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KIMFAB
07-01-2010, 10:38 PM
I have been on here trying to figure out what to do about a worm gear from my recently acquired Dean Smith lathe.

I figured I might as well tell the whole story of its acquisition and subsequent return (I hope) to use.

While browsing in one of my favorite locations I happened upon a 13" DSG lathe that was waiting to be made into Chinese manhole covers.
It had been abandoned out in the weather because the owner had purchased a CNC and it was no longer needed.
I had heard of the quality of the DSG and as I was looking for a heavier lathe than my 11" Logan I decided to see if This unit was available for a decent price.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/hlathea001.jpg

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/hlathea002.jpg

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/hlathea003.jpg

After weeks of intense negotiations the machine was mine for a computer KVM switch and a scanner, installed of course.

Vernon
07-01-2010, 10:49 PM
Diamond in the rough What a great find!!!!!!!!!!!!!! good luck on getting it home. Would like to see picture when done. Vernon:)

Mcgyver
07-01-2010, 11:02 PM
that'll send guys scurrying around the scrape yard :D. For those not familiar, its quite a lathe....think of a modest 13x42 envelope weighing in at 5100lbs :eek: and with 7.5 hp motror. Cut metric, imperial, BA module and diametrical pitches from the gear box, micrometer adjusted taper attachment. neat little tricks like built in provisions to for indexing up to 12 mulit start threads and set screws on the outboard side of the spindle to fix long stock. you can't even hear a change in its sound when biting into a 200 thou depth of cut. lots of fun :D

dp
07-01-2010, 11:09 PM
Hmmm - if you go back there, unscrew those little plastic balls on that DeWalt radial arm saw :) They're really hard to find!

KIMFAB
07-01-2010, 11:20 PM
The first thing that needed to be done was to make the trek to Vegas and pick the machine.
This was a nice, 1 hour trip each way in 105 degree weather.
Finally got back though and started to access damages.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea019.jpg

The lathe was filthy so the first thing was to get it ready for an initial hose down.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea022.jpg

I needed to remove the motor (440 volt 3 phase 7.5 hp) so I could hit the unit with the Hotsy and degreaser.
I wasn't worried about the rest of the unit after what it had been through and it would be completely torn down anyway.

I popped the cover and documented the wiring as best I could but I'm thinking 7.5 hp 3 phase from my single phase capability might be a little much.
Besides I just happen to have a single phase 5 hp lying in the back waiting to be used.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea034.jpg

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea036.jpg

KIMFAB
07-01-2010, 11:48 PM
After pulling the machine into my welding area to get out of the sun (105 degrees, remember?) I pulled off the carriage and shafts for later cleanup.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea064.jpg


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea049.jpg

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea052.jpg

This is where I noticed the previous owner had used lots of grease instead of the necessary oil for lubrication, causing the worm gear to prematurely wear.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea055.jpg

There is lots more to go including the saga of the cover, the cleanup and more on the gear.

I'll try to get more in but I'm also dealing with a broken wife and a couple of paying jobs that come first.

JoeFin
07-01-2010, 11:55 PM
Great score on the lathe

You'll enjoy the machine all the more for having done the restoration.

Keep us posted on your progress

ldn
07-02-2010, 02:03 AM
I am very interested to see how this comes out, so please, keep posting as you make progress.

Jim Shaper
07-02-2010, 03:36 AM
Whoever did that should be fed to the machine and die a slow and painful death.

Good luck with the restoration.

wierdscience
07-02-2010, 08:38 AM
Nice haul,good God man that carrage is a sewer isn't it?Probably had the same thoughts I do when I see a mess like that.

Pressure washer and rain coat-or-puddy knife and caustic vat?:)

Mcgyver
07-02-2010, 09:21 AM
while you have the apron apart, does yours have a feed/leadscrew interlock? Mine doesn't or its been removed/broken....but i couldn't detect any design provisions or remnants....the manual makes mention of an interlock but that's a web manual; not sure for what year. Did you find an interlock?

KIMFAB
07-02-2010, 10:30 AM
Mcgyver
I was kind of wondering about an interlock. The half nuts were frozen when I got it but so far I haven't seen evidence of any.
However it was hot when we took it apart and I had help that kept getting ahead of me.

I ended up with a small shaft and a spring that I so far cannot explain the location or use for. It was just lying in the bottom when I turned the apron over after taking out some other parts.
The cleanup of the apron is next so I will be spending some time checking it out more closely.

KIMFAB
07-02-2010, 10:35 AM
Nice haul,good God man that carrage is a sewer isn't it?Probably had the same thoughts I do when I see a mess like that.

Pressure washer and rain coat-or-puddy knife and caustic vat?:)

Pressure wash twice AND putty knife AND caustic vat AND solvent soak and then a lot more hand work.
I need to find out what kind of grease that is, it stands up to everything.

lazlo
07-02-2010, 12:33 PM
I hate to bring this up, but you might consider cleaning all the rust off the ways and measuring the wear before you get involved in a huge rebuild.

Any machine that's been left outside for long periods of time is highly suspect.

boslab
07-02-2010, 12:50 PM
Ive seen that orange grease before in a pump, its designed to hang on i think, would someopne out there who shall be namless unless he does it again refrain from comments lilke 200 thou cuts, and BA, Module and metric from the gearbox, its perverse, i have to sleep you know and instilling iron lust, well its just plain wrong, now i want one.
good find, keep it up
regards
mark

Mcgyver
07-02-2010, 01:07 PM
Mark, yeah I'm busted, using another guys thread to brag about my lathe :D guilty as charged....but i sense you are deserving and there's one in your future


I ended up with a small shaft and a spring that I so far cannot explain the location or use for. It was just lying in the bottom when I turned the apron over after taking out some other parts.

i hate when you end up with parts left over. what you have, I think, is the detent for the feed trip....goes in a vertical hole and falls out when the worm drive assembly is removed



Mcgyver
I was kind of wondering about an interlock. The half nuts were frozen when I got it but so far I haven't seen evidence of any.
However it was hot when we took it apart and I had help that kept getting ahead of me.



part of me thinks there's no way something that basic would be missing then again they had some extreme attitudes - at some point they added interlocks but maybe ours from from an era when the view was more puritan; harrumph! Sir there is no need - a meticulous operator worthy of our machines would never engage both, good day!

kendall
07-02-2010, 01:35 PM
Nice! always like seeing old lathes get rescued! Looks like a real workhorse to me.

