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View Full Version : Show us your small home built machines !



nheng
06-21-2010, 09:38 PM
I hope this topic has not been covered at any time in the recent past :)

Show us your small home built machines. I'm talking small, precision drill presses, small lathes (think Levin size or so), small milling machines (Evan's is too big to qualify ;) ), grinders and more.

It would be especially interesting to see special or limited purpose small machines such as a tiny lathe that is based on a 5C collet as the main work holder but tiny in all other respects. Or maybe a drill press for #60 and lower drilling. Perhaps a tiny horizontal mill for a special use.

I guess I'm thinking 1 to 1.5 toasters in size.

Den

john hawkins
06-21-2010, 09:53 PM
Removed the spindle, bored it to take a draw bar. Tapered the spindle nose for the WW collets. Made a draw bar out of SS. Now I can turn an eye lash. Started to make a block so that I can use my dremel hand piece to use as an ID / OD grinder. BTW a light dimmer makes a nice speed control. Also got onto the motor so that with a flick of a switch I can run the lathe in reverse.
The unimat is my first lathe, 1968. Now have a 10EE. and a B'port

darryl
06-22-2010, 01:47 AM
Here are several pictures of a drill press I built for drilling pc boards. It has an x-y table which if I'm not mistaken has a range of 6x8 inches, or maybe it's 8x10- I don't remember. I built this about 25 years ago. I don't think I've posted this before-

http://www.glacern.net/free_photo_upload/pc%20drill%20press%201.jpg

http://www.glacern.net/free_photo_upload/pc%20drill%20press%202.jpg

http://www.glacern.net/free_photo_upload/pc%20drill%20press%203.jpg

http://www.glacern.net/free_photo_upload/pc%20drill%20press%204.jpg

The thing is built from 1/4 inch and 1/2 inch mdf, and is heavily fiberglassed. The green coloring is something I had left over at the time, so I used it. Mistake- it took the better part of ten years to finally cure to a non-tacky finish. It was dry and hard to use after a couple days, so no problem, but the tackiness stayed on- and on- and on- it was the fault of the color, not the hardener or the resin- strange, but true. Anyway, the motor is something I made up from parts in my usual way- doubled up the length of the armature stack and the magnet stack, rewound of course, etc. The slides are drawer slides, same on the x-y table. The slide assembly itself can be repositioned up or down, then the motor head can be cranked up or down like a drill press. I made the helical rack for that myself, and it's spring loaded so you can let go the knob and it stays where you leave it. Between the two motions I've got about a 5 inch vertical range of motion.

Underside you can see the threaded rods which are my leadscrews. I get .050 per full turn of those knobs, so it's easy to get .1 inch spacing for the dual inline ic packages (remember those?). There's a couple of buttons that you can press to release the split nuts and rapid traverse the tables.

darryl
06-22-2010, 01:50 AM
http://www.glacern.net/free_photo_upload/pc%20drill%20press%205.jpg

You might be able to see the drill bit in it right now. Maybe not- it's pretty small. I got a set of those carbide drills that have 1/8 inch shanks and come in several bit sizes. That's normally what I use for pc board drilling. Easy enough to mount with that dremel type collet chuck.

http://www.glacern.net/free_photo_upload/pc%20drill%20press%206.jpg

http://www.glacern.net/free_photo_upload/pc%20drillpress%207.jpg

Somewhere there you can see a green wire coming off the motor. I feed it from an adjustable power supply, and normally use about 30 to 40 volts. In one of the pictures I have the tables moved full left and rearwards. In another pic I have the table full right and forward. I was trying to show the range of motion- .

http://www.glacern.net/free_photo_upload/pc%20drillpress%208.jpg

I've had pretty good luck using drawer slides for things like this. The motor assembly is somewhat pinched in there, and there's no play but it operates smoothly. If this wasn't the case, I'd be snapping carbide bits like toothpicks. My lathe drill press also uses these slides, under some pinching as well to remove slop, and it's been good.

I dunno- does that fit the 1 1/2 toaster size category?

Evan
06-22-2010, 03:19 AM
How about a 20,000 rpm spindle that fits inside an R8 collet?

I kind of promised George I would write an article on how to build it but I haven't gotten around to it yet. Maybe I will if enough people want to see it. For some reason I really don't like writing articles for publication. I have in the past for other magazines and it really takes me a long time.

http://ixian.ca/pics7/microspindle.jpg

Peter.
06-22-2010, 03:33 AM
I think there'd be a lot of interest in that Evan. Handy to be able to use a small carbide cutter in a conventional mill, if that's what it allows!

Circlip
06-22-2010, 04:46 AM
Which bearings and drive source Evan, no, seriously.

Regards Ian.

ldn
06-22-2010, 04:58 AM
Darryl,

Love the PC board drill press. I'm curious about how the button to release the split nuts works. Could you post a close up of that mechanism?

