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gregl
06-15-2010, 11:27 PM
So now that you are retiredÖ

do you have more time for the shop, about the same, or less?

I was chatting on line with a youngster (perhaps 25 or so) recently and he said heíd like to retire so he could spend 50 hours a week in the shop. I told him that it doesnít work that way.

Hereís how it goes:

First, one of my rules is that I do NOT get up at 5:30 any more. Even if I wake up early by mistake, I stay in bed until 6:30 minimum, usually 7, just as a matter of principle. Then there is breakfast and the paper, and a check on-line for more news and email. Then comes my morning workout and walk, followed by a shower and shave (Honey says I have to shave or I donít getÖ well, I have to shave), which takes the morning to about 9 or 9:30.

Then I have about two hours or so in the shop until lunch, which includes more on-line lurking, followed by the all-important Siesta. Being a former Olympic napper (Silver Medal, Freestyle Snooze), I need to keep in shape so said Siesta could be 45 minutes or an hour, the whole lunch break ending up at about two hours total. After that, Iím a bit wiped out from the exertion so itís back to the kitchen to replace some carbs and electrolytes. Then itís perhaps three hours in the shop Ďtill dinner.

I rarely work in the shop after dinner. Itís either too dark or too cold or too hot or there are too many bugs, and besides, the wife usually needs some recognition, or there is some on-line stuff that needs attention (such as this forum), or I need another shower (itís really hot here in the summer). Then itís time to wind down for beddy-bye. If I donít slow down gradually, I wonít sleep through the night which means the next day could require two Siestas. Not a bad thing, but Honey taunts me about it so I try to avoid it (at least when sheís home).

All of the above doesnít include interruptions for Honey-dos, grandchildren (They all live in our town, When the kids come over, they like to hammer nails into wood in the shop, so all other shop work stops, or I need to read them a story or fix broken toys.), or tending to old ladies (Mom is 96 and M.I.L. is 91). And my sweetheart has decided that, after going to the market for 41 years and trying to decide what to feed me, that I need to go along and pick out what I want to eat. (Fair enough except she doesnít like what I pick and wonít cook it, so it ends up on the shelf. She wonít let me cook because sheís afraid Iíll break the kitchen.) So itís a couple of hours out for the market. Then thereís the visits to the dentist, optometrist, urologist. the wifeís orthopedic surgeon (Joint replacements. All of them.), all of which take at least three hours each.

And from time to time I have to stop in to see my buddy who still works in the salt mine to see how much worse itís gotten and find out how many days he has left.

And since all the family lives in town, time outs must be taken for 12 birthdays, Easter, Fourth of July, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and miscellaneous other get-togethers. And at least four times a year we flee the homestead for the open road, said adventures lasting for anywhere from a weekend to a month or so.

Then there are the delays to shop projects caused by trips to the hardware store (12 miles round-trip) or all the way to the other side of town to the metal yard (Forty miles; half-day minimum. Allowance also has to be made for a stop at Horrible Fright Tools, which is on the way, just to see if anything has changed since the last visit.), or worse, waiting for mail-ordered tools and parts to arrive.

So if I get three or four five-hour days a week, I consider it a good week.

How many hours a week do you really get to spend in your shop?

lakeside53
06-15-2010, 11:32 PM
"So if I get three or four five-hour days a week, I consider it a good week.Sounds about right..."


Sounds about right! Sometime I can squeeze in an 8 hour day... if you count the other local under-employed that pop in to visit for an hour or two.

bborr01
06-15-2010, 11:38 PM
Hi Greg,

I hear you. I have been retired for about 4 years now. I remember having retirees tell me that they don't know how they ever found time to go to work.

It seems like I still do a lot of what I did before I retired, just more of it.

