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dp
06-26-2010, 01:31 AM
In the current issue of the home town paper "The Okanogan Valley Gazzette", (North Central Washington) there's a story about a colorful fellow who held many jobs over the years from air mech to graphic artist, to traveling salesman, milkman, chef, logger.... typical of the depression years. You did what you could to eat.

George Daly passed away at 96. Claimed his favorite job was working for the Washington Fish and Game department in the 1930s. He was on Lake Washington for the first fish plantings by air - they dropped the fish from aircraft in 5 gallon buckets. They "mostly survived". :)

Reminds me of WKRP Cincinnati:

"As God is my witness, I thought turkeys could fly"

Any other "DOA" ideas out there?

Peter N
06-26-2010, 03:13 AM
Any other "DOA" ideas out there?

This one?? :D http://panthermotorcycle.com/Home.html

dp
06-26-2010, 03:17 AM
I was thinking somebody would mention the BP BOP, but that's a good one!

speedy
06-26-2010, 03:18 AM
My suggestion to use poultry feathers to help mop up the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico ?? :D

.RC.
06-26-2010, 03:37 AM
The ejector seat on a helicopter...

Your Old Dog
06-26-2010, 07:34 AM
1. co-axial indicator on a mill/drill.

2. New coat of paint on John Stevenson's Bridgeport.

MuellerNick
06-26-2010, 07:46 AM
DOA-present: Scooter for a one-legged.
DOA-idea of a bike-mechanic I know: When I use the tap on the other side of the nut, I do have to rotate it the other way round.


Nick

Evan
06-26-2010, 09:28 AM
http://metalshopborealis.ca/pics2/rabbitseaten.jpg

Black_Moons
06-26-2010, 01:41 PM
The ejector seat on a helicopter...

Actualy some helicopters HAVE ejection seats.
The trick is they mount the rotar blades to the rotar with explosive bolts.
Blow the bolts and the rotars fly out sideways to the helicopter. Hope your not flying next to it. :)

A.K. Boomer
06-26-2010, 02:29 PM
Here's an all time classic; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hindenburg_disaster

recoilless
06-26-2010, 02:42 PM
Reminds me of WKRP Cincinnati:
"As God is my witness, I thought turkeys could fly"

But, weren't they frozen turkeys?
Long Live Les Nessman

vpt
06-26-2010, 03:01 PM
Shag carpet.

X-ray fitted shoes.

Any sort of govrnment spending.

Drilling for oil under water.

mklotz
06-26-2010, 03:08 PM
Supersonic blimp.

Thermonuclear hand grenade.

Circlip
06-26-2010, 03:18 PM
Here's an all time classic; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hindenburg_disaster


I can never understand why Hydrogen was used when Helium was the safer option?


Regards Ian.

Dr Stan
06-26-2010, 03:27 PM
I can never understand why Hydrogen was used when Helium was the safer option?


Regards Ian.

Because we (the US) was refusing to sell helium to Nazi Germany.

Pete F
06-26-2010, 03:31 PM
But, weren't they frozen turkeys?
Long Live Les Nessman

Nope. After they landed they released the remaining turkeys. Les said "It was almost like they counter-attacked."

-Pete

Weston Bye
06-26-2010, 03:33 PM
Applies to a multitude of Ideas that didn't make it:

Anything prefaced by "Here, hold my beer and watch this..."

Tony Ennis
06-26-2010, 03:53 PM
I can never understand why Hydrogen was used when Helium was the safer option?

Hydrogen is easy to make, is dirt cheap, and lifts far more than helium. Helium is hard to find (I think it has to be found and pumped out of the ground) and thus expensive.

ptjw7uk
06-26-2010, 04:27 PM
Helium is removed as a by product from natural gas.

peter

Evan
06-26-2010, 04:59 PM
Helium is removed as a by product from natural gas.


Yep. Which is from a time in the history of the earth before it had all escaped from the atmosphere.