Also, how do you operate the up/down motion of the drill?

DFMiller
06-22-2010, 08:19 AM
Darryl,
As usual a very nice piece of work.
Evan,
I would definitely be interested in learning more about your spindle. It looks like the perfect solution for engraving etc.
Dave

Duffy
06-22-2010, 09:59 AM
Evan, That is a 3/4" R-8 collet. Could your spindle ALSO fit an M-3 collet? Then I would want the build article on my wish-list too.

Evan
06-22-2010, 10:05 AM
What is the ID of an M-3 collet?

Circlip
06-22-2010, 10:16 AM
Which end??:D

Dragons_fire
06-22-2010, 10:49 AM
i posted this a little while ago, but here it is again. a little CNC lathe for doing woood turnings. I have only used it to make the pawn from the emc2 sample file, but eventually it will be used for pens, chess pieces, mini baseball bats, and anything else i can think of to fit.

http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t305/dragons_fire_photo/CNC%20Lathe/P1000541.jpg

http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t305/dragons_fire_photo/CNC%20Lathe/P1000532.jpg

http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t305/dragons_fire_photo/CNC%20Lathe/th_P1000514.jpg (http://s163.photobucket.com/albums/t305/dragons_fire_photo/CNC%20Lathe/?action=view&current=P1000514.flv)

TheAndroid
06-22-2010, 10:58 AM
How about a 20,000 rpm spindle that fits inside an R8 collet?

Want!!!!!!

Evan
06-22-2010, 11:04 AM
OK, I'll do the article. It may take a while though. I will say that there are no special order parts.

boslab
06-22-2010, 01:40 PM
Evan,
Have you been tinkering with a time machine or does Canada have 72 hours in a day?, how the hell do you do it all, you never cease to amaze me.
all the best
mark

vpt
06-22-2010, 05:48 PM
Evan,
Have you been tinkering with a time machine or does Canada have 72 hours in a day?, how the hell do you do it all, you never cease to amaze me.
all the best
mark



His computer is right next to his mill in his living room, he sits on the couch and plays with his mill every day all day long. :D



The bolt is a wonderful idea by the way!

Your Old Dog
06-22-2010, 05:50 PM
Evan, is the article done yet?

Evan
06-22-2010, 05:55 PM
I will tell you the secret. No internet in the shop(s). The computer that runs my milling machine is stripped to the bare essentials that it takes to run Mach 3. It boots in 17 seconds. No internet even close to the shop. My main workstation is upstairs as far from the shop as possible.

topct
06-22-2010, 05:58 PM
Evan, is the article done yet?

When all the I's and all the T's are dotted and crossed, the article will be done. :D

Evan
06-22-2010, 05:59 PM
Evan, is the article done yet?


I just finished the outline.







http://ixian.ca/pics7/outline.gif

jugs
06-22-2010, 06:09 PM
I just finished the outline.







http://ixian.ca/pics7/outline.gif

Can you simplify that, it look a bit to complex for some of us :eek: :D
john
:)

The Artful Bodger
06-22-2010, 06:25 PM
Have I posted this one before?

The machine...

Recent pictures of a machine I made 25 or so years ago, I could put a stack of blank floppy disks in the top hopper and run my little program to make copies of the software we were distributing at the time. When the disk was done the unloading jack tilted the floppy drive up and the disk was enjected down the chute. The drive returned to the operating position and the loader slide pushed the next disk into position.


http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2619/3731150098_3549303297_o.gif


Unloader jack:
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2465/3731150220_b95c28834d_o.gif

The Artful Bodger
06-22-2010, 06:26 PM
Continued.......


The loader jack:
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2567/3730354841_49ae1dc754_o.gif

The loader slide:
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2489/3731150352_47526069f1_o.gif



Opened up
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2644/3730355001_a3a2e243be_o.gif

Eject position
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2482/3731150472_264be9e0a6_o.gif

Frank Ford
06-22-2010, 07:28 PM
Here's a little milling rig I made up for routing slots in guitar bridges - it rides on linear bearings in three dimensions, and tilts to 20 degrees:

http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Blogs/37D28/37SetupViews/37setup04s.jpg

http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Blogs/40D28/40D28Bridge/40d28bridge16s.jpg

Frank Ford
06-22-2010, 07:31 PM
A very simple little wood lathe, specifically for altering the taper of guitar bridge pins:


http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/Projects/BridgePinLathe/bridgepinlathe31.jpg

It holds the decorative top of the pin a double-angle collet, and the end in a cup center:

http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/Projects/BridgePinLathe/bridgepinlathe33.jpg


http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/Projects/BridgePinLathe/bridgepinlathe15.jpg

JoeBean
06-22-2010, 08:20 PM
Recent pictures of a machine I made 25 or so years ago, I could put a stack of blank floppy disks in the top hopper and run my little program to make copies of the software we were distributing at the time. When the disk was done the unloading jack tilted the floppy drive up and the disk was enjected down the chute. The drive returned to the operating position and the loader slide pushed the next disk into position.