Was wondering though, did you rescue that old rockwell radial arm saw too?

Ken.

Alistair Hosie
07-02-2010, 02:14 PM
You're obviously a great engineering guy so a great find for a great guy. With your enthusiasm I am looking forward to seeing the rest of this .With lot's of potential,make it better than new.I almost feel for those old gals just like they were animals or humans I want to see them get better it's so sad to see a great machine wither in a scrap yard good luck Brother and keep us posted please (wow this is going to be great) .Alistair

Deja Vu
07-02-2010, 02:17 PM
...awaiting anxiously for your next picture!

Your Old Dog
07-02-2010, 05:53 PM
Are we there yet? Are we there yet? :D

KIMFAB
07-02-2010, 07:42 PM
I'm going to jump ahead here a bit for mcgyver.
The apron is too heavy for my bad back, I have had two operations on it and don't need another.
I kludged together a hanger so I could put the apron an old engine stand I built many years back so it would be easier to work on.
No, I did not find any evidence of a leadscrew lockout mechanism.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea196.jpg

I guess the DSG people assumed that if you were smart enuf to run the lathe and figure out the almost infinite feeds and speeds that it is capable of you would know enough to not pull two levers at once.
I'll let Mcgyver chime in here with another example of all that. His machine is almost a twin of mine.

Anyway, where were we? Oh, yeah cleanup.
Got it parked in the drive, 6 cans of degreaser in hand and ready to fire up the Hotsy.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea078.jpg

A quick hose down and now the lathe can be touched without being engulfed in grime.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea082.jpg

Now we are ready to move to the other side of the farm and the real work begins.

Lazlo
Yes the cross slides are pretty boogered up but the hardened ways are good. I did some test razor knife scrapings and even the rustiest looking spots clean up OK.

KIMFAB
07-02-2010, 08:21 PM
Here we are in the back of the big house. That's what my grandson calls the shop I had to build to house my Shizuoka mill.
That story is here http://www.kimfab.com/shiz/shiz.htm

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea087.jpg


The lathe had to suffer one more indignity. I removed the coolant pump, plugged the holes and filled the tray with a nice lye solution.
The cross slides then went in to soak in the hot desert sun.

The rusty box in the background is my lye soak tank. I have run many engines thru it over the years and they all come out nice and pristine.
It ended up with the apron.

At the end of a 116 degree day I measured 135 degrees in the tank.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea094.jpg

I can already hear the screaming and the gnashing of the teeth "he put the apron and cross slides in lye?
It's OK, I'll be giving them at least two more cleanups

Robin R
07-02-2010, 08:50 PM
I would be surprised if a DSG of that vintage did't come with an interlock, my 1947 Holbrook has an interlock and it was made fior a similar class of work. I would suggest posting a question on the DSG thread on PM, there are enough owners on there that someone should have an idea.

wierdscience
07-02-2010, 10:50 PM
Hendey didn't use an interlock either.The reason why is you can use both feeds along with the taper attachment to cut tapers greater than the taper attachment could manage by itself.
In addition to that by engaging both feeds at once a perfect 45* angle can be done under powerfeed.Comes in handy for bevel gears and valve seats.

wierdscience
07-02-2010, 10:56 PM
The lathe had to suffer one more indignity. I removed the coolant pump, plugged the holes and filled the tray with a nice lye solution.
The cross slides then went in to soak in the hot desert sun.

The rusty box in the background is my lye soak tank. I have run many engines thru it over the years and they all come out nice and pristine.
It ended up with the apron.

At the end of a 116 degree day I measured 135 degrees in the tank.

I can already hear the screaming and the gnashing of the teeth "he put the apron and cross slides in lye?
It's OK, I'll be giving them at least two more cleanups

You won't here that from me,hot caustic is the only thing this side of a flame thrower that will gut that goo.

Lathe is looking better all the time.

Robin R
07-02-2010, 11:25 PM
I was refering to an interlock between threads and feeds, engage both at the same time and it will cause severe damage.

wierdscience
07-03-2010, 12:06 AM
Ahh..okay,do the feeds have clutches on a DSG?

desertbob
07-03-2010, 11:01 AM
Kimfab

You might find this of interest. Bob
http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/general/dean-smith-grace-lathe-owners-164418/

KIMFAB
07-03-2010, 11:41 AM
Yeah I started in that thread about entry 292.
That brings up the saga of the missing cover.
When I got the machine it was missing a cover. The problem is that there is a brass plate on the cover that gives feeds and speeds.

While a replacement cover could be constructed, the info was needed for later use.
When I was looking at the lathe at first I noticed a broken bolt lying on it, Didn't think much of it except it was a shouldered bolt that looked like one on the other side.
Well I asked if anyone had info on the cover and got replies from Ray (RDL) and Mcgyver.
Rays machine was a 59 and was slightly different but Mcgyvers machine was the same.
I got pictures from both so I had the info.

Later I got to thinking about that bolt. If it were there then there was a chance that the cover got broken off there and was still around.
I went back with an image in my head of what I was looking for and sure enough buried under the rubble was the cover.
As Darth Vader would say "the circle is now complete"

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea200.jpg

Gotta get moving and get something done before it gets too hot.

