PDA

View Full Version : Crankshaft Crossing



aostling
06-20-2010, 12:43 PM
Two days ago my brother and I drove from Las Vegas to Bridgeport (where they filmed Out of the Past in 1947). We crossed Death Valley, and I was amazed that the temperatures were not even over 100F. The sixty miles north of Scotty's Castle are unpaved but well graded. I took this photo at Crankshaft Crossing, a turn-off to a really rough track which connects to the wonderful ghost town of Gold Point in Nevada. I drove that track in my Nissan Stanza twenty-five years ago.

A few more crankshafts have been added to the collection since then. Can you identify any of them?


http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/CrankshaftCrossing-1.jpg

strokersix
06-20-2010, 12:51 PM
The two right side in front look like chevy, one early two-piece seal and one later one-piece seal.

Evan
06-20-2010, 01:00 PM
I am not an expert on crankshafts but one early morning many years ago I cooked up a batch of pancakes for breakfast at the bottom of Death Valley. They turned out better than any I can recall making before. My guess is that it had to do with the higher boiling temperature of water at that altitude. Most of my camping has always been done in the mountains at elevations above 3000 feet. At 3000 feet the boiling temperature at standard temp is about 206F. At 5000 feet it is about 202F. At the bottom of Death Valley it is about 213F which acts as a natural pressure cooker to soften plant proteins and cellulosic fibres.

A.K. Boomer
06-20-2010, 01:51 PM
Wonder what those baby's are worth in scrap? ooops - probably shouldn't have said that:p

aostling
06-20-2010, 04:47 PM
At the bottom of Death Valley it is about 213F which acts as a natural pressure cooker to soften plant proteins and cellulosic fibres.

There are mine shafts in Butte which are a mile deep, but they start a mile above sea level. I wonder where the lowest point on earth is which has been visited by man, for making the best pancakes.

Welcome back from Prince George. I've had lithotripsy but your laser bombardment sounds much better. I wish the USA had a public health system as good as BC.

Doc Nickel
06-20-2010, 05:37 PM
Wonder what those baby's are worth in scrap?

-Not much. :D

They're typically nodular iron, and from what I've seen (probably different on the East Coast) cast iron is one of the least valuable scraps. Probably wouldn't be worth the gas it took to drive out there.

But Stroke's right- the two at the lower right are pre-'85 (left, partially obscured by a rock) and post-'85 (right) small-block Chevy. The one standing vertically is probably Volkswagen flat-4. The one immediately to the left of it, with the scrap of heavy wire at the end, is, I think, flathead Ford V8.

On the left, the grouping of three; the middle one is a Buick 215 V6.

Some of the others look familiar, but if you can't see that it has one key or two, or has a squarish flywheel face or a slightly rounded one, or has a big balancer bolt instead of a small one, could go to any number of engines.

The one on the fencepost, for example, looks odd enough to be something like a Model T, or at least of that vintage. The one laying across the nose of the one I think is a Flathead crank, is clearly another flat-4. Another Volkswagen? Earlier? Later?

Interesting photo at any rate. :D

Doc.

jugs
06-20-2010, 05:46 PM
[quote=Evan] I am not an expert on crankshafts quote]

It's in black & white folks.
john
:D

Gravy
06-20-2010, 06:30 PM
-Not much. :D

They're typically nodular iron, and from what I've seen (probably different on the East Coast) cast iron is one of the least valuable scraps. Probably wouldn't be worth the gas it took to drive out there.

But Stroke's right- the two at the lower right are pre-'85 (left, partially obscured by a rock) and post-'85 (right) small-block Chevy. The one standing vertically is probably Volkswagen flat-4. The one immediately to the left of it, with the scrap of heavy wire at the end, is, I think, flathead Ford V8.

On the left, the grouping of three; the middle one is a Buick 215 V6.

Some of the others look familiar, but if you can't see that it has one key or two, or has a squarish flywheel face or a slightly rounded one, or has a big balancer bolt instead of a small one, could go to any number of engines.

The one on the fencepost, for example, looks odd enough to be something like a Model T, or at least of that vintage. The one laying across the nose of the one I think is a Flathead crank, is clearly another flat-4. Another Volkswagen? Earlier? Later?

Interesting photo at any rate. :D

Doc.

