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lost_cause
06-27-2010, 04:52 PM
anyone have any pics/descriptions of their homemade coolant/lubrication systems? i will be using my mill/drill so infrequently that i don't see myself going for any sort of commercial setup. in all honesty, i've never seen anyone with one of these personally, so all information and details are good for me to absorb. in fact, i don't think i know anyone with more than an old drill press, and the only sort of lubrication or cooling came from whatever can of penetrating oil was nearby. i am very handy however, and can probably find and cobble together something if i have a little direction on what might work. i mean everything: pumps, reservoir, lines, coolant, etc.

thanks.

hornluv
06-27-2010, 05:13 PM
If you're going to use it infrequently, I would avoid any kind of soluble oil system, as it quickly grows a skin and gets skunky if it isn't used regularly. You could always just use a spray bottle with whatever lubricant you or your material prefers.

dexter
06-27-2010, 05:18 PM
My homemade lubrication/cooling sytem on my drill press consists of a open topped reservoir that was removed from an old power hacksaw and a parts washer pump. A few brackets were welded in place to hold it under the table where the coolant could drain back through the existing center hole. The parts washer pump was connected via some gasline, to a magnetic based flexible coolant nozzle. The total cost was less than $50. It works perfectly. Sure makes drilling easier.

I would imagine a pump in a bucket with a flexible return line would work just as well (which incidentally was my first thought).

dexter
06-27-2010, 05:23 PM
I have found that if you cut soluble oil with winsheild washer antifreeze or 50/50 auto anti freeze it will last indefinitely. Mine has been in place for years with no problems what so ever. It also will not freeze in the winter. I do have to add water to the mix occasionally.

Kart29
06-27-2010, 05:34 PM
I've been thinking about the same kind of thing for use with my benchtop mill/drill. I think a mister would work better for me than a flood coolant system. I was thinking about making my own but then I came across the Spra-Kool Midget and figured that's cheaper than anything I could make myself unless I just happen to find some component parts laying around.

jugs
06-27-2010, 06:12 PM
Be careful with mist, you need to get the droplet size right, if part of the spay is atomized you get fog, when you breathe it in, the oil content coats your lungs & stays there [ not good ].

there are anti fog units available.

john
:)

H8Allegheny
06-27-2010, 06:16 PM
They're not exactly cheap, but you might want to consider a vortex cooling gun and avoid the hassle of coolant all together.

Brian
Taxachusetts

KiddZimaHater
06-27-2010, 06:28 PM
The easiest way to rig a coolant system would be a 5 gallon bucket with a small fish-pond pump in it.
Elevate the pump on a brick so swarf will settle below it.
Install a small valve to control the outflow, and the return line from the mill table goes back into the bucket.

jugs
06-27-2010, 07:02 PM
They're not exactly cheap, but you might want to consider a vortex cooling gun and avoid the hassle of coolant all together.

Brian
Taxachusetts

Very effective, but they use a lot of air

john
:)

Michael Edwards
06-27-2010, 07:03 PM
The easiest way to rig a coolant system would be a 5 gallon bucket with a small fish-pond pump in it.
Elevate the pump on a brick so swarf will settle below it.
Install a small valve to control the outflow, and the return line from the mill table goes back into the bucket.

That's what I have been using on my mill for about 8 years. The soluble oil coolant has never been changed out, only added to. I have used a couple of different brands, it has never been stinky. I must be lucky, I'd rather be lucky than good any day. :)

ME

jugs
06-27-2010, 07:35 PM
Be careful with mist, you need to get the droplet size right, if part of the spay is atomized you get fog, when you breathe it in, the oil content coats your lungs & stays there [ not good ].

there are anti fog units available.

john
:)

PS here's one > http://www.fogbuster.com/howthefogbusterworks.html

Uncle O
06-27-2010, 08:13 PM
I use this at home and a pop bottle with a tiny hole in the lid at work.....can't get much cheaper than that.

http://i170.photobucket.com/albums/u278/Ohboy_album/coolant_bottle.jpg

Mcgyver
06-27-2010, 08:33 PM
hand atomizer, you know, squeeze the trigger a spray comes out...... pick them up in the garden section. a jug full will last a fairly long time.

lost_cause
06-27-2010, 08:40 PM
hand atomizer, you know, squeeze the trigger a spray comes out...... pick them up in the garden section. a jug full will last a fairly long time.

pretty much the equivalent of how i have always done it. was hoping for some elegant little home brewed automatic system so i can use one hand to run the mill/drill, and have the other one free in case i feel the need to scratch myself, or do something equally as useful.

