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Elninio
06-17-2010, 06:40 PM
The nameplate on the machine has been painted over and damaged on a small shaper (7" aprox), causing the logo on the plate to have faded. What can be seen is a picture of a square tooth gear viewed on the face (2D, not 3D). What is the name of the maker? The machine is north-american and doesn't seem to have a native motor mount (so it was probably driven by water).

Edit: my photos start on page 4: http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=41996&page=4

rockrat
06-17-2010, 11:51 PM
A photo would help a million.

rock~

Elninio
06-18-2010, 02:54 AM
A photo would help a million.

rock~
Honestly, it wouldn't --- I'd be surprised if the camera could even pick it up in a way that the human eye can tell the colors apart. Its just the outline of a gear with square tooth, like in the logo for Lico Machinery (http://www.lipoco.com/images/LICOTM.GIF). Aside from that, all I remember from the previous owner is that the company was a very popular one, possibly made in Ontario (Canada).

b2u44
06-18-2010, 03:07 AM
Honestly, it wouldn't --- I'd be surprised if the camera could even pick it up in a way that the human eye can tell the colors apart.
I think rockrat wanted a picture of the whole shaper and not just the nameplate. The folks around here can usually ID machines from an overall view of the machine.

Elninio
06-18-2010, 01:24 PM
I think rockrat wanted a picture of the whole shaper and not just the nameplate. The folks around here can usually ID machines from an overall view of the machine.

Photos will have to wait; I just moved into this new house and the first thing I did was go out and buy an old shaper and begin restoring it (as opposed to unpacking boxes, painting the walls, refinishing the floors, installing new counters, ...). I know its not an Atlas, Myford or Lewis model though (knowing this from looking at various videos of small shapers on youtube).

RB211
06-18-2010, 02:16 PM
Photos will have to wait; I just moved into this new house and the first thing I did was go out and buy an old shaper and begin restoring it (as opposed to unpacking boxes, painting the walls, refinishing the floors, installing new counters, ...). I know its not an Atlas, Myford or Lewis model though (knowing this from looking at various videos of small shapers on youtube).
So in other words, you don't really want help figuring out which shaper you have? :confused:

Elninio
06-18-2010, 02:21 PM
Until I have photos, I will try to describe some features of the shaper:
- I'm not sure if its a 7" or 8" model
- it has box ways, except on the Z axis of the knife holder
- the table Z axis coupling (between the feed screw[horizontal], and the screw that holds the table in place[vertical, it is fixed to the base and doesn't rotate, but rather the gear rotates around it]) is by helical gears,
-there is a speed lever at the back that shifts a clutch inside the machine to one of three positions; the middle position disengages the clutch,
-there is no chain drive on this machine; all mechanisms inside are gears
-the machine was originally painted black (possibly the primer), then beige, then green, then machine tool gray; the black and beige layers seemed to behave like bondo when grinding it off with a wire brush, and the beige layer being approximately 1mm in thickness
-the stand is all rounded and non-polygonal like that of ammco shapers; the top view of the plate that the shaper sits on looks like a semi-circle attached to a rectangle,

Waterlogged
06-18-2010, 02:57 PM
How hard is it to take a picture and post it? Takes two minutes, one if you have a cell phone that takes pictures. Or go to lathes.co.uk and look there for examples.

Elninio
06-18-2010, 04:01 PM
How hard is it to take a picture and post it? Takes two minutes, one if you have a cell phone that takes pictures. Or go to lathes.co.uk and look there for examples.
It would take a whole day actually since everything is in boxes, it would take me a couple of hours if I just opened all the boxes and left them open with items spilling all over the place. I can't upload photos from my phone for various other reasons.

Alistair Hosie
06-18-2010, 05:14 PM
Elninio what does hahahahahahaha mean?

rockrat
06-18-2010, 06:48 PM
-there is a speed lever at the back that shifts a clutch inside the machine to one of three positions; the middle position disengages the clutch,


Except for this part of the quote, it sounds like every other shaper I have ever seen.

Does it look like a Jones? http://www.lathes.co.uk/jones/page2.html

rock~

MotorradMike
06-18-2010, 07:32 PM
HAHAHAHAHAHA means something is REALLY funny.

hahahahahahaha means something is really funny but not nearly as funny as HAHAHAHAHAHA.

I think.

