it's still available.

I use Rock Oil chain Lube applied after riding. I steer-clear of the anti-fling chain waxes, I think they are too gummy, don't lube enough and hold dirt too easily.

bob_s
06-14-2010, 04:05 PM
Castrol GRIPPA 60S

derekm
06-14-2010, 04:34 PM
get a scott oiler...
its a gravity fed oiling device with a vacuum operated dispensing valve.
http://www.scottoiler.com/

no connection with me except I've bought at least 4 ...

EVguru
06-14-2010, 05:24 PM
get a scott oiler...
its a gravity fed oiling device with a vacuum operated dispensing valve.
http://www.scottoiler.com/

no connection with me except I've bought at least 4 ...

Or go for the cheap manual alternative. A hand soap pump dispenser and a length of tube.

A steady flow of oil to the chain will give better life than anything short of a FERC (fully enclosed rear chain) ,beloved of Aerials and MZeds.

MotorradMike
06-14-2010, 05:46 PM
If you've bought a new chain it might be an O-ring one. Each pin has O-rings on both ends to keep lube in. Applying oil or grease to these just makes dirt stick.
I put WD-40 on my dirt bike O-ring chain on the advice of someone who has laboured through the endless debates on the subject.

topct
06-14-2010, 05:57 PM
Is this an O-ring chain or a non O-ring chain?

There are lots of chains lubes out there. If you are running an O-ring chain, the product should say on the container if it is compatible for use on such a chain. Using the wrong lubricant can cause the rings to swell to the point of first a severe binding, then failure of the O-ring.

There are lubes that can be used on both. That's what I look for, then there isn't any confusion as to what I grab.

Mcruff
06-14-2010, 05:58 PM
I use the spray on anti fling stuff (Bel-ray) never had a problem and I put about 7-8000 miles a year on my bike. Sprockets and chains have always held up fine. I hate the scott oiler types as they fling oil all over the place. I clean and lube the chain thoroughly about every 2500-3000 miles and spray the chain about every 1000-1500 miles regardless.

daryl bane
06-14-2010, 06:04 PM
Non-o ring chain. 54 pan. I was hoping Linklyfe might be available, but that doesn't seem to be the case.

darryl
06-14-2010, 08:16 PM
I used to use a product called racing chain lube, I think it was from Bel Rey. That was pretty good. Now I have something called champions choice chain life. That seems to be good also. I use it on my bicycle chain as well.

I think there needs to be a distinction- is this for a street bike or dirt bike- it would not surprise me if there's an optimuum product for each category. For the dirt bike you would want to shed dirt as much as provide lube. For a street bike you would likely want the lube to shed dirt also, but it should stay in place and provide lube for a longer period of time. Maybe there's a top quality lube that does both- supposedly that's what the Bel Ray racing chain lube was.

O-ring chains- I can understand the reluctance to lube them because of the possible damage to the 0-rings, but- what kind of lube do the rings keep in? Chain lube? I think you'd want to apply an external lube anyway for the sake of the sprockets and the links. What's the point of lubing the inside of the links if you're not going to lube the outside- seems odd to me.

Jack772
06-14-2010, 09:08 PM
I have had a number of chain drive bikes and the chain was always problem. When the right amount of lub was applied it would throw it off.
A few years ago I found the perfect solution. I started buying shaft drive bikes. Works Great!

gnm109
06-14-2010, 10:08 PM
I used to use a product called Chain Wax. It's very good. I used to use it, that is, until my former Harley Shovelhead developed an excellent transmission leak that was exactly the amount required to keep the chain nice and wet. There's no sense spendng money when you don't need to.

.

gnm109
06-14-2010, 10:12 PM
I have had a number of chain drive bikes and the chain was always problem. When the right amount of lub was applied it would throw it off.
A few years ago I found the perfect solution. I started buying shaft drive bikes. Works Great!