Rich Carlstedt
06-27-2010, 09:03 PM
I don't buy the argument about not using soluable oil for coolants.
I have had the same Mobil oil in my (5 gallon pail ) system for 10 years. I just add water and oil when it's low. Never smells , never develops a skin/crud, and does not bother my hands.
The secret is so very simple.
I put a UV light in the 5 gallon pail whenever I run it.
I have let it set in the pail (w/cover) for upto 6 months and no issues.
The UV destroys any and all bacteria...just don't have it shine on you.
When the pump goes on, so does the light.
The return drain has the coolant flow down the side of the pail to ensure total exposure .
To collect chips and not mess up the garden pump in the pail, The return line has a knee high stocking installed to act as a chip seperator. I tie-wrap it to the return line in the pail. Put your pump in a small plastic bowl about two inches high. Any fine chips that do get through the stocking will sit on the bottom and not go over the top of the bowl into the suction chamber. My coolant is about 6 inches deep in the pail

If the coolant starts to turn pinkish, from light tan, I know the bulb burned out. So I replace it
Turn it on and let it run overnight, and all is tan the next day
It is automatic.
I have never had to discard any...never
You do have to skim the tramp oil that accumulates however
Rich

Mcgyver
06-27-2010, 09:48 PM
lost, thats the low budge way, not necessarily the elegant way.

a current major project of mine is a central coolant system, remotely controlled from each machine. I pine for Rich's 10 year success but have 7 machines that want flood - and I like flood a lot.....but it is daunting to build all the infrastructure seven times over (pump, uv, bubbler, skimmer etc). Plus with 7, guaranteed there's always going to be one needing attention.

so elegance for me is a central system with all the bells and whistles. It'll be on wheels with a drain plug for scrubbing down outside if necessary and have a large intake filter, skimmer, UV light (aquarium recirculating style, bubble and electronic start/stop from the machine.

its turning out to be a big project, but aren't they all

meanwhile that 1.99 atomizer is doing the trick

jb-mck
06-27-2010, 11:30 PM
For my band saw I had a coffee can, a $15.00 fountain pump from HF, and a cake pan for a coolant system. It actually worked well but looked like *%*$. I recently upgraded to a system my wife bought me for Christmas. Much better than my getto system.

The Artful Bodger
06-27-2010, 11:31 PM
A low budget coolant system I rigged up for my cold saw consisted of nothing more than a can suspended above the machine with a pet cock and a short hose that reached to where the coolant was needed.

toolmaker76
06-28-2010, 08:29 AM
I second the pop bottle with a small hole in the lid. Used a spray bottle for many years, but have gotten arthritis in my hands- it got uncomfortable to constantly pump. So, saw a 20 oz. pop bottle, drilled a little hole in the lid and never looked back.

Over the years I have seen many rigged up coolant systems using coffee cans and pails and so forth. I always like the "ingenuity" method.

One of the machines I worked on had an oil leak- right into the coolant. Eventually using the coolant would be like coating everything with wax- very difficult to clean up after machining. So I built a tramp oil skimmer.

The drinking water supply in that shop came from coolers using bottled water, the bottles being every bit of 5 gallons. One had a bad spot in the bottom, unrecyclable, so I just drilled a little hole in it. I sat it down on the machine table and proceeded to run the coolant through it, a little faster than it could drain out. Left for lunch and when I came back, I had a bottle that had some coolant in it and about a 4 inch layer of oil. Stopped the coolant flow and let the bottle drain until there was very little coolant left in the bottle and mostly oil.

Had a high tech method of plugging the hole- put my finger over it- and took it to the waste oil barrel and let it drain there. The machine was good to go for a couple more months. One thing about it, in over a year of use I never had to replace the coolant in that machine, where other machines got so funky they had to have the coolant cleaned out on a regular basis. I figured that the oil on top of the coolant kept air from reaching it and kept if from going bad!

H8Allegheny
06-28-2010, 09:49 AM
Very effective, but they use a lot of air

john
:)

John,

That's true - I had to upsize my compressor to handle even one gun, let alone two, but when I considered that:

1. I only needed one set up for ALL of my machine tools as I could move the guns where and when I needed them by using heavy duty magnetic bases;

2. I no longer had to buy, mix, test, and most importantly, clean up after using liquid coolant;

3. I no longer have to smell burned or rancid coolant;

4. I have noted no diminution of tooling life; and,

5. That in general I have a much cleaner shop and finish cuts as good if not better than with flood coolant,

I would never go back.

For those that may have never heard of them, here are two links:

http://www.arizonavortex.com/

http://www.pelmareng.com/Spot_Cooling_Systems.html

Brian
Taxachusetts

wooleybooger
06-28-2010, 08:16 PM
frenchs mustard bottles,the twist to open kind. i mainly use them for thread cutting oil. i use carbide because i havent rigged up a pump yet but i do have a fountain pump i plan to use with a loc-line hose and valve someday.

jagans
07-12-2010, 10:08 AM
Hi Guys, First Post

Easiest: Solvent Resistant Spray Bottle

More Involved: A simple gravity fed system where a container above feeds a hose to the work, then solvent drains to a container below. When the lower container is full, switch them. Valves would make it easier to switch out.

I would be very careful about solvent mixing with electricity, and I wonder if aquarium pumps are rated for solvent. Just a thought.

I have often wondered why lube systems are so expensive, not much to them.

Liger Zero
07-12-2010, 10:20 AM
Toss a mouse in the coolant tank for maximum lubrication effect: No one will stick around once they discover they are breathing rotting mouse fog.