Bob Farr
06-18-2010, 08:52 PM
Until I have photos, I will try to describe some features of the shaper:
- I'm not sure if its a 7" or 8" model
- it has box ways, except on the Z axis of the knife holder
- the table Z axis coupling (between the feed screw[horizontal], and the screw that holds the table in place[vertical, it is fixed to the base and doesn't rotate, but rather the gear rotates around it]) is by helical gears,
-there is a speed lever at the back that shifts a clutch inside the machine to one of three positions; the middle position disengages the clutch,
-there is no chain drive on this machine; all mechanisms inside are gears
-the machine was originally painted black (possibly the primer), then beige, then green, then machine tool gray; the black and beige layers seemed to behave like bondo when grinding it off with a wire brush, and the beige layer being approximately 1mm in thickness
-the stand is all rounded and non-polygonal like that of ammco shapers; the top view of the plate that the shaper sits on looks like a semi-circle attached to a rectangle,

Some similar elements, some not on this Swiss Torpex (which I think is a copy of a early Elliott or Alba design). But that's a bit like saying cars from different manufacturers have similar elements, like four wheels and an engine. A photo would be really helpful.

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/Torpex3-1.jpg

Bluehill
06-18-2010, 11:59 PM
Photos will have to wait; I just moved into this new house and the first thing I did was go out and buy an old shaper and begin restoring it (as opposed to unpacking boxes, painting the walls, refinishing the floors, installing new counters, ...). I know its not an Atlas, Myford or Lewis model though (knowing this from looking at various videos of small shapers on youtube).



Ok. I'd like to play this game. I'm trying to figure out what collets my mill takes. I've already got one but I'd like to buy more. What I can tell you is that its big on one end and gets smaller on the other. Oh, and its got a bar that you screw into the top. Anyone have any clue what taper it is?

Rodger

Elninio
06-19-2010, 01:00 AM
Except for this part of the quote, it sounds like every other shaper I have ever seen.

Does it look like a Jones? http://www.lathes.co.uk/jones/page2.html

rock~

Its definitely not a Jones; the table construction is a box mounted on two box ways which are connected by two helical gears to the Z screw.

Elninio
06-19-2010, 01:02 AM
Some similar elements, some not on this Swiss Torpex (which I think is a copy of a early Elliott or Alba design). But that's a bit like saying cars from different manufacturers have similar elements, like four wheels and an engine. A photo would be really helpful.

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/Torpex3-1.jpg

This one pictured here is almost identical, Bob! Mine doesn't have the motor mounted at the back like that, and is a bit beefier on the arm ... also the stand is completely different ...

Elninio
06-19-2010, 01:07 AM
Try matching the list I gave you to all the pictures you can find on the internet of small shapers, I bet you won't find a match for it, Rodger

Circlip
06-19-2010, 05:15 AM
Originally Posted by Elninio
Photos will have to wait; I just moved into this new house and the first thing I did was go out and buy an old shaper and begin restoring it

Good to see you've prioritised your life.


Try matching the list I gave you to all the pictures you can find on the internet of small shapers, I bet you won't find a match for it, Rodger

Just found an M25 bolt and trying to find the machine it was fitted to? :rolleyes:

Regards Ian

HoHoHoHoHoHoHo

speedy
06-19-2010, 06:03 AM
Elninio what does hahahahahahaha mean?

It's a speech impediment Alistair.

Bob Farr
06-19-2010, 07:40 AM
This one pictured here is almost identical, Bob! Mine doesn't have the motor mounted at the back like that, and is a bit beefier on the arm ... also the stand is completely different ...

In the first picture, all of the motor mount components aft of the rear edge of the drip pan on my Torpex are shop made to adapt a non-original motor. Here's a flipside view of the same machine.

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/Torpex2.jpg

I have seen this same or VERY similar machines labeled for marketing as a Sampson, Royal, Torpex or Alba with only slight variations in the casting shapes of the ram, base, or transmission housing. The differing components are all bolt-on items: perhaps this is how the end retailers distinguished their products in their various markets?

My still-forming theory is that these may be post WWII copies of an pre-war Alba 1-A design, made available in generic (or component/kit) form to importers in other countries when England was still in its "export ot die" economic recovery phase. I could easily be wrong, but there are some very close similarities.