Nice.

edit: I wish I could say that I average 25 hours a week in the shop. Maybe on a good week.
Brian

lugnut
06-15-2010, 11:44 PM
The most important thing I found out when I retired is: I don't have to rush to get things done around the house before the weekend is over. I have all damn week to do it now and at MY pace... You will learn to slow down and take your time.
Enjoy:)

gnm109
06-16-2010, 12:20 AM
Since I'm no longer working, I never spend more than three hours in the shop at any one time. It's usually in the morning from 8:00 a.m. If I have something to do, it really makes little difference when I finish. It's the process that I enjoy.

I have projects going all of the time. The latest one is reviving a Honda riding mower that was bought new by the former owner, ridden one season and then left out in the rain.....for five years. I got it free but it's taken me a month to remove the rust and refinish everythng and now I get to put it all back together. No rush on anything anymore.

:)

saltmine
06-16-2010, 12:53 AM
'bout right. I try not to get up any earlier than 6:00 AM, mainly because one of the channels on my Satellite TV has "The Three Stooges" on some mornings at 6:00AM. Yeah, after all these years, I'm still a Stooge fan. Having worked in a shop run by the real life "Three Stooges" before I retired didn't help. Breakfast, sh*t, shave, and shower, not necessarily in that order, and I'm ready to face the day. Here, in Arizona if you want to get something done, it has to be done before noon, because it gets so darned hot. (No A/C in the shop). Around noon, I come inside, turn on the cooler, and have lunch.
Catch up with what's going on at several forums around the internet. Maybe do a little reading, or scratch out some CAD renderings, take a nap, then it's dinner time...Maybe watch a little TV (TV is getting pretty bad, lately. too many lame "soap operas", "kill-everything-in-sight" shows and stupid reality shows seem to be the most prevalent....it's no wonder I watch mostly documentaries and cartoons)

Fortunately, just recently, I bought myself a stool so I can sit down while I'm working in the shop. Ten years ago I would have never thought of that.


One thing I learned: I don't have to RUSH anything anymore....thank God!

Pherdie
06-16-2010, 12:55 AM
Ditto on I'm in no hurry, that is one of the things I enjoy best. After spending most of my life at a fever pitched pace, I was ready to slow down.
I probably get far less done in a given week than I used to, but I really don't care. Coming from a goal orientated person, that's quite a reformation.

Sometimes other responsibilities keep me out of the shop, but I usually get in at least an hour or two a day and on good days, all day. The shop is my happy place, my Fortress of Solitude. No commute necessary, food, drinks and toilets just steps away. My music, my thoughts, my long awaited projects..... :o

Fred

DFMiller
06-16-2010, 01:21 AM
I think I had more time to do shop work when I was working, I am on semi- retirement for a few more months and I am getting very little shop time. I am almost looking forward to going back to work. I guess I should not complain too much as I get to go to the CNC workshop. Started driving there today. I should make it in time as long as I dont knock any cyclists off their bikes with my mirrors. ;-)

gr8life
06-16-2010, 01:38 AM
Been retired for 8 years +- Here is my schedule
Up 06:15 +- 15 minutes
On line trade some days
Mon. Wed. Fri. Walk to gym- work out - walk home 1hr 45 min +-
Snack
Shop till 10:30
Lunch
Back in shop by 11:00 +-
Work till 1:00 snack
Shop till 4:00
Tue. Thu. Sat. Sun. same as above but no gym (Sat & Sun no market)
I do enough work to pay for my hobby + make a little profit.
I love it. I tried not working so much but found I am happiest when I am doing something. It is a GR8Life
to each his own
thanks
ed

KIMFAB
06-16-2010, 01:48 AM
Kinda the same here but I'm usually up by 6 and sometimes by 4 AM because it hurts to stay in bed. Go out and shuffle around for an hour or so and then come in and take a nap.

I just got a Dean Smith lathe that I'm redoing so that is taking up a lot of time. I can't post pictures for some reason, otherwise I would give a blow by blow.