Dr Stan
06-26-2010, 05:09 PM
Anything prefaced by "Here, hold my beer and watch this..."

Or, "it sounded like a good idea at the time". :D

saltmine
06-26-2010, 05:09 PM
How about flying cars?

Several have been built and even attempted to sell them publicly.

One of the recent ones was a group working out of Santa Paula, Calif. that coupled the wings of a large Cessna to the unlikely body of a Ford Pinto.

The inventor/designer was killed when it crashed.

oldtiffie
06-26-2010, 05:18 PM
"Of course I'll love you in the morning"

MuellerNick
06-26-2010, 05:53 PM
... to the unlikely body of a Ford Pinto.
The inventor/designer was killed when it crashed.

And I always told him: "Use a AMC Pacer!"
The good thing is, the Pacer is already DOA (pun intended?).


Nick

krutch
06-26-2010, 05:54 PM
How about the 'endangered' dessert turtles? To keep track of them the 'protectors' branded them with a number. After it was noticed the population was declining, someone figured out the branding was destroying the reproductive organs of the turtles. This really happened.
Or for that matter, airbags. The inflation is by chemical reaction. But the chems. will fowl up your heart beat and can kill ya if they burn and ya catch a wiff.
Just a couple of examples of the Gov. saving ya even if they have to kill ya to do so!

Dr Stan
06-26-2010, 06:44 PM
Or for that matter, airbags. The inflation is by chemical reaction. But the chems. will fowl up your heart beat and can kill ya if they burn and ya catch a wiff.
Just a couple of examples of the Gov. saving ya even if they have to kill ya to do so!

However, an air bag kept my wife who weighs <100 lbs from serious injury in a head-on collision.

bborr01
06-26-2010, 06:49 PM
Applies to a multitude of Ideas that didn't make it:

Anything prefaced by "Here, hold my beer and watch this..."

Good one.

Brian

clutch
06-26-2010, 07:08 PM
Because we (the US) was refusing to sell helium to Nazi Germany.

Yup. I wrote a paper on dirigibles and blimps that a Jewish literature professor that escaped Nazi Germany thought would be a dead end.

Reading the newspaper microfiche's of the time was fascinating.

We, the US, had a lock on helium production and wanted the Germans to keep using hydrogen in the case we needed to shoot down dirigibles carrying bombs in the event of war.

Clutch

kf2qd
06-26-2010, 08:08 PM
Yep. Which is from a time in the history of the earth before it had all escaped from the atmosphere.

There were Natural Gas/Helium wels in Central KS, OK and the Texas Panhandle that were considered strategic during WW2. There is a Hysterical (sorry - Historical) Marker on Highway 169 west of Wichita that refernces "the gas that wouldn't burn.

The references I find talk of 8% helium in the gas from the wells, but it may have been higher if there was any natural separation.

It is also suggested that the helium is a result of alpha particle activity.

Weston Bye
06-26-2010, 09:30 PM
Ideas that didn't make it:

Any Idea that resulted in a Darwin Award.

Arcane
06-26-2010, 09:38 PM
I'd say this guy's idea ranks right up there! :D

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=097_1277293817

PeteF
06-26-2010, 10:35 PM
Come in sucker award of the year, runner up 2009, I bring you ... The Gravity Plane [applause]

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0QZ1KzveIic

Dr Stan
06-27-2010, 12:09 AM
Come in sucker award of the year, runner up 2009, I bring you ... The Gravity Plane [applause]

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0QZ1KzveIic

A perpetual motion machine, what will they come up with next! :rolleyes:

Instead of selling derivatives of underwater mortgages Wall St could sell share in Gravity Plane Inc. ;)

sansbury
06-27-2010, 12:44 AM
I can never understand why Hydrogen was used when Helium was the safer option?

IIRC the bigger problem was that they painted it with a dope that had qualities approaching those of Thermite.