Mcgyver
07-03-2010, 11:57 AM
Later I got to thinking about that bolt. If it were there then there was a chance that the cover got broken off there and was still around..

that is fantastic - saves you a lot of work and it'll look 100%, glad you found it

KIMFAB
07-04-2010, 01:47 PM
After soaking for a week and cleaning the main body of the lathe I started to take the smaller pieces out for cleaning.
First up was the upper crosslide.

http://www.kimfab.com//pictures/DSG/lathea113.jpg

This cleaned up reasonably easily and was set out for final cleaning.
I put all of the small parts in tuna cans to keep them together and prevent loss.

http://www.kimfab.com//pictures/DSG/lathea120.jpg

Next I tackled the lower crosslide. As you can see it has a broken piece.
Any one know where I can get a replacement? I'm afraid I'll just have to make one.

http://www.kimfab.com//pictures/DSG/lathea126.jpg

Here is where I ran into some real problems. The gib was stuck and the screws would only turn about half a turn.
I ended up tightening the gib screws and running a bottom tap carefully in the holes.
It finally came apart but I spent half a day playing with it.

http://www.kimfab.com//pictures/DSG/lathea133.jpg

KIMFAB
07-04-2010, 11:25 PM
Spent a nice leisurely day finishing the steps to the pool and tracking down and cleaning oil holes.
It seems the Bijur oiler on the front of the apron is only for oiling the longitudinal ways. It comes out of the bottom, thru a copper pipe and up to a hole in the mating surface. (green)

Another five oil points are fed from a reservoir that is filled from a top oil point. (blue)

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea208.jpg

As expected it got nasty again when I flipped the apron over.
The oil from the pump comes up to the apron (green) and down a long, gunk filled tube to holes positioned over the ways.(red)

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea205.jpg

Was a long procedure of shove a wire in, pull it out, rinse, and repeat. Took quite a while before it came out clear.

By the way, for those concerned, I checked back and the Rockwell saw is still in use for making pallets and crates.

KIMFAB
07-18-2010, 10:42 PM
Finally cleaned an area in the big house and dragged the lathe inside where I can work in air conditioned comfort.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea138.jpg

I opened up the transmission for cleanout (it was half full of water) and removed the leadscrew and drain spout.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea145.jpg

Luckily the only damage was a lot of fluffy oil-water junk that I got rid of with an alcohol spray rinse and several Marvel oil washes.
I then filled it with some cheap hydraulic fluid and Marvel. After I run it a bit like this I''ll drain, rinse and fill with the proper oil.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea180.jpg

Got all the parts laid out for the final cleanup and assembly.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea215.jpg

KIMFAB
07-18-2010, 10:56 PM
Removed the rack gear, cleaned up the side and reinstalled the transmission side cover. A quick shot of paint here helped make it look better.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea219.jpg

The bearing for the feed shaft is worn pretty bad so I'll have to make a new one.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea006.jpg

Got the shaft chucked up here for its cleanup on the bearing surface. I mounted the bearing block on the Lagun so there was no whipping of the shaft.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea224.jpg

Next up. Wiring and motor install, hopefully.

I have to buy a new pulley and am kind of thinking of what the top speed should be. Right now it is 1000 rpm but I will be doing a lot of aluminum.
On the other hand I don't want to burn up the bearings.

Mcgyver
07-18-2010, 11:05 PM
looking good. I sold my standard modern last week, rearranged the shop to take advantage of the extra sq ft, moving the DSG's was a pleasant reminder of how solid they are :rolleyes:

The compound is interesting - the post for the QCTP is built in? looks like the casting is round to fit the bast of the QCTP whereas mine has the more typical T slot. I know mine had the factory 4 way tool post option...guess that what you get with the QCTP option

KIMFAB
07-18-2010, 11:19 PM
The QCTP post is mounted in a hole and secured with a setscrew. I removed the setscrew and it does not want to budge.
I haven't gotten to trying any removal tricks yet but if and when it comes out it will be just a post with a larger diameter on the bottom.

I'm thinking of modifying it to fit a BXA Aloris style holder that I have. I also have a friend that threatened to get me a turret.
Toolholders for the DSG OCTP seem a little scarce on this side of the pond.

Twmaster
07-19-2010, 01:14 AM
Even with all the abuse and neglect that old beastie is starting to look great!

KIMFAB
07-30-2010, 02:02 AM
Back to the machine.

Pretty much gutted the electrical. I will be reusing the front panel controls so that wiring was left but the relay plate was removed for possible later use.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea239.jpg


The original 7 1/2 hp 3 phase motor was a bit much. I didn't need that much power and I didn't want to spend the money necessary to run it on single phase.
I already had a good single phase 5 hp in stock waiting to be used. All I had to do was figure out how to make it turn in the right direction.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea230.jpg


Got the motor running OK but with the new pulley it did not line up with the one on the lathe and there was no adjustment.
A chunk of 1/2" plate and some angle, a few welds, some milling, drilling and tapping and we have a DSG approved adapter plate.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea264.jpg


Mounted up, temporarily wired in and ready for the belts.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea268.jpg

KIMFAB
07-30-2010, 02:11 AM
Next up is the headstock. I was concerned about the appearance of the clutches but after oiling them up and trying them by hand they seem to work OK.
No water here but it obviously needs a few rinses. While I was doing this and checking the pan I found a loose bolt lying in the bottom.
Took a bit of fishing to get it out and I couldn't see any place where it would have come from.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea253.jpg


Started cleaning up some parts and solved the mystery of the lead screw interlock mentioned before.
This is the dirty picture but the big unit on the end of the feed screw is actually a spring loaded clutch that will disengage the feed screw if there is too much torque applied.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea050.jpg

ldn
07-30-2010, 02:40 AM
That gearbox is a work of art.

What are the pipes for?

Timleech
07-30-2010, 03:44 AM
The QCTP post is mounted in a hole and secured with a setscrew. I removed the setscrew and it does not want to budge.
I haven't gotten to trying any removal tricks yet but if and when it comes out it will be just a post with a larger diameter on the bottom.

I'm thinking of modifying it to fit a BXA Aloris style holder that I have. I also have a friend that threatened to get me a turret.
Toolholders for the DSG OCTP seem a little scarce on this side of the pond.

That's a Dickson toolpost, probably size 3 (S3 or T3).
DSG generally used their own QC post, sometimes on a 4-way turret with one or two QC faces and the other faces plain clamps, which always struck me as a good idea.

Tim

KIMFAB
07-30-2010, 11:17 AM
That gearbox is a work of art.

What are the pipes for?