Very clever... Mother necessity I guess.

Black_Moons
06-22-2010, 09:17 PM
Is it done yet evan? I need some info about that outline too, How was it made so.. rectangle and lineish? :)

But seriously, what powers that 20,000rpm spindle?

Duffy
06-22-2010, 09:33 PM
Evan, Largest ID of an MT-3 collet is 3/4". (My error, I originally said M-3-What that is I have NO idea-blame it on a senior moment.)

Evan
06-22-2010, 10:01 PM
I wondered about that. It will fit in a 3/4" hole.

The motor will be explained in the article. Don't get too anxious. There is usually a fairly long lead time for publication, probably about six months.

TGTool
06-22-2010, 10:08 PM
Here's a little milling rig I made up for routing slots in guitar bridges - it rides on linear bearings in three dimensions, and tilts to 20 degrees:

http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Blogs/37D28/37SetupViews/37setup04s.jpg



Very nice! And it reduces the pucker factor of laying your arm across the top and lining up the back saw. :D

darryl
06-23-2010, 01:07 AM
Sorry for the poor pics- it wasn't easy to get the light, the camera, and my fingers coordinated- but this probably will show the split nut method I used.

http://www.glacern.net/free_photo_upload/split%20nut%201.jpg

http://www.glacern.net/free_photo_upload/split%20nut%202.jpg

First pic shows the split nut closed on the leadscrew, second pic shows it opened. In this case, it's an easy reach under the table to put two fingers on the bolts sticking out each side of the mechanism to open the nut. The two halves are spring loaded.

The nut itself started as what they call a coupling nut- basically just a long nut. I bent some brass into a U shape to carry the nut halves. Each piece of brass pivots on the brass pin you can see between the leadscrew and the red screw. With the mechanism built and the nut cut in half lengthwise, I positioned the nut halves in the brass pieces and let the springs close it up. The leadscrew positions the nut halves to suit, and epoxy holds them into the brass pieces.

Looking at this today I have to admit it's rather crude, but the concept is still viable. Because the nut halves are spring loaded, they come to bear against the leadscrew with some pressure, thus removing play in the threads. If the part where they hinge away from the leadscrew is made to pivot without end float, there's basically no backlash. Because the nut halves are epoxied into place relying on the leadscrew to properly position them, the alignment is right on the money. This contributes to a solid engagement and a greater area of thread surface carrying the load at all times.

The second axis mechanism is the same as this one except for the method of opening the nut. I see there's a piece of nylon string strung over a little pulley and coming out sideways, where I have a tab that can be pressed which pulls the string. The string pulls on both levers that the tips of my fingers are pulling on in the picture. My fingers release the nut for the X axis, and pressing the external tab releases the nut for the Y axis.

Another pic or two coming to show the downfeed-

darryl
06-23-2010, 01:31 AM
Ok, heres a couple showing the downfeed mechanism. The winch drum is spring loaded and basically just balances the weight of the motor and its attached drawer slide parts. Both the rack and the helical gear are made from jb weld. The rack is epoxied in place, and the gear is turned via the knob to raise and lower the motor.

http://www.glacern.net/free_photo_upload/downfeed%203.jpg

http://www.glacern.net/free_photo_upload/downfeed%205.jpg

Can't really see it, but just behind the 'head' and between the head and the threaded rod you see is a wedge. This wedge pinches the outer drawer slide parts into its own tracks, which I see I molded to suit out of epoxy putty. You can just see a bit of that on one side at the front- The wedge is spring loaded, and is released by pushing up from the bottom. That loosens the tracks to allow the entire head to slide up and down about 3 inches or so. That's just basic positioning of the head to accommodate different lengths of drill bits, or different heights of workpieces. Normally it would be a piece of pc board material on a sacrificial backing.

This was built a long time ago- looks like I put a lot of time into it.

macona
06-23-2010, 06:37 AM
Heres a circuit board mill I made about 5 years ago for a friend out of parts found in his surplus store. Sloooowww... But I am running it as fast as it can with the limit of voltage I can put through the stepper drivers.

The mount for the dremel is not installed in these pictures.

We did take it to Maker Faire in 2008 and were cutting out name badges with it. Thing ran 2 days straight without stopping.