You are right about the doctor visits, they take a lot of time. We live about an hour from Vegas so it is usually the whole day shot.
The wife is on chemo so we can easily kill at least 2 and sometimes 4 days a week just going to the doc.

Finally got some renters for my place in the back so we'll have some mad money again. More toys.

Just noticed Ed on here, Hi! Didn't realize you did the market thing too. I only do it cause I have to so I didn't mention it

dp
06-16-2010, 02:05 AM
When I was retired I spent a lot of time in the shop. After the economy, my investments, and housing market collapse I had to go back to work and now have very little time for the shop.

winchman
06-16-2010, 02:36 AM
I do almost all my shop stuff at the local tech school welding and machining shop. The instructor mostly lets me do whatever I want, but I end up doing lots of stuff for the school, for local charities and youth groups, and other people who bring us interesting stuff to fix or build.

I've got access to tens of thousands of dollars worth of good equipment, most of the materials I need, and all the consumables. The shop is only available from 8 to 8 four days a week, but what can you expect for a whopping $82 per quarter. To top it off, it's only a five-minute drive or fifteen-minute walk from the house.

I still use my home shop a bit, but after two moves it's much smaller and no longer heated and air-conditioned. It's hard to justify making an investment in a better home shop under the current circumstances.

JRouche
06-16-2010, 03:51 AM
Ok, I like this thread. Im retired. Im gonna turn 45 in august so I dont need any nap time. Been retired for three years now and LOVE it.

More time? No. The extra time gets eaten up. I still have kids. The youngest is 6yo.

But honestly, the kids were in school, summer break now. But during the school year my time went like this.....

Wake at 7, jump outta bed, take a leak then do 45 push-ups. Brush the teeth, hop in the shower then do a set of ab exercises. They KILL!. Dress and get down stairs where my great wife has already got the kids up and into breakfast. And she has already had the pot of coffee going. Pour my BIG cup, its like half the pot and then feed the fish in the backyard pond. Come back in and help motivate the kids to get ready for school and then drive them off. Three days a week, she does the other two days.

Get back home and my bowl of coffee might need to be heated up. 60 seconds in the micro then Im up stairs to the computer. Checking on emails from my four + email addies then check on my ebay activity, yup, buying and selling.. Then the news, CNN, hate the slant they seem to have but the coverage is decent. Check the stock markets for a sec then off back downstairs to the garage. Its prolly ten by then.

Clear off the debris from the night before (yes, thats this nights debris, I drink and smoke). Then look at the project of the day. Lately its been my project car. As the weather gets nicer I get out in the yard and mess with it more. I really like working in the yard in summer.

12 O-clock comes around and I sit down. Ill eat something now, I dont eat breakfast, I drink coffee. Eat something and watch some TV. OH I LOVE TV. Ill do more exercises at one. Usually some weights till two. Then I put on some shorts and walking shoes and walk for a lil over an hour. 4.25 miles. Monday through friday.

After my walk I turn on the 4 O-clock news and start dinner. Yup, I love to cook and eat. So I make dinner for the fam and we eat around 5:30.

Clean up and get the kids cleaned up and book time for them at 8. Book time for them every night. Kinda funny, my lil girl LOVES to read. She is six. Used to be where I read to her. Now she wants to do all the reading. Good thing. At 6yo she does better than me.

Kids are in bed by 9 and I chill with my wife after that. TV, reading or whatever :) Sometimes I get back online here when its late and she is gonzo asleep. Shes gotta work still, prolly another 20 years.