Here's an Alba:

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/Alba1Amodel-1.jpg

My Torpex, like the Alba above, has the fixed table z-axis screw. It also has a twin meshed-gear feed mechanism for cross and vertical feed of the table, like this Sampson (stripped upper gear):

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/TorpexSampson6-1.jpg

And also like this Royal:

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/ArtiesRoyalratchetfeed2.jpg

Maybe you have yet another re-badged version of this same basic machine design? It's hard to say for sure without some more evidence.

Good luck, and please do share some pictures when you get more settled in. I'd like to see the machine.

Bob

Elninio
06-19-2010, 12:32 PM
In the first picture, all of the motor mount components aft of the rear edge of the drip pan on my Torpex are shop made to adapt a non-original motor. Here's a flipside view of the same machine.

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/Torpex2.jpg

I have seen this same or VERY similar machines labeled for marketing as a Sampson, Royal, Torpex or Alba with only slight variations in the casting shapes of the ram, base, or transmission housing. The differing components are all bolt-on items: perhaps this is how the end retailers distinguished their products in their various markets?

My still-forming theory is that these may be post WWII copies of an pre-war Alba 1-A design, made available in generic (or component/kit) form to importers in other countries when England was still in its "export ot die" economic recovery phase. I could easily be wrong, but there are some very close similarities.

Here's an Alba:

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/Alba1Amodel-1.jpg

My Torpex, like the Alba above, has the fixed table z-axis screw. It also has a twin meshed-gear feed mechanism for cross and vertical feed of the table, like this Sampson (stripped upper gear):

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/TorpexSampson6-1.jpg

And also like this Royal:

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/ArtiesRoyalratchetfeed2.jpg

Maybe you have yet another re-badged version of this same basic machine design? It's hard to say for sure without some more evidence.

Good luck, and please do share some pictures when you get more settled in. I'd like to see the machine.

Bob

Mine also has the same mesh drive, Bob; in fact, the teeth are broken on the top gear too! The knob on the ratched mechanism is identical too. Unfortunately it has a nameplate riveted on the casting rather than identification directly in the casting. On the ram knife angle adjustment the letters 'S.A' are seen. The gibbs all have '23' punched into them.

Elninio
06-20-2010, 01:26 AM
I got some very soft erasers from the art store today and managed to make the name plate readable; it reads "A.R. Williams Machinery Company". I can't seem to find any pictures of it on the net, so stay tuned ... Here's a website mentioning the company from 1916 http://blacksmithandmachineshop.com/American-Machinist-Febuary-1916-PG-1-50.html

Herb W
06-20-2010, 02:30 AM
A. R. Williams - that's the dealer's plate not the maker's. The mystery continues...;) Dig out that camera, man!

Bob Farr
06-20-2010, 09:24 AM
Herb is right, it was common for machinery dealers to attach their own identification tag on the machines they sold. A.R.Williams was the importer or dealer.

The few Torpex/Royal/Sampson machines which I've seen all had their identification tags attached (or cast) into removable parts like the column door. If I removed the Torpex tag my machine would have no identifying marks: perfect for export rebadging sales.

I'm away from the machine at the moment but I'll post some more detailed pictures for you soon. Perhaps we can solve a mystery for both of us.

Bob

Bob Farr
06-22-2010, 10:25 PM
Here are a few more pictures of different angles and stages of disassembly. Hope something catches your eye:

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/Torpex6-1.jpg

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/Torpextrans1.jpg

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/Torpextrans2-1.jpg

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/Torpex9.jpg

Bob Farr
06-22-2010, 10:29 PM
A last few:

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/Torpextrans6-1.jpg

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/Torpex8-1.jpg

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/Torpex11-1.jpg

I hope to start making progress with reassenbly of my base column and table soon. Then I'll have a place to set the ram column as I tune up the working mechanisms. Let's see some pics of your machine soon!

Bob

Bob Farr
06-25-2010, 10:54 PM
Elninio,

I hope you're making progress with the move. There's another shaper ID thread going on another site with what turns out to a Royal. The owner found some interesting literature which you may want to look at. Here's the thread:

http://www.homemodelenginemachinist.com/index.php?topic=9566.30

Good luck. Rember, pictures ...