Bill736
06-27-2010, 02:13 AM
1. My marriage

2. Doing free favors for neighbors

3. A great new car called the Edsel

4. Trying to bail out General Motors with taxpayer's money

5. Trying to set a new speed record in the maiden voyage of the Titanic

6. Waiting until all 22 inches of snow fell before trying to clear my 400
foot long driveway.

7. Hiring those two drunk guys with a frontloader to clear my driveway.

wierdscience
06-27-2010, 03:35 AM
I can never understand why Hydrogen was used when Helium was the safer option?


Regards Ian.

I was told it was because Germans have a fetish for anything that burns or explodes.Hince the hydrogen and magnesium that turns up in nearly everything they built then and now:D

Circlip
06-27-2010, 04:30 AM
Spose this was the originator of "Friendly fire"

Regards Ian

saltmine
06-27-2010, 11:37 AM
Speaking of ideas that didn't make it....

how about this one?


Bailing Chrysler out, again and again, and again, with taxpayer dollars.


Bailing out Wall Street, Fannie May, and Freddie Mac.....so they can go right back and do it again.

saltmine
06-27-2010, 11:57 AM
Hydrogen was used as a lifting gas since man first started flying balloons.

It does lift more weight per cubic foot than anything else, it's relatively cheap and abundant, but, during the time when the Hindenburg was built, the US was the only country in the world that could supply the enormous quantities of helium Germany needed to use as a lifting gas. Unfortunately, for the Germans, Hitler and the Nazi Party were in control of the Germany and the United States boycotted the sale of inert helium to Nazi Germany. One reason they did was due to the memory of German Zeppelins bombing London in the first World War.

Had there been some of the fuzzy thinking liberals like we have today, back then, they would have campaigned to let the Germans buy precious helium and the Hindenburg disaster would most probably never happened. Unless, that is, the Hindenburg was sabotaged, and then helium would have been a moot point.

Hugo Eckener had a brilliant idea with gasses. Why not use it as a fuel? Count Von Zeppelin did experiment with fuel cells aboard Zeppelins filled with "Blau gas", which is similar to natural gas, as a fuel. The great thing about blau gas was the fact that it weighed nothing, so the weight and balance of the Zeppelin would not change as fuel was burned off. More cargo could also be carried. But, like a lot of other "alternate fuels", blau gas was sidelined by cheap, abundant supplies of natural gas, and gasoline.

.RC.
06-27-2010, 04:29 PM
2. New coat of paint on John Stevenson's Bridgeport.


Well actually I would say Sir John buying a bridgeport in the first place. :D

Deja Vu
06-27-2010, 04:50 PM
A perpetual motion machine, what will they come up with next! :rolleyes:

Instead of selling derivatives of underwater mortgages Wall St could sell share in Gravity Plane Inc. ;)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0QZ1KzveIic

I don't think the aircraft was proposed to be perpetual, but rather the fuels required between each flight would be mostly compressed air. The other fuels would be a combination of combustion and electrical both to sustain the airship per trip. The question is more about the energy required and consumed for refueling.

Arcane
06-27-2010, 05:03 PM
Here's one some of you might remember...the nuclear powered aircraft.

PeteF
06-27-2010, 05:32 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0QZ1KzveIic

I don't think the aircraft was proposed to be perpetual, but rather the fuels required between each flight would be mostly compressed air. The other fuels would be a combination of combustion and electrical both to sustain the airship per trip. The question is more about the energy required and consumed for refueling.

The whole thing would never fly (literally). I'd suggest the initial "concept" was a product of an April fool prank, but hats off to them as it was quite amusing.

Deja Vu
06-27-2010, 05:34 PM
While following the links provided in this thread and seeing this (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/06/25/the-stupidest-mens-produc_n_625532.html#s101538), I realized that what I was holding in my hand at the first garage sale I attended just hours later was none other than the same item. I put it down but my wife wanted me to wear it, so she bought it. Well, I consented to don it but only after we got to the car.
Hey! the rest of the day was rather fun! .....wore it the whole day!