The pipes route lube oil under pressure to the bearing journals.
There are also holes drilled in the pipes at various spots to spray oil on needed areas like the shifting fork.
At the end of the line it is necked down and sprays oil on a little window so you can check that all is well.

oil mac
07-30-2010, 06:56 PM
Kimfab,
Well done with your really fine lathe, As a machine D.S.G/s are marvellous, where i worked we had one, Glad you found that cover, I like your o/haul, Looking forward to seeing your finished treasure

Elninio
07-31-2010, 11:43 AM
The pipes route lube oil under pressure to the bearing journals.
There are also holes drilled in the pipes at various spots to spray oil on needed areas like the shifting fork.
At the end of the line it is necked down and sprays oil on a little window so you can check that all is well.

Under pressure, are you sure? Well of course there has to be some pressure to have it move, but it is not high pressure, right?

KIMFAB
07-31-2010, 12:44 PM
I haven't had the machine running yet so I dunno about the headstock but turning the gearbox over by hand gives me several 1/16" streams that would give about a 1" arc.

I would guess maybe 10 psi or so. I doubt that I could run a hydraulic cylinder off it. :D

Andrew_D
07-31-2010, 02:44 PM
I have yet to tear into the headstock of my McDougall (20"x48"), but it also has a small oil pump in the headstock that pumps oil to the spindle bearings.

The pressure line even has a "T" in the line that is soldered in with the "T" pointing straight up towards a pipe plug in the top cover. (Maybe there was an option to remove the plug and have oil going elsewhere?) Anything like this on the DSG? (Or any other lathe for that matter?)

Andrew

wierdscience
07-31-2010, 03:34 PM
Glad to see your making progress on the rebuild,how many buckets-o-crud has it produced so far?Last machine I tore down and built was a 36" woodworking planer,the cost of the cleaning supplies equaled the $500 I paid for it:)

KIMFAB
08-01-2010, 12:01 AM
Andrew
Haven't seen any tap offs for pressurized oil.

Weird science
So far I have

Lathe ~$65
transport ~$50
initial clean ~$100
second clean $100
gear $255
oil gun and parts $85
rinse oil and solvents $100
lube oil $200

So I'm into it for about $900 so far. I may end up putting Turcite on the sliding parts.

I should have purchased the one Mcguyver got for 2 grand but It's kept me off the streets and there are 50 less Chinese manhole covers.

Timleech
08-02-2010, 08:16 AM
I haven't had the machine running yet so I dunno about the headstock but turning the gearbox over by hand gives me several 1/16" streams that would give about a 1" arc.

I would guess maybe 10 psi or so. I doubt that I could run a hydraulic cylinder off it. :D

My later DSG 1910 has an adjustable pressure relief valve, which I had to replace (the original is probably in the bottom of the headstock sump!). Got a new one from DSG, which wasn't set to any particular pressure. I asked them what was the recommended pressure, their answer was roughly that so long as oil comes out of all the right places it doesn't really matter. There is a low pressure warning light, but the sender was also broken! I don't think my old 17 x 36 (older than yours) had any sort of pressure control, just a sight glass to show that oil was flowing.

Tim

KIMFAB
08-02-2010, 04:18 PM
Just got the DSG approved oil gun so of course the first thing I did was use it to prime the oil pump in the headstock.
I already had the motor installed and the belts on but was afraid to fire it up without priming the pump.

Well, my advice for the day is DO NOT run the machine with the headstock cover off!
I think my 10 psi estimate was a little low. I saw at least 5 and probably more squirt holes going before I could shut the machine off and it had splashed oil over everything.

The transmission gives out a nice leisurely squirt, squirt but the headstock is nuts. 1/8 " holes that are directed down and sideways and can shoot a steady stream at least 2 feet horizontally.

Now that I know it works I have more inspiration to keep moving.

My worm gear came in also today so hopefully I'll have the apron assembled and installed by the end of the week.

Mcgyver
08-02-2010, 04:23 PM
Well, my advice for the day is DO NOT run the machine with the headstock cover off!.

haha, I'd been sooo tempted to try that when adjusting the clutches....thanks for the heads up, for sure i would have gotten lazy and tried that one day

ldn
08-02-2010, 04:25 PM
I saw at least 5 and probably more squirt holes going before I could shut the machine off and it had splashed oil over everything.


Now THAT would have been worthy of a video! :D

KIMFAB
08-02-2010, 04:33 PM
I may just try a video. I'll need to clean up anyway.
I'll have to figure some way so the camera doesn't get oiled, maybe a plastic box.

KIMFAB
08-03-2010, 11:02 PM
Well here is the video. I set up off to the side and above, worked OK.
I wanted something for documentation anyway. Keep in mind this is without the gears running and splashing.

As the demonstrator for the suicide bomber school said "Watch carefully, I'm only going to do this once"

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathe272.avi

Here is the floor after a quick run

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea278.jpg

Here is the transmission, a little more sedate. (caution large file)

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathe273.avi

Several holes were plugged, had to take the pipe off and clean.

wierdscience
08-03-2010, 11:09 PM
Well that's progess,just need some goggles and a raincoat:D

KIMFAB
08-08-2010, 01:09 AM
Took a bit to clean up. I'll have a lot more cleanup after I'm done.

Now that I know it works I didn't like those belts and gears whipping in the wind. Time for covers.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea301.jpg

Got the replacement gear in so it's time to assemble the apron.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea271.jpg

Finally got the apron back together and ready to mount.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea304.jpg

The green arrow points to the lockout pin. This keeps the feedscrew and the leadscrew drives from engaging simultaneously.

I first thought that there was no interlock, that it was protected by a clutch on the feedscrew but after assembly it's obvious that there is an interlock.
The half nuts were frozen from no lubrication so the leadscrew was effectively locked out, hence the confusion.

The pin is attached to the bottom half nut and when the leadscrew is engaged the pin moves up and interferes with the engagement of the feedscrew gearbox which rocks back and forth to engage. If the gearbox is rocked out and engaged it blocks the pin from moving up.

ldn
08-08-2010, 01:15 AM
Thanks for the video, that must have been quite the surprise when it happened the first time.

I don't have much to say, but I'm enjoying the updates, thanks for posting!