You still need to remove your drive shaft on your shaft-driven bike now and then to lube the drive splines. I knew several Gold Wing owners who didn't do the necessary maintenance and the shafts wore loose in time. When I had my Gold Wing a few years ago, I would remove the drive unit and shaft whenever I installed a new rear tire. Honda makes a special Moly Lube for that job.

I do like a shaft-drive bike but the belt drive on my Harley-Davidson is also rather low maintenance as long as you avoid gravel roads. LOL. :)

hardtail
06-14-2010, 11:43 PM
Non-o ring chain. 54 pan. I was hoping Linklyfe might be available, but that doesn't seem to be the case.

Now that sounds like pics reqd.............

daryl bane
06-15-2010, 10:30 AM
For Hardtail, here ya go. Just doing alittle cleanup.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v417/brufsupbane/IMG_0038.jpg

KEJR
06-15-2010, 12:22 PM
Sweet bike. I've heard of guys using nickel plated O-Ring chains and just replacing them every 2-3 years. Maybe clean it and apply light oil meant for O-ring chains once a year, but I would stress not to oil an O-ring chain much, and to be careful what you use. Its not worth getting oil all over your bike's innerds and paint/chrome. I have a belt drive Buell now but will be running a nickel plated O ring on my custom bike I'm building (which coincidentally sparked this tool junky hobby I now have...).

Ken

A.K. Boomer
06-15-2010, 12:44 PM
Just got back into the hobby and I am out of date.
1) There used to be a chain lube that was sold in a metal tin, you would heat the tin up, the lube would turn to liquid. Lower the chain in and wait till it cooled. It was the best at the time and I think it was a British product. Does this still exist and is it available in the US? I thought it was called Linklyfe??
) Best other spray on alternatives? Many Thanks


Pretty sure your talking about a parrafin lube - they use it for bicycle's too - high wax content -- but you heat the tin up - put the chain in, remove the chain and let dry/cool...

Pro's; good protection - wont fling off - last long time - hard enough coating to resists most dirt.

Con's; hassle to do - don't use on bicycles in cold months or it could cause rear derailleur to wrap around bike frame:eek: - also small%horsepower consumption (on bicycle's) esp in colder temps as compared to more traditional lubes. (Needless to say - I don't use the stuff:D )

Willy
06-15-2010, 12:50 PM
Thanks for posting the pic Daryl, that's a beauty alright, nice work.

I have always had very good chain and sprocket life with minimal cleanup with the stock chain oiler on my shovel. Took a little bit of fine tuning to get it adjusted just right but I haven't had to touch it for years. Not sure, but I believe Panheads had them as well but I think they were not used until either 55' or 57'. The only difference was the oil pump I believe.

Not sure if you want to pursue that route but you can retro-fit your pan with an after-market chain oiler (http://www.jpcycles.com/product/741-065?N=274555+36367+28003753&Ntt=&Ntk=All&Ne=36365&Ns=DefaultSort&fitment=1&brand=0&results=100), however it's an option.

GKman
06-15-2010, 01:02 PM
If you use a spray can, heat and bend the spray tube at a suitable angle close to the end. Amazing how much better you can get the lube where you want it.

daryl bane
06-15-2010, 01:13 PM
Thanks for the kind words and tips. It seems that there is precious little side room for a o-ring chain, I don't think it will fit. I have redirected the crankcase vent to blow on the chain, but I might change that.

MuellerNick
06-15-2010, 01:20 PM
I put WD-40 on my dirt bike O-ring chain on the advice of someone who has laboured through the endless debates on the subject.

Good advice ... from a competitor, not a friend! :D

I still have such a pot of chain lube. From Castrol, graphited chain grease.
But you should pull out the chain while hot. Otherwise, you'd have a huge mess on your bike.

Putoline has something similar.