Bob

Elninio
06-30-2010, 02:23 AM
My photo show begins at the back of the new garage taken from a mobile phone; a third garage means I can now buy more tools, and even restore them! This picture is only about 2/3 the length of the garage (there are some shelves at the back) ...

http://img189.imageshack.us/img189/6360/img00063201006292051.jpg (http://img189.imageshack.us/i/img00063201006292051.jpg/)

The shaper originally came with a 3/4hp bronze bushing motor. I ended up cleaning it by wire-brushing, and then painting with rust-paint. I left a sample overnight in oil and it seemed to resist scratching the following night, but only time will tell. This method was used on the entire machine (all parts) ...

http://img707.imageshack.us/img707/1237/img00064201006292051.jpg (http://img707.imageshack.us/i/img00064201006292051.jpg/)

"Century brand" ...

http://img132.imageshack.us/img132/6035/img00065201006292052.jpg (http://img132.imageshack.us/i/img00065201006292052.jpg/)

This plate was going to be cleaned, but I've lost interest ...

http://img807.imageshack.us/img807/3074/img00066201006292052.jpg (http://img807.imageshack.us/i/img00066201006292052.jpg/)

Stay tuned ...

Elninio
06-30-2010, 02:28 AM
Being nearly 50 years old, I decided to open it and found the cork seals to be cracked in two. I was going to cut my own but decided to go with a different 3/4hp motor I managed to acquire for a good price. The motor was running before opening, I still have the seals for reference, and the motor is free for pickup if you're in the area ...

http://img266.imageshack.us/img266/4446/img00068201006292053.jpg (http://img266.imageshack.us/i/img00068201006292053.jpg/)

Goggles are for size reference; its about as big as my 2.25hP milling machine motor! ...

http://img5.imageshack.us/img5/7416/img00069201006292053.jpg (http://img5.imageshack.us/i/img00069201006292053.jpg/)

Pulley that came with the motor, after rust cleaning ...

http://img266.imageshack.us/img266/946/img00073201006292055q.jpg (http://img266.imageshack.us/i/img00073201006292055q.jpg/)

Various parts; motor pulley, the bronze bushing that slides inside the shaper's ram's connecting rod, some 3/16ths tubing rated for 65psi, and a part of the new motor which will get its deserving paragraph ...

http://img24.imageshack.us/img24/5283/img00072201006292055.jpg (http://img24.imageshack.us/i/img00072201006292055.jpg/)

Stay tuned ...

Elninio
06-30-2010, 02:35 AM
Before continuing with the motor, I'd like to thank Eric of Hamilton for giving me this pillow block, and a needle bearing with the purchase. I could use it for a TPG. The chuck on the right is romanian-made from the communist era (my dad's). The string was used to clean the lead screws ...

http://img807.imageshack.us/img807/2143/img00067201006292052.jpg (http://img807.imageshack.us/i/img00067201006292052.jpg/)

Some misc hardware; the stop paddle is mounted into a cast-aluminum box and will swing by some sort of arm mechanism from the shaper, somehow ...

http://img243.imageshack.us/img243/7871/img00070201006292054.jpg (http://img243.imageshack.us/i/img00070201006292054.jpg/)

This is the main work area; the large screw is in fact connected to a lathe gearbox (from the lathe, of course), spraypaint is unrelated ...

http://img337.imageshack.us/img337/968/img00074201006292056.jpg (http://img337.imageshack.us/i/img00074201006292056.jpg/)

The floor underneath previous picture's table - various machine tool parts can be seen on the floor and on the failing shelves; 10x22 king lathe, mill/drill, and benchtop drillpress ...

http://img576.imageshack.us/img576/1795/img00075201006292056.jpg (http://img576.imageshack.us/i/img00075201006292056.jpg/)

Stay tuned ...

Elninio
06-30-2010, 02:41 AM
Continuing with the new motor - the motor was harvested from an old 70's or 80's photocopier that IBM used to make. These motors came with an integrated air pump (or so I've been told), and this picture shoes the back casing of it. Does anyone know what kind of fluid it looks like it would pump? The brushes are carbon (graphite?) and are forced centripetally by an eccentric rotor holding them ...

http://img39.imageshack.us/img39/4700/img00071201006292054.jpg (http://img39.imageshack.us/i/img00071201006292054.jpg/)

There are in fact four, one being stuck in the swastika-like rotor. How am I going to get it out without damaging it? ...

http://img37.imageshack.us/img37/1558/img00102201006292109.jpg (http://img37.imageshack.us/i/img00102201006292109.jpg/)

Another angle; notice the eccentricity ...

http://img139.imageshack.us/img139/8596/img00103201006292109.jpg (http://img139.imageshack.us/i/img00103201006292109.jpg/)

Finally the motor itself. It will receive paint, of course ...

http://img200.imageshack.us/img200/6647/img00101201006292109.jpg (http://img200.imageshack.us/i/img00101201006292109.jpg/)

Stay tuned ...