Obviously I'm not the only one, judging from the number of views.

gwilson
08-08-2010, 08:08 AM
I can't get your 1st. video to work.

aboard_epsilon
08-08-2010, 08:49 AM
Here is the transmission, a little more sedate. (caution large file)

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathe273.avi

Several holes were plugged, had to take the pipe off and clean.

Think there is a hell of a lot more oil been squirted out than my smart and brown

this is how smart and brown do it

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-6309627113857313609#

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-4321070136898375471#

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=4359913403223514549#

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-3184711339479215635#

just steady drips


ignore the split belt .

all the best.markj

KIMFAB
08-08-2010, 10:51 AM
I can't get your 1st. video to work.
I checked the link again and it is valid. Does the second link work?
Try opening with a different player.

ldn
08-08-2010, 02:29 PM
I can't get your 1st. video to work.

I have a Mac and it wouldn't play in my browser. But when I downloaded it to my desktop it worked just fine.

becksmachine
08-09-2010, 12:32 AM
Well, my advice for the day is DO NOT run the machine with the headstock cover off!
I think my 10 psi estimate was a little low. I saw at least 5 and probably more squirt holes going before I could shut the machine off and it had splashed oil over everything.


With the assistance of some strategically placed cardboard, I have done this to locate a bad tooth in a Lodge & Shipley headstock. It will show up very obviously under fluorescent lighting.

Dave

KIMFAB
08-09-2010, 11:11 PM
Onward to the control. Took off the front cover. The indicators will have to be replaced. The switches look crude but usable.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea290.jpg


Here are the contacts.These need a cleanup but the lenses in the indicators are either dull, missing, or broken.



The bulb holding method is not too impressive either. Got some replacements on order.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea327.jpg


Finally got the apron on. Took most of the day to hook up all the shafts and levers. Ran it thru the gears and it seems to feed properly.


Now work on the crosslides and control relays can begin.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea324.jpg

Toolguy
08-09-2010, 11:20 PM
Looking good! You will have a great machine when you're done! I know you've been busy with the lathe...but have you noticed that someone has stolen your
Rembrandt painting?

KIMFAB
08-09-2010, 11:27 PM
That is actually a picture of our founder. He is on vacation right now.

KIMFAB
08-16-2010, 11:46 AM
Got the indicators in so it was time to get the electrical set up.

I had the delusion after looking at the relays that I could reconfigure them and reuse them.

Wasted a whole day taking them apart and checking and cleaning them. I couldn't get them to pull up properly, looks like bad coils all around. I'll use solid state relays instead.

Too bad, they are modular relays and can be configured any way you want.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea336.jpg

Hopefully, I'll have better luck with the cross slides.

KIMFAB
08-18-2010, 12:10 AM
Back to the saddle and cross slides. Got the lower cross slide figured out and installed and it's time to take the saddle off again to
install the front gib plates and the saddle lock.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea340.jpg

The left gib plate will install OK but the saddle must be raised for the right gib and the lock. Throw a brace under the apron to hold it
and lift the saddle.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea342.jpg

Back together again. Takes a bit of fishing to get the gib and lock lined up and bolted and then the left gib slides right in.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea345.jpg

Ready for the upper cross slide.

KIMFAB
08-23-2010, 01:02 AM
The unit used to set the angle of the top cross slide was held down with a couple of cobbed up bolts so some new clamp pieces had to be made.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea354.jpg

Here are the sliding clamp pieces along with the cobbed up bolts they are replacing.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea368.jpg

Now that the top cross slide can be installed there is a new problem. toolholders for the original Dickson toolpost are expensive if they can be found.

I decided to use an existing BXA post, however there is a height problem. Even with a holder at its lowest point, the cutter is too high.

This requires a high level management decision. I hate to cut the boss down on the crosslide but that seems to be the only way to make it work.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea362.jpg

KIMFAB
08-23-2010, 01:05 AM
Decided to work on the chuck while I pondered the height problem.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea348.jpg


Chuck came apart easily, not too bad inside.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea352.jpg


More later.

Elninio
08-23-2010, 01:19 AM
How did you remove all the rust from the bed? Just dipping in that bath from the previous pictures - or something else as well?

KIMFAB
08-23-2010, 10:39 AM
How did you remove all the rust from the bed? Just dipping in that bath from the previous pictures - or something else as well?

Same way as the chuck and most of the other critical parts, I very carefully scraped it off with a razor blade.

Once you get the right angle it comes off surprisingly easily.

Greg Menke
08-23-2010, 02:44 PM
Bad form to mill off that boss under the toolpost- would be better to make up a plate to fit over the boss, toolpost bolted thru to hold it all together like a sandwich.

Greg

djc
08-23-2010, 03:24 PM
Bad form to mill off that boss under the toolpost- would be better to make up a plate to fit over the boss, toolpost bolted thru to hold it all together like a sandwich.

How will that solve the problem? The tool will still be too high, but now it will have a nice plate under it.

I don't know the internals of a BXA toolpost, but can you not bore the hole the topslide boss enters deeper? The toolpost body will the sit lower. You might need a thick washer under the clamping lever.

oldbikerdude37
08-23-2010, 04:17 PM
Bad form to mill off that boss under the toolpost- would be better to make up a plate to fit over the boss, toolpost bolted thru to hold it all together like a sandwich.

Greg

Not always, if you look at the picture it looks like its sitting on a big washer.
when we had a compound break we ordered a new compound topslide for a mazak/Hercules Ajax for $1,100.

the first thing we did is mill it down for the new toolpost. Thats what the boss is for, mill it down to make it fit best and be ridged.

Greg Menke
08-23-2010, 05:23 PM
If the boss is intended to be cut away as part of fitting a toolpost then no problem. My intent was to suggest that a permanent mod to the compound might be undesirable since it looks like it was designed for a specific toolpost. OTOH if the intended toolpost is too high up on a spacer- which it looks like in the pic, then I'd definitely cut away the boss before trying to bore out the toolpost. Certainly will be lots easier & cheaper to equip the machine with an Aloris style setup than a Dickson, nice as they are.