Thats my life, retired.... I kinda like it ALOT!!! JR

polepenhollow
06-16-2010, 04:21 AM
'bout right. I try not to get up any earlier than 6:00 AM, mainly because one of the channels on my Satellite TV has "The Three Stooges" on some mornings at 6:00AM. Yeah, after all these years, I'm still a Stooge fan. Having worked in a shop run by the real life "Three Stooges" before I retired didn't help. Breakfast, sh*t, shave, and shower, not necessarily in that order, and I'm ready to face the day. Here, in Arizona if you want to get something done, it has to be done before noon, because it gets so darned hot. (No A/C in the shop). Around noon, I come inside, turn on the cooler, and have lunch.
Catch up with what's going on at several forums around the internet. Maybe do a little reading, or scratch out some CAD renderings, take a nap, then it's dinner time...Maybe watch a little TV (TV is getting pretty bad, lately. too many lame "soap operas", "kill-everything-in-sight" shows and stupid reality shows seem to be the most prevalent....it's no wonder I watch mostly documentaries and cartoons)

Fortunately, just recently, I bought myself a stool so I can sit down while I'm working in the shop. Ten years ago I would have never thought of that.


One thing I learned: I don't have to RUSH anything anymore....thank God!


That's usually called the 3 (three) S's. $hit, $hower n' $have
Happy retirement.
I am rebuilding a house in Marysville Wa. I am supposedly retired too.
I spend at least 1 Hour a day Watching Dora or Dieago on Disney, Google or YouTube w/ my beautiful grandaughter on my lap.
K Liv

Carld
06-16-2010, 10:47 AM
How much time you spend in your shop when you retire depends on what you get involved in and how you schedule your day.

I am careful about getting involved with things that take me away from the shop but sometimes I wonder how I ever got all the things done I did after working all day. I guess I just do it more leisurely now that I am retired and for that reason things take longer to do.

There is very little mad dashing around in my life now that I am retired.

daryl bane
06-16-2010, 11:35 AM
You guys are making me ill....or jealous. Who retires at 45?.Jeeeze.

garagemark
06-16-2010, 12:14 PM
Not who, but HOW do you retire at 45? I have well enough money to maintain a comfortable lifestyle, but INSURANCE is the killer of my "R" plan. There is just no good (read affordable) way to self insure that I can find, and my company insurance would only last a year if I pulled the pin now.

Big Sigh..... I had better get back to work.

lakeside53
06-16-2010, 12:53 PM
How to get out early? Often by pure luck - big $$ working spouse, stock market, Dot com boom/bust, lottery, inheritance etc... but.. working a lifetime of average wage generally doesn't do it. You just have to make the best of what's available.

JRouche
06-16-2010, 01:43 PM
Not who, but HOW do you retire at 45? I have well enough money to maintain a comfortable lifestyle, but INSURANCE is the killer of my "R" plan. There is just no good (read affordable) way to self insure that I can find, and my company insurance would only last a year if I pulled the pin now.

Big Sigh..... I had better get back to work.

I was a cop for many years. After 20 years they pick up the full tab for med insurance for the whole family. But.... Whats kinda funny is I dont even use that option. My wife is still working. Shes got 20 more years to go. Poor girl :p We use her employer's (Wellpoint) insurance.

She makes a good income (Nurse case manager) but my pension and other income from investments still pays most of the bills. With just enough left over to supply the home shop. Shhhh!!!! I think I hear her now :)

Anyway.. Im loving life right now. But.... Just when yer comfortable life WILL throw a curve ball atcha. So.. Im always making sure to live well within our range of income. Ya never know what can happen right...

Hmmmm, what shall I do today :D JR

bob_s
06-16-2010, 04:28 PM
JR:

You aren't retired, you've just changed careers. Now you are the house-hubby.
You ain't retired, until the youngest finally, and forever moves out - good luck!

John Stevenson
06-16-2010, 04:41 PM
Retired ?
Can't wait but I don't think I will be able to without either selling the shop up or moving.

Problem is people know I'm here and even if I retired they wouldn't stop coming. two customers are very worried I only have two years left and both have told me they are more than willing to pay pound notes for jobs.

Took two pics of the entrance to the shop this morning from two angles

http://www.stevenson-engineers.co.uk/files/shop3.jpg

http://www.stevenson-engineers.co.uk/files/shop4.jpg

All that lot is wanted by Monday lunch.