Elninio
06-30-2010, 02:48 AM
Cleaned up, I took a photo of the knife holder and ram components. It had some surface rust on it that was easily removed. BUT (there's always a "but", right?), these took me nearly an entire day to separate as the locking pin managed to deform the shaft just slightly to make it nearly impossible to remove. Listen to the resonance sounds of my hammer blows, I was confused into thinking I was hammering it into a dead-end, but eventually it came out ...

http://img23.imageshack.us/img23/2808/img00076201006292057.jpg (http://img23.imageshack.us/i/img00076201006292057.jpg/)

Ram guide way cleaned; the photo makes it look much dirtier than it really is ...

http://img9.imageshack.us/img9/6278/img00077201006292057.jpg (http://img9.imageshack.us/i/img00077201006292057.jpg/)

Some rust damage towards the back of the ram. I wasn't expecting this, but its no big deal. Maybe it will help by holding oil in the micro-pores? There are only a few other parts on the machine that has this kind of damage ...

http://img685.imageshack.us/img685/7051/img00078201006292058.jpg (http://img685.imageshack.us/i/img00078201006292058.jpg/)

Feed gears; the one on the left is missing teeth, but thankfully the gear is removable from the handle via a set screw ...

http://img580.imageshack.us/img580/2987/img00079201006292058.jpg (http://img580.imageshack.us/i/img00079201006292058.jpg/)

Stay tuned ...

Elninio
06-30-2010, 02:56 AM
Here's a back shot of the damn thing. While the inside is not made of brass, it still has an oil channel ...

http://img692.imageshack.us/img692/5630/img00080201006292059.jpg (http://img692.imageshack.us/i/img00080201006292059.jpg/)

This is a picture of the tool holder's Z axis screw. The stamping says '23' and this number is found on nearly all of the machine and stand's components (except few, which has no number, or a different number). String and patience was used to clean this component ...

http://img228.imageshack.us/img228/7369/img00081201006292100.jpg (http://img228.imageshack.us/i/img00081201006292100.jpg/)

A sample of some of the tooling that came with the shaper. Eric had gotten it from another fellow, and perhaps he from another. This picture is worth a thousand words, but I'll just say that those L-shaped bars at the bottom (and the one standing up) seem to be hardened and ground (based on how the wire-brush on the grinder behaved on them). There's a whole set of them ...

http://img268.imageshack.us/img268/3910/img00082201006292101.jpg (http://img268.imageshack.us/i/img00082201006292101.jpg/)

Armstrong toolholder, Chicago USA. The logo is fact of a man flexing his arm while holding a hammer, and not of a silly cartoon jester ...

http://img816.imageshack.us/img816/1756/img00083201006292102.jpg (http://img816.imageshack.us/i/img00083201006292102.jpg/)

Stay tuned ...

Elninio
06-30-2010, 03:02 AM
More hardware. Notice the camera's effect on the background -- it was not that dark in the room!

http://img192.imageshack.us/img192/8931/img00084201006292102.jpg (http://img192.imageshack.us/i/img00084201006292102.jpg/)

Nearly total picture of the machine. The metal surfaces in reality are much more reflective (and cleaner). Notice the stand's "rounded" design and curves (for identification purposes) ...

http://img341.imageshack.us/img341/581/img00085201006292103.jpg (http://img341.imageshack.us/i/img00085201006292103.jpg/)

This picture does justive to reflectiveness, but not surface quality! What's that rod at the top of the machine for? It has a keyhole on the bottom, but does not rotate at all. It can't take a belt tensioner either because, once assembled, gets really close to the pulley.

http://img823.imageshack.us/img823/8708/img00087201006292104.jpg (http://img823.imageshack.us/i/img00087201006292104.jpg/)

Very soft drafting erasers managed to reveal what this name-plate originally displayed. It says "A.R. Williams Machinery Company Limited". This is not the maker, it is the distributor. Do you think they placed the nameplate on top of some ID which may be part of the casting? ...

http://img408.imageshack.us/img408/411/img00088201006292104.jpg (http://img408.imageshack.us/i/img00088201006292104.jpg/)

Stay tuned ...