But, if you've a an el-cheapo Aloris style toolpost as a possible sacrifice it might be interesting to see how machinable it is, though I suspect relieving it to accept that boss might cut away a lot of the threaded portion of the center column, and perhaps some of the "barrel" which drives the wedges.

Greg

KIMFAB
08-23-2010, 10:50 PM
The BXA tool post that I have is hardened with no room to cut.

Here is a better pic of what we are up against. There seems to be plenty of meat to work on.
There are also a few other holes maybe for different holders?

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea379.jpg

Anyway I got the D1-6 camlock setup cleaned up. It was covered with oil and gunk.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea371.jpg


Back together and the finished chuck is mounted. Now for the top cross slide.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea375.jpg


Still need a better plan for lowering the toolholder.


Next two days are doctor visits for the wife so there is still time for a better plan.

Brucey
08-26-2010, 05:58 AM
Hi there KIMFAB i have been lurking for some time on this site and recently decided to join after reading about your resto.

A friend of mine has a smaller DS&G but his is the tool room lathe.

The Tool post that was originally fitted to the lathe was a large square style indexing unit.

The index register unit (spring) sat in the large hole to the left of the main centre hole.

The main centre hole on his has a brass bush as the toolpost spins / locates in it.

Now to the tricky part mate the register dia on your compound slide casting the tool post sits over it and locks down on the top face of the compound slide.

(stops swarf ever getting under your tool post and upsetting centre height or indexing correctly)

Now to the rub i suspect your lathe lost its original tool holder many years ago in the rush to speed up tool changes but look at the damage that has occured to the casting as it smack's into the chuck.

Please refer to your photo in the last post with the compond set at say 35 deg with your toolpost sitting on the compound, i suspect it will crash out at 1.5 inches from the chuck

What i suggest is to machine the topslide down set a plate in the top (countersunk screws and a bit of bondo)and rebore it for a new centre post say 1.5 or 2.0 inches away from the existing centre towards the chuck.

Thats my suggestion mate, and by the way you are making a beautiful job on the resto mate you will be rewarded with a beautiful machine that can be truly said to sing as it carves metal away all under silky control :D

Good luck mate Bruce :)

KIMFAB
08-27-2010, 07:22 PM
Decided to bite the bullet and go ahead and adapt it over. Also cleaned up the nicks.

I may have to set another post if I run into interference when turning by the chuck or tailstock.
The only commercial use I have for this right now involves boring so it should be OK for a while.



http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea382.jpg


Next turn the post down.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea388.jpg


Painted and set on the trucks back bumper for a nice 110 degree sun baked finish.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea397.jpg


Got a solid state 530 VAC 3 phase relay from my son. I'll use 2 legs of it.
My heat sink was a little light on the backside so I'll use a piece of !/4" aluminum for better heat distribution.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea386.jpg

Deja Vu
08-27-2010, 07:53 PM
I'm having fun watching this thread grow!

4GSR
08-27-2010, 08:25 PM
Kimfab,

NICE job there!!!

Wish my 1954 Lodge & Shipley lathe would go together as nice as your DS&G is going!

Enjoy the thread!

Ken

gwilson
08-27-2010, 11:12 PM
Kimfab,it is much better to not mill with the spindle sticking out that far. It is less rigid,and adds error to any out of tram that the mill may have.

KIMFAB
08-28-2010, 12:26 AM
Sorry if I have offended but with the height extension on my Lagun the knee was at max height.
I was doing this with my chin on the table. :D

I locked everything down and took a light cut at the end.
Luckily it is not that critical, It checks out OK but I was prepared to fire up the surface grinder.

Elninio
08-28-2010, 01:28 AM
why didn't you run it on the surface grinder after milling?

KIMFAB
08-28-2010, 11:36 AM
I had to take care of the wife and this is just a test.
I'll probably have to take it apart and make some changes when I find some interferences with the chuck or tailstock.
I'm still trying to come up with some kind of T-slot solution for mounting the QCTH.

gwilson
08-28-2010, 01:43 PM
No offense,Kimfab. Under the circumstances,looks like you did what you had to. Sounds like a good reason for me to not put a height extension on my mill. I've had an 8" Bridgeport one laying around for some time. It would be no easy job to pop it on and off!

Maybe someone would like to buy it? It has the spyder,but no long bolts.

Peter.
08-28-2010, 01:49 PM
Kimfab,it is much better to not mill with the spindle sticking out that far. It is less rigid,and adds error to any out of tram that the mill may have.

I can't see what you're getting at here. Surely the amount of out-of-tram will no more change from extending the quill than it would from lowering the knee?

Timleech
08-28-2010, 02:16 PM
I can't see what you're getting at here. Surely the amount of out-of-tram will no more change from extending the quill than it would from lowering the knee?

Agreed, the angle remains the same.
Because of the way my mill is constructed I often have to mill with the quill partially extended, it's not the end of the world with a good hefty quill.

Tim

gwilson
08-28-2010, 02:42 PM
Partially rather than nearly completely fully extended is a different matter. It does affect rigidity,but maybe not the tram. It was late last night when I said that. With a raising block,looks like he has to do it,though.

This was discussed at length some months ago.

KIMFAB
09-01-2010, 11:46 PM
Finished cleaning and assembly of the top crosslide.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea399.jpg


QCTP mounted with tools.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea411.jpg


The first cut. Still a lot of adjustments and fiddling to go but it cuts nice and smooth.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea422.jpg

KiddZimaHater
09-02-2010, 01:15 AM
Kimfab,
Sheesh, all of that beautiful restoration work, and you slap an ugly coupling nut on top of your Q.C. Toolpost.
FOR SHAME!! :p

photomankc
09-02-2010, 03:41 PM
I'm in complete awe! To haul that thing out of a scrap yard and watch it come back to life. That thing could probably chuck up my lathe! Well, nor really but oh how I would love to have something that steady and massive and an outdoor shop to put it in. Keep the updates coming, this is fascinating to watch.