Retirement ? What's that.

.

dockrat
06-16-2010, 08:16 PM
JR:

You aren't retired, you've just changed careers. Now you are the house-hubby.
You ain't retired, until the youngest finally, and forever moves out - good luck!

They might move out of the house but they still live in your wallet LOL:D

Henro
06-16-2010, 08:21 PM
When I was 53 my plant shut down and I decided to try "retirement" for a while, which ended up being for 5 years. It took a while to get used to (maybe 6 months) but retirement life is good I found out.

I also found out there were things that came up that caused me to plant $10K here and there (weddings for the two girls, a sewer line came through...and a couple other things...)... so after five years I went back to work...at age 59.8 or so.

Doing what? What those guys that used to work for me did! I got a union job in the same industry where I worked as an engineer. Who needs all the BS that goes with the salary position when you are only going to work thee years anyway? That was just short of 5 years ago. The surprising thing is that making new friends in a different environment is kind of cool. I like the work (doing it this time), like the people I work with, and like the fact that I am paid for every minute and really have much more control of my life than I did in the previous one. If I want a day of I just take it off. Granted I don't get paid for that day but I don' t have to kiss a$$ for it either. Life is good.

While retired I used to wonder how I got anything done while I worked. Everyday is Sunday when you are retired. Really is. Take a vacation...come back when you want, any time... you set the pace and the time line.

Funniest thing is that while I look forward to retiring again, I don't feel the need to rush it. I like doing what I am doing. I like the people. I like the job. And I don't feel bad at all about driving into work in the morning.

I guess what I am trying to say is that work is not all that bad either...Retirement is better really, if you have the cash you need.

For me, the greatest novelty was going back to work and actually having someone PAY ME FOR DOING SOMETHING. When retired not only did I work for free, but I had to buy the materials too! For my own use of course. But getting paid to work on things after paying to do work for my self over those 5 years really ticked me to death. Still does a little now...

Next time I throw in the towel will be for real. I will have to pay my own health insurance again...for me and the wife...and buy all the materials I need to do work around the place...

At 63.5 now I realize this is the last real job I will likely have. I can work it as long as I like (unions do offer some positive things to the little guy...)

Retirement is good. Working is good too. If you really like what you do then don't think that retirement will be better. It might be, but it might not be.

In my case it was better, but not by that much. If the difference were that great I would quit today (I could I think). But I don't feel the need to. And I have five years of retirement under my belt so I DO KNOW what it is about...

Just thought I would mention this for those who may be on the fence...

DFMiller
06-17-2010, 01:02 AM
John, you have been holding out on us. I thought you had a dirt floor in you shop?You have room for at least two more b'ports. ;-)
Dave

JRouche
06-17-2010, 02:02 AM
JR:

You aren't retired, you've just changed careers. Now you are the house-hubby.
You ain't retired, until the youngest finally, and forever moves out - good luck!

Oh yeah, I LOVE my kids. But they are at school most of the day anyway. But Im still here anytime they need me. I just wish they were more into the mechanics of the shop. My son isnt. But lemme say. My girl is loving the shop. Loves all the machines and "STUFF" in there. Shes a lil young at 6 to be getting her too involved. But she loves to play with dads toys.

Some day Ill have to come up with a project that she will enjoy after its done. Something that she can kinda help out with and it will be hers to keep. It would be nice to think she will be interested in mechanics, but she really is a girlie girl but has a side of her that is interested in dads toys. I think she just wants to spend time with me. That will prolly evaporate after not too long.

But yeah, I love my kids and thats a side benny for being retired. I can give them ALL of me, whatever they want. Thats a good thing..... JR

JRouche
06-17-2010, 02:15 AM
They might move out of the house but they still live in your wallet LOL:D

Hahaha.. Other than school they are on their own after they move out. We have a school account set up for each of them. And we started when they were young. Well, they are young. But younger, when they were born. And its a drain on the income.