Elninio
06-30-2010, 03:08 AM
While removing the paint and bondo, I noticed the colors peeling away in the following order; [air], machine blue (similar to my color), yellow, green, black, [bare metal]. The Z screw is fixed and held by being pressed into the base and held by two set-screws ...

http://img714.imageshack.us/img714/5651/img00089201006292104.jpg (http://img714.imageshack.us/i/img00089201006292104.jpg/)

Z-axis helical gears. I disassembled these and they are, in reality, ultra polished (not dirty as in the picture). They're appearance is as internal gears to follow. Absolutely no rust damage was found on the gears and screws ...

http://img339.imageshack.us/img339/6474/img00090201006292104.jpg (http://img339.imageshack.us/i/img00090201006292104.jpg/)

Nice. A lever shifts the center piece to engage one of the two gears ...

http://img269.imageshack.us/img269/3310/img00091201006292105.jpg (http://img269.imageshack.us/i/img00091201006292105.jpg/)

Bronze bushings ...

http://img121.imageshack.us/img121/3487/img00092201006292105.jpg (http://img121.imageshack.us/i/img00092201006292105.jpg/)

Stay tuned ...

Elninio
06-30-2010, 03:14 AM
Top isometric view. No rust was found on any of the parts in this photo. Surface is better in reality ...

http://img709.imageshack.us/img709/4751/img00093201006292106.jpg (http://img709.imageshack.us/i/img00093201006292106.jpg/)

Close-up; The brown stuff at the top is not rust ...

http://img266.imageshack.us/img266/5995/img00094201006292106.jpg (http://img266.imageshack.us/i/img00094201006292106.jpg/)

Same spot, even closer yet ...

http://img143.imageshack.us/img143/8554/img00095201006292106.jpg (http://img143.imageshack.us/i/img00095201006292106.jpg/)

What do we call this piece? No rust here, although it has accumulated much of the grinding dust ...

http://img710.imageshack.us/img710/3867/img00096201006292107.jpg (http://img710.imageshack.us/i/img00096201006292107.jpg/)

Stay tuned ...

Elninio
06-30-2010, 03:18 AM
This piece doesn't fit anywhere on the shaper, and is about 25% bigger than the front of the table. Mounting holes don't line up either. It came rusty, then was cleaned, and now is filthy again ...

http://img690.imageshack.us/img690/7761/img00097201006292107.jpg (http://img690.imageshack.us/i/img00097201006292107.jpg/)

Close-up. Foot-prints are visible ...

http://img267.imageshack.us/img267/7688/img00098201006292108.jpg (http://img267.imageshack.us/i/img00098201006292108.jpg/)

In retrospect, meow meow meow meow meow ...

http://img266.imageshack.us/img266/2888/img00107201006292113.jpg (http://img266.imageshack.us/i/img00107201006292113.jpg/)

More later, stay tuned ...

http://img682.imageshack.us/img682/3786/img00108201006292113.jpg (http://img682.imageshack.us/i/img00108201006292113.jpg/)

Richard Wilson
06-30-2010, 06:10 AM
Those L shaped bars were used to fit in a T slot on a shaper or planer and the set screw tightened against the edge of the workpiece. Very handy for large workpieces too big for the vice, especially irregular shapes. Most effective in transverse tee slots to stop the workpiece from sliding during the cutting stroke.

Richard

J Tiers
06-30-2010, 09:50 AM
Wellllllllll..........

Now we got pics of the elephant's toenails....... and ear hairs....

I guess a pic of the elephant has to wait until it's re-assembled.

Elninio
09-12-2010, 04:56 PM
Here's the pictures you've been wanting:
http://img411.imageshack.us/img411/416/img00149201009072001.jpg (http://img411.imageshack.us/i/img00149201009072001.jpg/)

http://img339.imageshack.us/img339/8707/img00155201009072003.jpg (http://img339.imageshack.us/i/img00155201009072003.jpg/)

Al Messer
09-12-2010, 06:26 PM
Looks like a machine built for some serioous work! Congratulations on your rescue of some old Iron!

