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View Full Version : Clausing vs Millrite Vs Rockwell



Nicad
06-30-2010, 05:57 PM
Does one of these medium sized mills have a quality or operational advantage over the others? I would like to buy a US made Mill in very good shape. For the love of the machine, I would be most interested in the one with the best build quality. Comments appreciated.

bob_s
06-30-2010, 06:19 PM
So why not consider TREE in with that bunch.

Oh yeah, you wouldn't want anything that was made in Ca.

Like ex-prime minister Creten said "We want the high tech, high paying jobs, " - not the low paying jobs that form the basis of every successful economy in the world. What would you expect from someone who learned economics from a moron like pee air turdo.

Nicad
06-30-2010, 06:33 PM
So why not consider TREE in with that bunch.

Oh yeah, you wouldn't want anything that was made in Ca.

Like ex-prime minister Creten said "We want the high tech, high paying jobs, " - not the low paying jobs that form the basis of every successful economy in the world. What would you expect from someone who learned economics from a moron like pee air turdo.
Didn't know there was a Canadian option other than an Excello (Which I think is too big for my needs and hard to find that will run on 220V)
What is a TREE?

My shop is a bit of a Canadian tool museum overall, as I have a few pieces of General and Beaver wood working tools.

legendboy
06-30-2010, 07:40 PM
I can only comment on the millrite. Its likely the most capable of the 3 machines you listed in terms of travels, rigidity and weight.

I like mine but it is a very basic machine.

Waterlogged
06-30-2010, 07:54 PM
Clausing, Rockwell and then Millrite from smallest to largest. It can be a challenge to find any of them in really good shape so find a nice one and be happy. Upgrade if or when you feel like it as each will hold it's value or apreciate over time.

I've owned a Clausing (and a Taiwanese copy) and currently own a Rockwell. Both are roughly the same size but the Rockwell is a little more robust and has an R8 spindle. Some Millrites have an R8 spindle as well but why not just get a Bridgeport or equivalent at that point? Being able to find parts for a Bridgeport has it's advantages. You can do a full comparison by joining the Yahoo Groups for each and going through the "files" section to compare specs.

JCHannum
06-30-2010, 08:05 PM
The Tree is a good machine, but it is Bridgeport sized.

Of the three machines mentioned, the Millrite is a bit larger and more rigid. The Rockwell and Clausing have the advantage of being capable of being dismantled into manageable bits, making them easier to install in a basemant shop or other shop with limited access.

The Rockwell has an R-8 spindle, the Milrite can have a MT#2, 3, 4, B&S#10, 30 taper or R-8 spindle, the Clausing is available in MT #2 or B&S#7 only. The Rockwell is available in horizontal, vertical or a combination of both.

Any one of the three is a good machine for the small shop. I have a Rockwell vertical and an pleased with it. I would be less concerned with which one I found, but more concerned with finding one in good shape.

Rex
07-01-2010, 11:21 PM
I looked at all 3, plus the Asian 6x26s, before buying a Millrite
Mine is the later Green Powermatic/Houdaille w/36" table, and it was in great shape. Most of these were used in labs and home shops rather than industry, so not many of them are worn out.
If you fine a bright metallic green "little BP" with a white racing stripe, grab it.

shapeaholic
07-03-2010, 09:35 AM
I used to own a Rockwell with a Bridgeport "M" head. Nice mill within it's limitations...

But
Check this out

http://crownassets.pwgsc.gc.ca/mn-eng.cfm?snc=wfsav&sc=enc-bid&scn=50029&lcn=193573&lct=L&srchtype=&so=ASC&sf=ferm-clos&lci=&str=1&ltnf=1&test=1#topOfCADC

Pete