KIMFAB
09-02-2010, 07:01 PM
Kimfab,
Sheesh, all of that beautiful restoration work, and you slap an ugly coupling nut on top of your Q.C. Toolpost.
FOR SHAME!! :p

Look carefully at the handle of the large handwheel in the second to the last picture to be really appalled.

These things will be taken care of. Still have a long way to go.
I may keep the coupling nut as it is tho. It gives the machine character.

KIMFAB
09-04-2010, 09:53 PM
Next up is the tailstock.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea432.jpg


The center adjustment opened up . A lot of surface rust but no pits.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea433.jpg


Scraping off the old paint.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea436.jpg


Painted and set in the oven to bake.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea442.jpg

More sparkling commentary to come in later posts.

Elninio
09-04-2010, 10:55 PM
Next up is the tailstock.
Painted and set in the oven to bake.
More sparkling commentary to come in later posts.
what oven?

Elninio
09-05-2010, 01:09 AM
Will you be adjusting the spindle and spindle bore with a TPG?

KIMFAB
09-05-2010, 02:33 PM
what oven?

It is 104 in the shade by the pool. the temp of the tailstock using my handy-dandy infared reader is already 133 deg F

I'm quite confident that by 3 PM when it is 112 our tailstock will be at least 150.

Your oven is right here, I sit in the middle of it, and now late in the year, it's only set to warm.



Will you be adjusting the spindle and spindle bore with a TPG?

I'm not sure what you are after. I'll be checking the spindle closer later but hair splitting adjustments, if any, will have to wait till the cash jobs are done.
If you are talking about the chuck runout, yeah the three jaw is out over .010" The four jaw looks reasonable so far.

KIMFAB
09-09-2010, 12:44 PM
After many days spent at various medical facilities it looks like the wife's liver is cancer free and her lymph nodes are almost normal.

Another month of this chemo madness and hopefully we'll be able to party down again.

Mcgyver
09-09-2010, 12:51 PM
thats great news! what a relief


Elninio, can you please edit out the photolinks in your quotes? there's no need to repeat all the pictures and it makes the tread a pita to read. thanks

Elninio
09-09-2010, 03:18 PM
thats great news! what a relief


Elninio, can you please edit out the photolinks in your quotes? there's no need to repeat all the pictures and it makes the tread a pita to read. thanks

Can I PM you about the smart & brown lathe?

Mcgyver
09-09-2010, 04:34 PM
of course - thanks for editing that, was a pita to scroll through

KIMFAB
09-11-2010, 07:25 PM
Starting to clean the mating surfaces. I scraped the rust off with a razor blade and then a light touch with a Cratex.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea476.jpg


The top and bottom mated on the lathe. Main hold down and screw installed.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea522.jpg


Indicating in the tailstock. Got it good front to back but it is about .006" low.



http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea526.jpg


Ready to go. Now I need a #3 Morse center and perhaps a drill chuck or two.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea531.jpg

Will try to get to the electrics next.

Toolguy
09-11-2010, 08:19 PM
Great job KIMFAB! Thanks for letting us ride along!:)

KIMFAB
09-14-2010, 12:16 AM
Finally got the lathe's main components in place and operational. Now for some prettiness. Clean up the mess first.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea533.jpg


Laid out the main electrical components. I got replacement LED's that fit right into the old light locations. Cleaned the contacts on the push switches.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea541.jpg


Mounted diodes on the transformer and assembled the heat sink, buffer plate, and solid state relay.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea544.jpg


Wired together on the bench. Seems to work fine. Found a nice little DPDT relay with a DIN mount that fits nicely on the heat sink.


I used the classic 'momentary on, lock up to ground with momentary release' configuration for the circuit.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea554.jpg

hornluv
09-14-2010, 05:14 PM
Great job on the lathe. With regard to the tailstock alignment, are you sure it's that low or is indicator sag a possibility? It's really pretty amazing how much gravity affects an indicator.

KIMFAB
09-14-2010, 08:32 PM
Found some nice heavy cable to replace the old wiring to the control and pulled it in.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea556.jpg


Got the faceplate wired and ready to install.



http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea564.jpg


Other end of cable including the solid state relay and transformer. Now all I have to do is put this end in an enclosure.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea572.jpg


Faceplate installed in machine. Lights and pushbuttons work. Now I can start it from the front panel.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea566.jpg


After running for 10 minutes and a dozen starts and stops there is no noticeable heat from the heat sink.

KIMFAB
09-23-2010, 06:11 PM
Got a box for the control equipment. Put in some vents for cooling.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea574.jpg


Everything fits nice.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea578.jpg


Mounted up.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea580.jpg


The main relay died after some more testing. Oh well, it was a free non-working sample. Ordered up the right unit.


Now I have to replace the wipers. It looks like they are made of some kind of rubberized fabric. Don't know if that is the stock equipment or if felt would do.
I do know the DSG people are very proud of their wipers, seems it was like $150 for the set.

Timleech
09-23-2010, 06:22 PM
Now I have to replace the wipers. It looks like they are made of some kind of rubberized fabric. Don't know if that is the stock equipment or if felt would do.
I do know the DSG people are very proud of their wipers, seems it was like $150 for the set.


I think a set of wipers for a 10EE is about the same ;)

Probably no help to you, but I got a metre length of wiper from them for my DSG 1910, to cut to size myself, but that's a more or less flat bed lathe so straightforward. It's a red plastic squeegee section in a stainless steel mounting. Drilling it for the mounting screws was the only awkward bit. I got enough to do the main wipers on my mill with the same stuff.


Tim

Mcgyver
09-23-2010, 06:33 PM
Now I have to replace the wipers. It looks like they are made of some kind of rubberized fabric. Don't know if that is the stock equipment or if felt would do.
I do know the DSG people are very proud of their wipers, seems it was like $150 for the set.

they're something aren't they - any idea what the factory wipers are made of? Mine has thickish (around .100" iirc) white pieces of plastic...nothing special, just plastic cut to fit the ways. I doubt its factory but haven't bothered to change it out because of the cost....I suppose plastic is not ideal, will embed grit etc. Tim what's the plastic you have - a squeegee section? as in it comes to a edge where it contacts the way?

wierdscience
09-23-2010, 10:54 PM
I got a block of heavy felt from McMaster to make wipers from.Cuts easy with a sharp bandsaw blade running at wood speed.
Scrapers I have made from 2-litre bottle plastic.They worked,but the wipers still need to be pulled and washed every so often.