..evidence.. yours truly,:D
http://memberfiles.freewebs.com/78/43/42124378/photos/data/Hair%20head.JPG

Incidentally, the black sweatshirt is for cooler days but mostly for disguising myself late into the night so that I can insert a BB or two into the feline thugs who prowl the night thinking nothing of snatching our wildlife....namely little "Hopper', the rabbit who would surely be eaten if I wasn't out there keeping the enemy at distance.:( I take little pleasure in standing at attention for hours just to pass a message to those critters that are left to roam the neighborhood in a beastly manner. I think I've got the upper hand now, though. The hunters become the hunted!:eek:

edit in... Oh! The propane cylinder was $5 bucks with assorted fittings and hoses in good shape.

vpt
06-27-2010, 05:43 PM
Nice sweat shirt!

Deja Vu
06-27-2010, 06:20 PM
The whole thing would never fly (literally). I'd suggest the initial "concept" was a product of an April fool prank, but hats off to them as it was quite amusing.

Why so? Where does the plane fail in being able to achieve flight?
Buoyancy really hasn't been explored fully as yet today from what information I have been able to gather.
I would surmise that things would have to slow down, though, from the "rat race" we live in today.

Evan
06-27-2010, 06:34 PM
Here's one some of you might remember...the nuclear powered aircraft.


That was strictly a political decision. A variant of the NERVA rocket engine was completely tested and ready to fly when the program was cancelled.

gnm109
06-27-2010, 06:39 PM
This one?? :D http://panthermotorcycle.com/Home.html


Durn! you beat me to it. If ever there was an idea that was DOA, it's that. How did they get ahold of the Panther name, anyway? The Panther was a real motorcycle with actual metal, paint and rubber. This cyber nonsense asking for investors is beyond the pale.

You are so right!

Deja Vu
06-27-2010, 06:49 PM
That was strictly a political decision. A variant of the NERVA rocket engine was completely tested and ready to fly when the program was cancelled.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_thermal_rocket
Oh boy! If we can't safely get oil out of the ground without lapses, how would we ever allow ourselves to transport such devices into space? :eek:

I can picture the first meeting of those in control of the project after they have convinced the world that it is perfectly safe when someone speaks up with....."Do we feel lucky?":D

saltmine
06-27-2010, 07:24 PM
I seem to recall back when I was a snot-nosed kid, Popular Mechanix ran an article about a nuclear powered B-36 bomber.

At the time, they had flown the reactor and several tons of lead shielding to protect the crew...but had not figured out how to use the reactor to power the six propellers. I was all for using the reactor to generate steam, driving turbines, which drove huge generators. The power generated could then be used to drive large electric motors.

The joke at the time was the crew would have to land periodically to re-enlist.

BTW, one of my co-workers (who was bald) came to work one day wearing a similar hat. Nobody noticed it for hours, until one of the parts girls commented; "Nice rug, dude."

saltmine
06-27-2010, 07:29 PM
I already invented a perpetual motion machine back in the '70's, it has never used any energy, made any energy, or does anything

gnm109
06-27-2010, 10:47 PM
I read about a fellow who had created the Elixir of Youth. Unfortunately he had been jailed for fraud several times. He was selling the stuff to the public and was arrested in Liverpool, England in 1836, in New York City in 1910 and in again in Los Angeles in 1937. When last heard from he was living in Dubai with his 17 wives.

Evan
06-27-2010, 11:19 PM
Hell yes I can fly it. Here, hold my beer.

(Newly purchased helicopter)

http://ixian.ca/pics7/noinstructor.jpg

PeteF
06-27-2010, 11:51 PM
Why so? Where does the plane fail in being able to achieve flight?
Buoyancy really hasn't been explored fully as yet today from what information I have been able to gather.
I would surmise that things would have to slow down, though, from the "rat race" we live in today.