I was against it, I never went to college. But my wife was in college for 9 years and is all for college. I was thinking the military is good enough. So anyway, she won that battle. But there is a compromise. If the kids dont go to college then that money will be our vacation travel fund. The kids dont get it unless they go to school. No sitting around on their azz living off the money while trying to figure out what they want to do in life. Life just hit you at 18. Live it or die trying. Im hoping they live it and go to school. JR

gmatov
06-18-2010, 03:36 AM
JR,

Enjoy that little girl. My only granddaughter has graduated, is moving a couple hundred miles to live with her Dad to go to school. She's been my Soccer Buddy for more than 12 years. Took her to ALL her practices, left work early every Saturday to take her to games, and watched her play in every game in High School.

No more of that, and I am at a loss. I have 2 grandsons coming up, 7 and 5, and have possibly 12 years of encouraging them, but past 65, I don't know if I will be there.

If you want something for the baby girl to do in the shop, try a jig saw. Reciprocating bench top. The beauty of them is that they are less prone to cutting fingers off. Band saw will cut your hand off, pushing too hard. Jig saws reciprocate, you get bit, the blade rises and you can pull your thumb back without losing it.

I've been a shooter all my life. Bought the boys Remington Bird Hunter for the Wii yesterday. They and Mom and Dad love it. The boys want me to teach them to shoot, Mom wants me to teach them to shoot, even take them to trap shoots, which I did for a good few years.

I think I have found where to will all my guns. My Grands. My kid is less PC, I guess, than most mothers. I took them to a store some time back and tried to buy them cap pistols, the 7 YO said "Mom would never let us have GUNS." I told Mom that and she said "I LOVED capguns when I was a kid."

Trouble is that they are all crap, today. They don't shoot, they don't feed.

I don't KNOW if I can buy an air rifle that is child sized. I know I can buy a .22 that is. I think Mom is OK with that. Dad, I don't know. He was pretty well sheltered in his upbringing.

I'll see. Personally, I am no longer into cased cartridge shooting, today. I'm more into BP revolvers. I think I could let the boys shoot a .36 with minimal loads.

Cheers,

George

Ps, Ain't a one of them gonna hold up my 4 pound 9 ounce Walker. Dislocated shoulder a year ago, and not treated, Doc said Xray says No, I have trouble holding it up.

BWS
06-18-2010, 06:33 AM
George,about ripped my left arm off my body 1 1/2 years ago in a MC wreck(head to toe race leathers saved big time).No docs,but in talking with several athletes who'd been through same....and a little research found that any surgery was mainly for cosmetic reasons.Maybe if I was 18 but no way in mid 50's...it's too intrusive of a surgery.

Bought a Smith machine and worked through it........shoulder's good enough that I can still shoot traditional archery equip(50# recurves).Best of luck,BW.

PS,I tried retirement....lasted about 5 minutes.Nothing really changed?Still in the shop everyday.

gmatov
06-20-2010, 03:34 AM
BWS,
In my prime, a 45# recurve was about all I could draw. THAT one, if you can believe, that GD and a Gson managed to break one of the limbs off in my basement, playing, not with IT, I don't think, but just playing. They were maybe 6 and 3.

This shoulder has been screwed up for about 16 months. I thought it was bursitis. Had that once before. Later decided to go to the Doc. I don't go there often. He says "Gotta get an Xray before you are allowed to get an MRI. Tech who shot it said, "Yep, that's a dislocation." Doc says "No, the guy who reads them says it's not dislocated." I asked why in the hell does it still hurt after near a year and he says he doesn't know.

Exercise is not, I think, what I need, for this shoulder. Unless you think that "no pain, no gain" is still the goal of exercise. I can get lots of pain with little effort just lifting to horizontal. I should be gaining lots.