By memory from about 30 years ago, the vertical one is not from a VW flat four unless it's aftermarket. None of the factory cranks had counterweights or a flange. That's all I've got.

Doc Nickel
06-20-2010, 07:51 PM
By memory from about 30 years ago, the vertical one is not from a VW flat four unless it's aftermarket. None of the factory cranks had counterweights or a flange.

-Really? Hm. That was kind of a guess (as are some of the others) because it was the only common flat-4 I could think of. However, now that I think about it, most 4-cylinders, flat or not, use 180-degree cranks. For some reason I was thinking a typical inline-4 would have the same 90-degree crank like a V-8, but that's not right, is it?

That being the case- it being almost any fourbanger- I can't even guess. Everybody made a 4-cylinder at one time or another...

Admittedly the only ones I'm pretty positive of are the pre-'85 Chevy crank, and the Buick crank- the latter obvious due to the offset-paired throws, an effort to make an even-firing V-6.

Doc.

Doc Nickel
06-20-2010, 08:37 PM
It's in black & white folks.
john

-While it's more rarely seen than ethics in a congressman, Evan does, in fact, have a sense of humor. :D

Doc.

Gravy
06-20-2010, 08:50 PM
Other than old VWs, I can't tell one from another. After twenty-some years as an auto mechanic, I've worked on a whole lot of cars, but I never worked on any one variety often enough to memorize the details.

terry_g
06-21-2010, 01:12 AM
The large crank on the lower left side looks like one from a Detroit Diesel 8V92.
I used to work on them.

Terry

aostling
06-21-2010, 02:30 AM
The large crank on the lower left side looks like one from a Detroit Diesel 8V92. I used to work on them.
Terry

Terry,

You get the prize. For extra points, what's that lizard looking at the lone camshaft in this collection? It resembles the zebra-tailed lizards I occasionally see in Arizona, but it has more stripes.

http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/Crankshaftlizard.jpg

doctor demo
06-21-2010, 02:43 AM
The large crank on the lower left side looks like one from a Detroit Diesel 8V92.
I used to work on them.

Terry
I was going to guess early Cat, but I will yield to the man from Detroit:D

Steve

Doc Nickel
06-21-2010, 03:12 AM
For extra points, what's that lizard looking at the lone camshaft in this collection?

-Dunno, but the cam's also out of a small-block Chevy. :D

Doc.

Evan
06-21-2010, 07:52 AM
He looks like a large banded gecko but seems to have the hind legs of a running lizard like a zebra tailed lizard.

saltmine
06-21-2010, 11:40 AM
He's probably going to steal it.

Gonna put a com in his Rombler

A.K. Boomer
06-21-2010, 01:02 PM
-Not much. :D

They're typically nodular iron, and from what I've seen (probably different on the East Coast) cast iron is one of the least valuable scraps. Probably wouldn't be worth the gas it took to drive out there.

But Stroke's right- the two at the lower right are pre-'85 (left, partially obscured by a rock) and post-'85 (right) small-block Chevy. The one standing vertically is probably Volkswagen flat-4. The one immediately to the left of it, with the scrap of heavy wire at the end, is, I think, flathead Ford V8.

On the left, the grouping of three; the middle one is a Buick 215 V6.

Some of the others look familiar, but if you can't see that it has one key or two, or has a squarish flywheel face or a slightly rounded one, or has a big balancer bolt instead of a small one, could go to any number of engines.

The one on the fencepost, for example, looks odd enough to be something like a Model T, or at least of that vintage. The one laying across the nose of the one I think is a Flathead crank, is clearly another flat-4. Another Volkswagen? Earlier? Later?

Interesting photo at any rate. :D

Doc.


Actually -- there's not a single VW flat four crank out there.

The one standing has a variable pattern multi bolt flywheel and its way to long, flat four VW cranks are unique in design in that they use many small uniform pattern dowels and a massive center "gland" bolt complete with needle bearings inside for the pilot bearing, they are also way way shorter than the one shown as the flat four and the V/4 (saab) is one of the most compact four (lengthwise) other than that of a square four or radial.
could just be an inline four or perhaps a flat six.

There's a stubby crank off to the left of it but its not a VW either - the crank throws on VW flat fours are either 0 degree's or 180 degrees,
it makes for a crank that sits totally flat, the one shown in the pic has 60/90/or 120 degree's offsets, Its got stubby going for it but Im thinking V4 saab.