Nick

derekm
06-16-2010, 05:27 PM
I use the spray on anti fling stuff (Bel-ray) never had a problem and I put about 7-8000 miles a year on my bike. Sprockets and chains have always held up fine. I hate the scott oiler types as they fling oil all over the place. I clean and lube the chain thoroughly about every 2500-3000 miles and spray the chain about every 1000-1500 miles regardless.
Doing 400-800miles a week in all weathers {it rains and snows overhere and sometimes the sun shines :) ) I just fill the oil tank once a month. Clean the chain - never, just clean the bike... needless to say rust on the rear wheel is rarely a problem... The oil is ordinary 30w or iso100 viscosity oil that i use in the lawnmower, hedgetrimmer, rotavator, milling machine, lathe, shaper, bandsaw, compressor ...

Fasttrack
06-16-2010, 06:38 PM
I didn't read any mention of it, but I got a "recipe" from an old timer. Basically it is paraffin wax, but you add a dash of gear oil to it to improve lubrication. It's messy but works great for the occassional use street kart. I make no claims as to its usefulness on a bike or etc ;)

kf2qd
06-16-2010, 08:02 PM
I found it much less maintenance, trouble and mess to go to a drive shaft...

gnm109
06-16-2010, 08:33 PM
I found it much less maintenance, trouble and mess to go to a drive shaft...


They still require maintenance, however.............and it can be time-consuming, removing the "pumpkin" to get at the drive shaft to lube it.

.

smiller6912
06-16-2010, 10:26 PM
I've been using he PJ1 products for years and years on my bicycles, dirt bikes motorcycles, go-carts and anything else that has a chain, I even use it on the change gears on my lathe and the garage door wheels and it has never let me down. It goes on thin to run into the nooks and crannies and evolves into a thick tacky grease as you work it in.

http://www.sudco.com/pj1.html

John Garner
06-17-2010, 12:55 AM
daryl --

THE old-time lubricant for roller chain was a mixture of powdered graphite and tallow. The proportions and type of tallow varied from recipe to recipe; I've heard graphite : tallow ratios from 1 : 1 to 1 : 8 by weight, and have also heard claims that mutton tallow works better than beef tallow.

If you want to try rolling your own, you'll probably have to render your own tallow to start. Start with a couple pounds of beef or lamb suet, chop it finely, and cook well in a frying pan. Strain the liquid tallow, then pour it into several times its volume of clean boiling water. Stir the boiling mixture for five to ten minutes, remove from the heat, and let cool, then refrigerate. Once the tallow cake has solidified, cut it free and scrape away all of the junk on the water side of the tallow cake.

If you want exceptionally pure tallow, repeat the boiling-in-water process.

Melt the clean tallow, heating it enough to boil away all tramp water. Then stir in your powdered graphite.

To lube a bicycle or motorcycle chain with the graphite-tallow mix:

1. Clean the chain.

2. Melt the tallow-graphite mixture and immerse the chain in the melted mixture. Soak the chain in the melted mixture for 20 to 30 minutes and the remove the chain from the mixture. If possible, hang the chain over the pan of tallow-graphite and allow the chain to drain while the chain and tallow mixture cools enough to solidify.

3. Install the lubed chain on you bike.

4. Repeat as needed, usually every 2 to 4 months.

A 9-inch diameter cake-baking pan is the right size for a bicycle chain; a motorcycle chain needs a bigger pan.

John

A.K. Boomer
06-17-2010, 09:01 AM
Whale blubber can also be used in place of the tallow --- but I recommend parrafin instead ---- for one I don't like being chased by bears and mountain lions while riding my bike, can also make for a nasty seen at camp when strange critters are lapping at your chain just outside the tent...

speedy
06-17-2010, 05:16 PM
From memory. My old 58 Triumph Tbird had a small diameter bleed off line that fed the drive chain. It T'd off from the oil scavenge return line . Or was it off the rocker feed ??

daryl bane
06-17-2010, 05:19 PM
As I remember Norton Commandos, at least the early ones, had a chain oiler running off the scavenge oil return.

EVguru
06-18-2010, 06:24 AM
A fundamental question here is;

What is your riding to polishing ratio?

In my case it's probably 99:1 and the bikes only actually get cleaned before riding them to a show. The chains get a few drops of oil on the rear sprocket almost every time they are ridden and I will get oil spots on the rear wheel.

So what!