Love being retired. Hope some more of you can get here before you die. I, for one, never thought I wanted to die in harness.

Never saw a headstone that was inscribed "I wish I had spent more time at work."

Cheers,

George

gnm109
06-20-2010, 05:46 AM
It's wise to retire while you can still move without too much pain. I had a terrible orthopedic problem with my left hip and it took a long time to fix. While I was recuperating, I looked around and checked my finances and determined that I was not going to work anymore.

Now that I'm not workng, I notice that I still have all of my possessions and the sun comes up in the morning as before. I have the good, quiet time in the early mornings to do the things I like to do, only one of which is HSM. While I'm not rich by any means, I have finances enough to get by and just enough of everything I need.

Part of being able to retire is the ability to look at one's situation and determine what is really important and what is really necessary. You may already have all of the elements necessary to be able to retire. Try it, you'll like it. :)

.

danlb
06-20-2010, 08:31 PM
Exercise is not, I think, what I need, for this shoulder. Unless you think that "no pain, no gain" is still the goal of exercise. I can get lots of pain with little effort just lifting to horizontal. I should be gaining lots.


IIRC, The concept behind the exercise is to strengthen the muscles that hold the shoulder together while also stretching tendons that may be restricting movement.

Surgery CAN be of benefit in many cases, as can various injections.


Back on topic...

When I was an independent consultant during the dot-com boom I would routinely have many months between jobs. During that 7 years I was able to enjoy being semi-retired. I delved into many area that had piqued my interest, including machining, locksmithing, exotic flashlight collecting and building. Now that I'm back to work the only new skills I've picked up lately is MIG and OA welding.

I really look forward to being able to retire again.

Dan

1937 Chief
06-20-2010, 08:54 PM
I guess I can I am offically retired from the Unisys computor co. after 36 years. I do have a business cutting fire brakes here in S. Calif., but the good thing, it is only around four months, and as of now it is 2/3 over. I can start, or stop any time I want, or take a day off. without anyone asking any questions. Life it great. Stan

gmatov
06-21-2010, 01:57 AM
Money's funny. You make XX dollars and you simply don't have enough.

Now, this will hit a raw nerve here, or maybe over there, but in my latter, with more seniority, years, and I WAS Union shop, I took VLO, Voluntary Lay Off, rather than let a younger man be laid off. They might not be called back. I would.

My UC was approx. the same as my while working takehome, if you ignore the money that was going to the CU and the money that would have gone to the 401, which I would have seen even greater losses over the last couple years than I did see.

I was probably ahead of the game. I drove 20 miles to work, say 3 gallons at 3 bucks per day, so 9 X 5 is 45, per week. That I did not contribute to either the CU or the 401 didn't and doesn't bother me one bit. Over 5 years and I haven't touched the 401, so I think I can do without it. Will probably be part of my estate.

My income is enough for me to live on, and to help my kids, and still build up more than I need. I don't want to die with the biggest bequest to my kids. I would rather help them while I am alive and they need help.

Cheers,

George

I'll tell you about a couple guys who said they couldn't afford to retire in a future post.

oldtiffie
06-21-2010, 08:03 AM
This came in the email today - I've seen variants of it over a while.

Without prejudice - or comment:


A Concept to consider - 15/06/10

Let's put the seniors in jail, and the criminals in a nursing home.

This way the seniors would have access to showers, hobbies, and walks. They'd receive unlimited free prescriptions, dental and medical treatment, wheelchairs , hearing aids, etc., and receive some money instead of paying it out. They would be protected from the criminal element and scam artists who prey upon the seniors.

They would have constant video monitoring, so they could be helped instantly if they fell or needed assistance. Bedding would be washed twice a week, and all clothing would be ironed and returned to them.

A guard would check on them every 20 minutes, and bring their meals and snacks to their cell. They would have family visits in a suite built for that purpose. They would have access to a library, weight room, counseling, pool, and free education.