John, I don't want to go through the whole process again. Sorry I sincerely don't mean to sound rude, but are you able to do a search on PM for this? Precisely why it won't fly was pretty well summed up there I believe, both by myself and others involved in the industry. I guess the bottom line however is that it would be unable to achieve the required buoyancy for the weight required for the energy storage medium ie it defies the laws of physics. If anyone chooses to believe otherwise I'll let them have it as I can't see any point in arguing about it, it was clearly developed as a joke.

Pete

Deja Vu
06-28-2010, 12:01 AM
John, I don't want to go through the whole process again. Sorry I sincerely don't mean to sound rude, but are you able to do a search on PM for this? Precisely why it won't fly was pretty well summed up there I believe, both by myself and others involved in the industry. I guess the bottom line however is that it would be unable to achieve the required buoyancy for the weight required for the energy storage medium ie it defies the laws of physics. If anyone chooses to believe otherwise I'll let them have it as I can't see any point in arguing about it, it was clearly developed as a joke.

Pete
Oh I don't want to argue...and I really didn't mean that that particular plane could fly. A modified design using the concept of adjustable air displacement with helium is only what I was talking about.
So, although it has been proven that the plane in question just won't fly, I was wondering what criteria in modifications would have to be met to bring the aircraft to a state of flight.
Is it that to hold air at the usable pressures would require a holding system that just can't be made lightly while still having some semblance of streamlining?

Don't feel you have to respond to this drivel.

PeteF
06-28-2010, 12:21 AM
John sorry it was a while back that we went through this and I can't recall the specifics, but do recall most of the questions were answered at the time on PM. If you're able to have a read through that I think my colleague did an excellent job of explaining the situation.

One thing in aviation you're always fighting is weight, and yes compressed gas as an energy storage medium would be particularly inefficient. To give you an example, we've probable all seen the damage done by a heavy gas cylinder when the top is somehow compromised, but consider the weight versus the energy released (I think this was demonstrated in an episode of Mythbusters as I recall), now compare the same amount of energy using a small controlled explosion and a fuel source.

Dirigibles are one of those vehicles that sometimes look good in theory but invariably fall well short in reality. Which is a bit unfortunate really as sometimes it would be nice to see the wheel turn full circle.

Sorry that was a pretty lousy explanation of a good question, but if you can't find the PM thread send me a message and I'll provide the link.

Pete

Deja Vu
06-28-2010, 12:42 AM
message sent. I see your point more closely now. I'm envisioning an airship that would rival the Hughes spruce goose in practicality.

The Artful Bodger
06-28-2010, 01:08 AM
John sorry it was a while back that we went through this and I can't recall the specifics, but do recall most of the questions were answered at the time on PM. If you're able to have a read through that I think my colleague did an excellent job of explaining the situation.

One thing in aviation you're always fighting is weight, and yes compressed gas as an energy storage medium would be particularly inefficient. To give you an example, we've probable all seen the damage done by a heavy gas cylinder when the top is somehow compromised, but consider the weight versus the energy released (I think this was demonstrated in an episode of Mythbusters as I recall), now compare the same amount of energy using a small controlled explosion and a fuel source.

Dirigibles are one of those vehicles that sometimes look good in theory but invariably fall well short in reality. Which is a bit unfortunate really as sometimes it would be nice to see the wheel turn full circle.

Sorry that was a pretty lousy explanation of a good question, but if you can't find the PM thread send me a message and I'll provide the link.

Pete

If I am not mistaken the Hindenberg used gaseous fuel, 'blaugas' or some similar name.

Evan
06-28-2010, 01:11 AM
Compressesd gas as an energy storage medium is spectacularly inefficient. Unless the heat of compression is somehow prevented from leaving the gas nearly all the energy used to compress the gas is lost as heat. It isn't analogous to a spring. It's like making an engine that burns gasoline to move a piston but the piston is locked in place until the burnt gases cool to ambient. Then the piston is allowed to move and recover the tiny bit of pressure left from converting a squirt of liquid to a gas.