Elninio
09-24-2010, 03:17 AM
Could still need some help identifying the machine, fellas!

whitis
09-24-2010, 03:26 AM
Photos will have to wait; I just moved into this new house and the first thing I did was go out and buy an old shaper and begin restoring it (as opposed to unpacking boxes, painting the walls, refinishing the floors, installing new counters, ...). I know its not an Atlas, Myford or Lewis model though (knowing this from looking at various videos of small shapers on youtube).

The shaper makes one heck of a box opener :)

Your Old Dog
09-24-2010, 08:50 AM
Did you get the stuck vane out yet? I would try drilling an 1/8th hole right next to and behind it. Then holding a small chisel at a 45 degree angle try whomping it out with a BFG'ing hammer. The 1/8th" hole only needs to be a few thou deep to allow you to get the chisel into the back of the vane.

http://img139.imageshack.us/img139/8596/img00103201006292109.th.jpg (http://img139.imageshack.us/i/img00103201006292109.jpg/) Uploaded with ImageShack.us (http://imageshack.us)

Elninio
09-24-2010, 09:57 AM
Did you get the stuck vane out yet? I would try drilling an 1/8th hole right next to and behind it. Then holding a small chisel at a 45 degree angle try whomping it out with a BFG'ing hammer. The 1/8th" hole only needs to be a few thou deep to allow you to get the chisel into the back of the vane.

http://img139.imageshack.us/img139/8596/img00103201006292109.th.jpg (http://img139.imageshack.us/i/img00103201006292109.jpg/) Uploaded with ImageShack.us (http://imageshack.us)

I did get it out, I ground an old file into a miniature chisel and hammered it out that way. The first time the chisel broke, but it had opened enough of a gap for me to use a small rod to pry it out. I don't know why it seized, because there wasn't anything on the little carbon element, except for carbon smudge, when I cleaned it ...

Bob Farr
09-24-2010, 05:34 PM
Elninio,

Your shaper looks great and thanks for posting the pictures. I particularly like the nicely rounded front edge of the chip tray. Please keep posting pictures, they are very helpful to me. Does your machine happen to have an oil resevoir inside the column? Mine is empty and all of the shaft bushings are lubricated via grease Zerk fittings instead of Gitts oilers. Is yours like this too?

I finally got back to work on mine, but I won't be making chips for a while. Seeing yours has given me some much needed motivation to get back to work on it. I made a thick oak base with corner levelers to help stabilize it. The base column is paintet, so now I have someplace to reassemble the machine as I work on it.

Bob

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/Oakbase4.jpg

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/Oakbase2-1.jpg

Elninio
09-24-2010, 05:54 PM
Good to see someone has found interest in all these pictures! It doesn't have an oil reservoir, but it has oiling holes. It seems that the axle holding the gears, that are not attached to the pulley leading to the motor, is holding oil. I know this because it is probably 1/2" hollow, and the oil hole leads to it. It is the only hollow axle on the machine.

It seems that the doors on the stands of our shapers are purely decorative, as they have no shelves. Mine is even smaller - I wouldn't be able to fit my head in it! I glued the motor capacitors to the door of the stand.

Does your shaper have bevelled gears on the bull-gear for adjusting the ram stroke? Mine doesn't, and I think that will be a project I'll be undertaking ...

One last thing, I stabilized my shaper with hockey-pucks, but now chips can go underneath the machine (or expensive cutting tools!).

Elninio
09-25-2010, 02:13 AM
One thing i still can't figure out is what's the rod hanging out the side of my shaper on the pulley side, it's too close to the belt to put tension on it. It doesn't have any rotating parts or thread to hold a bearing assembly!

Bob Farr
09-25-2010, 07:26 AM
Elninio,

My guess about that rod is that it was to support a cast belt guard that is probably missing now. Look for telltale grub screw dents on the rod.

My bullgear has straight-cut gear teeth and I don't recall at the moment if there was an adjusting mechanism (other that loosening the bolt in the sliding block) used for making stroke adjustments. Most of the internal components are stored in boxes at the moment, but I'll be digging them out this weekend so hopefully I have a better answer for your soon.

Bob

Elninio
09-25-2010, 12:28 PM
A belt guard is an interesting possibility, but no such marks can be seen. I'll try asking the guy who runs the shaper column on neme-s.org