Dr Stan
09-23-2010, 11:04 PM
Noticed the art work on the wall, Dogs Playing Poker. I have the same print in my shop and bought it just to annoy my wife the artist. :D

rdfeil
09-23-2010, 11:27 PM
Kimfab,

+1 on Wierdsciences suggestion. On my LeBlond I made the wipers out of 1/4 inch white felt backed by 1/4 inch black rubber. My lathe has steel wiper covers so the fit was not real critical, just cut them close and tightened the covers to push them out a little. McMaster Carr has all of the above materials for reasonable prices. The only trouble is the stuff is sold in 12" X 12" minimum sizes. Oh Well, I have enough for many more parts :D

Robin

duckman
09-23-2010, 11:34 PM
You are doing a fantastic job. The one of many things that I've learned over the years is that most people just sweep the tail stock spindle in one place and call it good, the proper way is to let a little bit of spindle stick out and sweep it, then either shorten your indicator rod and extend the spindle and resweep the spindle then you know if the spindle is parallel to the ways. Lets say on your first sweep it showed .003 low and then you extend the spindle sweep again and it shows .005 then you know that the spindle is going down hill. :D

KIMFAB
09-23-2010, 11:58 PM
Noticed the art work on the wall, Dogs Playing Poker. I have the same print in my shop and bought it just to annoy my wife the artist. :D

Actually it's cats playing poker but it is in my shop because the wife doesn't like mine either. What's with women? No sense of true art.

Mcgyver
09-24-2010, 12:06 AM
you guys have to go and spend money on physical things to annoy your wives? An astounding lack of creatively from such astute craftsmen. I'm quite able to do so regularly, seemingly at will, without props or expense.

wierdscience
09-24-2010, 12:10 AM
you guys have to go and spend money on physical things to annoy your wives? An astounding lack of creatively from such astute craftsmen. I'm quite able to do so regularly, seemingly at will, without props or expense.

Groucho Marx-I'm 42 around the chest, 52 around the waist, 92 around the golf course and a nuisance around the house.

Timleech
10-01-2010, 07:17 AM
they're something aren't they - any idea what the factory wipers are made of? Mine has thickish (around .100" iirc) white pieces of plastic...nothing special, just plastic cut to fit the ways. I doubt its factory but haven't bothered to change it out because of the cost....I suppose plastic is not ideal, will embed grit etc. Tim what's the plastic you have - a squeegee section? as in it comes to a edge where it contacts the way?

This is the stuff, as supplied by DSG for my '1910' lathe

http://i559.photobucket.com/albums/ss38/Timleech_2009/mersey2010/P1000644.jpg

The stainless housing is a bit of a pig to drill, mainly because getting hold of the thing securely isn't straightforward.

Tim

KIMFAB
10-09-2010, 08:45 AM
Tim
Thanks, I was thinking of trying to find some of the wiper stock shown but decided to cop out and use felt.

Anyway, finally got back to work. The relay came in and I got some #1 white felt that I'm going to try for the wipers.
Pics to follow.

KIMFAB
10-10-2010, 12:40 AM
While I'm waiting for stuff I started retapping and cleaning up the leveling screws.



http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea589.jpg


Mounted up a chunk of walnut for a new knob.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea595.jpg


There, a nice walnut knob to replace whatever it was that was there. That's it on the white cardboard.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea597.jpg

KIMFAB
10-10-2010, 12:41 AM
Painted up the followers and got some #1 white felt for wipers.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea608.jpg


Cut the wipers and soaked them in oil before installation.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea619.jpg


All mounted up and ready to go.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea620.jpg

KIMFAB
11-25-2010, 09:01 PM
Now that the lathe is basically ready it's time to slide it up next to the wall.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea626.jpg

Because the level adjustment would be inaccessible I needed to install adjustment ports in the shop.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea637.jpg

The ports are covered with a weatherstripped panel on the outside.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea648.jpg

KIMFAB
11-25-2010, 09:04 PM
Finally in place. The shop is much bigger now.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea644.jpg


I added a metal backplate and a shelf. The adjustment screws were set on 4 X 4 X 3/4" pads.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea672.jpg


A view from the top. I still have to make a transmission shift knob, the broken piece on the crosslide and redo the headstock cover.


There is a number of other things necessary but they can be done after the cash jobs and with the machine in place.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea682.jpg


Now we're ready go with the area decent and the makings of the annual invitational Thanksgiving poker party in place.


http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/DSG/lathea686.jpg
Probably won't have time to do much till after the holidays.

Meanwhile happy Thanksgiving and thanks for watching and advising.

A.K. Boomer
11-25-2010, 09:39 PM
WOW what a lathe, A classic built to the gills, nice little party room too...:)

nickphill
06-24-2015, 01:40 PM
Hi Kimfab, I have just got a type 17T. It is in pretty good condition. I can post more photos but I am stuck as to the change wheels. The manual says the standard setup should be
60teeth - Head (presumably headstock)
75 inter (presumably intermediate)
75 top stud
In the picture enclosed the shaft with no gears on is the feedscrew. If I engage the drive and turn the chuck I can't get anything to turn in the change wheels. I haven't got power to it yet.

Any ideas which is which. I have a feeling it is set up as standard but need to check. The gears need to align better too ?.
https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/352/18501310323_faaca87efa_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/ubU3Z2)IMG_6256 (https://flic.kr/p/ubU3Z2) by capnahabnick (https://www.flickr.com/photos/eldooderino/), on Flickr

and a video

https://youtu.be/MKGML0Cv3s0

Axkiker
06-24-2015, 10:31 PM
May have already been said but its very fortunate it sat out in NV. If that were KY it would not have been in nearly as good of shape.

Very nice.

boslab
06-25-2015, 01:43 AM
See johns post bought meself new lathe, the manglers could be replaced with belt.
Mark