Simple clothing, shoes, slippers, P.J.'s and legal aid would be free, on request. Private, secure rooms for all, with an exercise outdoor yard, with gardens.

Each senior could have a P.C., a T.V., radio, and daily phone calls.

There would be a board of directors to hear complaints, and the guards would have a code of conduct, that would be strictly adhered to.

The "criminals" would get cold food, be left all alone, and unsupervised.Lights off at 8pm, and showers once a week.They would live in a tiny room, and pay $5000.00 per month and have no hope of ever getting out.

Justice for all.

Hamilton
06-21-2010, 11:07 AM
Retire before 45. I am in the construction trades. Economy effected to say the least. I am layed off. I catch a day of work here and there Keep up with ever changing unemployment rules, worry about health insurance cost and eligibility. Work a little in my shop. I only spend money in the shop that is generated from the shop. Buy sell trade this and that. Attack the never ending honey do list. Looks like i have the same criteria for retirement. The only catch is when the job market picks up and i go back to work steady...I will have to work until the day i die. :D

gaston
06-21-2010, 11:26 AM
Quit "work " at 50 for mental health reasons (customers were driving me nuts) wife worked for 5 more years. its been 16 years and I haven't missed working at all. Its surprising how much money it costs to go to work. we hardly missed my pay.
"retirement is doing what you want when you want to do it"
if you want to work and you enjoy it then you are retired

saltmine
06-21-2010, 12:33 PM
Funny, now that you mentioned that, Gaston. When I retired, I decided I'd keep on working. And, after a number of low paying jobs, I discovered it was costing me almost as much as I was making, to be working.

Last year, I decided to quit trying, and when tax time rolled around, I didn't owe the government hardly anything. (the year before, I owed the IRS over $1000).

Strange, I'm not working at all now, and I seem to get by just fine.

saltmine
06-21-2010, 12:38 PM
Putting seniors in prison sounds like a pretty good idea. And criminals in nursing homes would be "cruel & unusual punishment" (they deserve it, though)

The other way would be to take citizenship from all seniors. That way, they would be illegal aliens, and could get free food, clothing, housing, education, and medical care, and not have to pay a dime for it.

gmatov
06-22-2010, 02:35 AM
Some of you are getting the idea.

30 years ago I told my partner on my electric buggy, machine repair, age 63, that he was working for nothing. We argued about that for a while. I crashed a car, broke some ribs, was off 7 weeks, went back to work, thought we would be a team again.

No, he went to HR while I was off, they told him he would make more, after taxes and all other deductions, retired than he did while working. He was gone. Poor guy used to love fishing at Pymatuning Lake, near Lake Erie, and rolled his boat over and drowned about7 years later. 3 days before they found his body.

He was a good partner, and knew his stuff.

'Nother in the steel mill electronics dept., 64, 44 years service, NO OT in that dept., said he couldn't afford to retire. I gave him my estimate, he went to HR, they told him he was losing money working, HE was gone the next week.

I don't like WalMart, but a lot of people COULD retire and be ahead of the game with their pension and SS and 8 bucks an hour as a WalMart greeter. They might be TEN bucks an hour ahead, part time. Don't ask me to back that up.

danlb,

I am kinda lazy. I don't do lots of tough stuff, unless my kids make demands of me. I didn't do any hard work before my shoulder went out. I THINK, I simply slept on it wrong, popped it out, and SHOULD have gone to the Doc next day. Didn't. Three months later, did, BFD, they don't see anything wrong.

I don't think it is weakening of the muscles. I've worked for near 50 years. Right arm to boot, and that is my strong arm. But I get a click and I get a lock up when I move it in certain ways. Bad joint, I think.

Cheers,

George

BWS
06-22-2010, 02:45 PM
George,check your PM's.

Oh,and I shot a '72 Bear TD with "our" custom CF limbs,60# @ 29 for 10 years professionally.BW