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1422/4727164232_8f0aa8c3ec_b.jpg

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1110/4726514893_431f4ed943_b.jpg

Evan
06-23-2010, 08:13 AM
This is a flat bed plotter I built back in about 1982 or so. It uses three phase variable reluctance steppers with only descrete power transistors with pre drivers which are directly driven by the I/O port on a 1 mhz 6502 machine. All plotting drivers were implemented in machine language including fonts and various graphics primitives such as best line between points. Maximum plotting speed was around 10 inches per second (600 ipm) with a resolution of about .001". Variable reluctance steppers are capable of very high rpms since they have very low steps per rev. These motors are 12 steps per rev which is why the compound gearing.

The platen is removed so the components may be seen.

http://metalshopborealis.ca/pics/plot1.jpg

This is a sample plot from it:

http://metalshopborealis.ca/pics/plot2.jpg

nheng
06-23-2010, 08:18 AM
Nice work guys! Keep it coming.

Den

topct
06-23-2010, 11:40 AM
I built this out of Taig lathe parts and one of their small milling tables. It has an XY of about 8x10 inches. The head can tilt over 90 degrees and has a Taig compound mounted under the head as a substitute for a quill.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v78/topct/P1010006.jpg

Your Old Dog
06-23-2010, 12:56 PM
Evan, I looked over your outline and think you might have what writers call writers block. Let me try to get you started....


"It was a dark and stormy night, the squirrels were busy packing their nuts out on the front porch in the driving rain. The dog stirred restlessly near the back door. I would have been scared to death but I had a more serious problem on my mind. I needed an accurate way to..... " (take it away Evan)

Evan
06-23-2010, 02:03 PM
...think you might have what writers call writers block...

30,000 plus http://ixian.ca/pics7/roflmao.gif

DICKEYBIRD
06-23-2010, 02:13 PM
I built this out of Taig lathe parts and one of their small milling tables. It has an XY of about 8x10 inches. The head can tilt over 90 degrees and has a Taig compound mounted under the head as a substitute for a quill.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v78/topct/P1010006.jpgMan, I like that X-axis power feed. Even Tim Allen would be happy with that one!;)

snowman
06-23-2010, 02:46 PM
Evan...has anyone ever mentioned how lucky you are to have such a wonderful stash of motion control products from your days at xerox?

damn timing pulleys are expensive. but fourth axis for the cnc mill is somehow more expensive....so i'm in a standstill :)

Evan
06-23-2010, 03:27 PM
damn timing pulleys are expensive. but fourth axis for the cnc mill is somehow more expensive....so i'm in a standstill

Well, this is directly on topic. Make a slotter like this one. It is my favorite small machine that I have built and I still use it for inside keyways. I used it to make the timing pulleys for my mill.

http://metalshopborealis.ca/pics/hs1.jpg

http://metalshopborealis.ca/pics/hs2.jpg

http://metalshopborealis.ca/pics/hs3.jpg

http://metalshopborealis.ca/pics/pulleya1.jpg

davidh
06-23-2010, 06:48 PM
evan, i don't suppose you have an any drawings or sketches on your beautiful slotter ?

Evan
06-23-2010, 08:37 PM
No plans I'm afraid. Maybe a few more pics will explain better.

http://metalshopborealis.ca/pics/hs5.jpg

http://metalshopborealis.ca/pics/hs6.jpg

http://metalshopborealis.ca/pics/hs7.jpg

http://metalshopborealis.ca/pics/hs8.jpg

aboard_epsilon
06-23-2010, 08:57 PM
ive a couple of electric actuating screws with all controls from electric chairs ..wonder if they could be used as a lathe slotter.

all the best.markj

nheng
06-23-2010, 11:00 PM
How about a small pneumatic cylinder with a simple switched valve arrangement and a push-pull double action cylinder?

Evan, how much force would you estimate would be needed from the cylinder based on your experience and the leverage of your current design? Looks like you must have at least 10:1 there?

Seems like you could build a small shaper this way ... as long as the cylinder stays tiny ... looks like 460 lb force cylinder (McMasters) is about 2.6" diameter, 8.5" long for a 3" stroke. I suppose you could use a longer stroke and lever it too.

Den

snowman
06-23-2010, 11:13 PM
Wasn't this hashed and rehashed a while back? I think Evan even designed a cylinder assembly that stroked automatically.

Evan
06-23-2010, 11:18 PM
I have never posted this image before. Laugh all you want but it actually worked. :D :eek:

http://metalshopborealis.ca/pics/hscut0.jpg

I was going to build this actuator for the express purpose of operating the slotter but my milling machine has taken over most of those duties.

http://metalshopborealis.ca/pics/ppu1.gif

I have posted all this before but there are a lot of new people that haven't seen it.

CCWKen
06-24-2010, 12:16 AM
I built this power hammer a while back. No fancy CNC controls though. Just flip a switch to start the motor then press the foot pedal to start the hammer. I keep it setup with shrinking dies but I have a few shaping dies for metal work. Hey, it's a machine! :D

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/CCWKen/ToolBox/Power%20Shrinker/PowerHammer.jpg