Chain life is good with adjustment not needed very often. The oil wipes off easily unlike chain lube and the dirt comes off with the oil.

Extending chain life.

Replace the front sprocket every two chains and the rear sprocket every 3 or 4. If you can flip the rear sprocket then you can get a bit more life too.

Farbmeister
06-18-2010, 07:16 AM
For all you spray and pray guys... how are you getting the oil into the pins and bushings where its actually needed?

The dip-the-chain method seems like the only thing close to getting lube into the critical friction areas.

A.K. Boomer
06-18-2010, 07:41 AM
Put bike on center stand, start and put in first gear, let clutch out,
place can of moly chain lube with spray stick nossle pointed between links right where chain is entering the bottom of the rear sprocket, this is about as good as it gets without chain removal and soaking...

Its not "spray and pray" Its spray - and then hop on your steed and do a 156mph all the way to pueblo colo.

dneufell
06-18-2010, 10:24 AM
AHHHHH......The big turning points in a bikers life......Belt drive,electronic ignition,hydraulic lifters and my personal fav.....the 6 speed :)
(boiling the chain sucked the most)

Farbmeister
06-19-2010, 12:44 PM
Umm.. the lube is not for the sprocket, but the chains internal pins and bushings.

I would think that capillary action is not the best delivery of said needed lubricants.

I don't see what your speed has anything to do with it... and no, not impressed with 156mph.

dneufell don't forget EFI and floor boards, and heel shifters. How did I live without them???

Willy
06-19-2010, 01:45 PM
Umm.. the lube is not for the sprocket, but the chains internal pins and bushings.

I would think that capillary action is not the best delivery of said needed lubricants.
.........

Capillary action is the only way for a lubricant to enter the pin/bushing area of a roller chain, short of disassembling each link, lubing and reassembly.:eek:
Whether the lubricant is sprayed on or the chain is immersed in can of lubricant and allowed to soak in it. Ultimately it is the capillary phenomena that allows the lubricant to enter the pin/bushing interface.
Hence the popularity of O-ring chain, the lube is applied at the factory and then it is sealed in and contaminants are sealed out.

darryl
06-19-2010, 04:59 PM
Hmm- I'd like to see the situation where the lube applied to a chain DOESNT make it into the pins and links (o-ring chains excepted). If someone knows how you can put lube in one small spot and have the area right next to that remain dry- well, maybe let NASA know-

topct
06-19-2010, 06:29 PM
And we know that a properly adjusted chain is as important as a properly lubricated one.

A new chain needs to be watched closely for adjustment. No matter the type or the lube. That first setup can change quickly as the chain breaks in.

I would check a new chain before and after each ride for at least a hundred miles. And I like to keep those first rides short.

Chain adjustment and tire pressures are right up there with the most neglected parts of a motorcycle.

kf2qd
06-19-2010, 08:17 PM
They still require maintenance, however.............and it can be time-consuming, removing the "pumpkin" to get at the drive shaft to lube it.

.
Dive shaft on my bike has a grease fitting.Need to put some of them on htat chain...

hardtail
06-19-2010, 11:30 PM
That is a wonderful ride Daryl..........I have a 56 bobber and am missing a couple last pieces to go back to original but it has had a lot of incorrect items over the past 5 and a half decades..........I don't really care for the 56 V tank emblems either.....yours are much nicer.......

Looks like a lot of pride and craftsmanship has gone into that one........good luck on your lube.......

dneufell
06-20-2010, 12:56 AM
Farbmiester.....YES.....When i was a kid i thought i was hard core....laughed
at the old dudes (they were really really old....like 50 :) ) Now I am around
50 .....Windshield and all!

gnm109
06-20-2010, 04:32 AM
Dive shaft on my bike has a grease fitting.Need to put some of them on htat chain...


Almost any shaft-driven motorcycle should have the shaft removed periodically in order to apply lubricant to the drive splines. It's a regular feature of Honda maintenance. They use a high-moly content paste.

While a grease fitting is good, it won't do the whole job.