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DaveC
07-08-2010, 05:12 AM
Hi, not sure if this has been asked before, but I was looking into getting a knurling tool...

But, before I do, is there any other methods for getting / cutting a textured finish for grip..... I am only doing small bits but would prefer a more 'cut' finish....

Dave

MuellerNick
07-08-2010, 05:27 AM
There are cutting knurl wheels and forming knurl wheels.
The cutting ones do cut. ;)


Nick

Davidhcnc
07-08-2010, 07:30 AM
A bad picture, I know, you may be able to drill half holes arround the periphery and this makes nice knob grips.

In this application knurling just is no good.

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/david.hull35/WatchImages/speedmaster%20002.jpg

SGW
07-08-2010, 10:12 AM
I've done the equivalent of straight knurling by indexing the part and planing out each line individually.

Measure the o.d. of the part, figure the circumference, and decide how many lines/inch you want. Then figure out how many lines total that is, and that's the number of divisions you need to index. Since that seldom will come out to anything convenient, I generally "adjust" a bit to get something easy to work with. For example, if it comes out to 117 divisions, I'd probably do 120.

As far as cutting the lines, I planed them out with a homemade V cutter held in the spindle and moved with the quill hand feed.

Ken_Shea
07-08-2010, 10:34 AM
There are cutting knurl wheels and forming knurl wheels.
The cutting ones do cut. ;)


Nick

Hmmm. had never heard of or seen them before, in looking them up it seems they are not widely used in the US market but common in the rest of the world.


Pricey little buggers they are!
http://www.accu-trak.com/holders_cuttype.html

dp
07-08-2010, 10:50 AM
There was a three-part series in the HSM magazine recently that showed how to make your own. The article was written by a BBS member, btw. I bought a back issue so I could have all three parts! It's a very well done article and the project requires nothing unusual for tools and skill.

MuellerNick
07-08-2010, 10:52 AM
Shall we start a discussion about the right diameter for knurling? :D


Nick

Ken_Shea
07-08-2010, 10:55 AM
Shall we start a discussion about the right diameter for knurling? :D


Nick

Hmmmm, never read or seen anything on that before :D

Bill Pace
07-08-2010, 11:56 AM
three-part series in the HSM magazine

The "Cut Knurling Tool" is actually a four part series! (it better be only one more issue Mike!) I was really disappointed. I dislike 2 part series, much less 4...

Actually it would really be better to have the entire article in front of you when you start, as a couple steps are shown in earlier parts that were better off left til later.

It is a good article, and looks to make a very neat tool when finished.

Paul Alciatore
07-08-2010, 11:58 AM
Shall we start a discussion about the right diameter for knurling? :D


Nick


Oh, please, please, PLEASE not that again.

If anybody is curious, please use the search to read the existing threads. It really has ALL been said, many times.

Black_Moons
07-08-2010, 11:59 AM
Ebay has the scissor style knurling tools for $45 for buy it now.. And one currently bid to $5..

Paul Alciatore
07-08-2010, 12:21 PM
As for the original question, yes there are alternatives.

Knurling is to provide a better grip. There are other ways of providing a grip. One that I like is using O rings. You simply turn an area that will allow a bunch of O rings to fit side by side and fill it up with them. It provides an excellent grip and looks very nice. Make the width a bit short so there's no gaps and make the OD a bit large so they are tight.

A knurl can be cut. Turn the groves on the diameter and use an indexing set-up in the lathe or mill to do the longitudal ones. You can usually use the same Vee shaped tool so they are alike.

For rough work where appearance is not that important, you can use a thread restoring file to product servicable knurl-like groves for a better grip. I did this on the handwheel on my collet closer. It is about 2.5" or 3" in diameter and originally had a smooth surface so it slipped in my oily hands. I used a thread restoring file to make a number of areas where there were grooves for a better grip. I roughly spaced them around the OD with some space between them so I didn't have to worry about coming out even. It was easy to make them follow the curved surface of the wheel with hand filing: this would have been very difficult with a knurling tool. The result looked OK and provides a good grip for oily hands. Thread restoring files have a number of different spacings so you can choose either fine or coarse or anything between. I haven't tried it, but you could criss cross them for a diamond pattern. And it is quick.

Other types of surfaces could be created. You could use a drill and an indexing device to make a bunch of dimples. Offset the rows (rings) and you will get a very nice pattern. You can vary the spacing (overlapped holes vs. some space between them) for different effects. But it will take a long time.

I'm sure there are other ways.

J. Randall
07-09-2010, 12:48 AM
Assuming your lathe has a reversible leadscrew, and threading capability, set a fairly coarse TPI and thread both a right and left hand thread on the same area where you want the grip.
James

torchroadster
07-09-2010, 06:36 AM
. There are other ways of providing a grip. One that I like is using O rings. You simply turn an area that will allow a bunch of O rings to fit side by side and fill it up with them. It provides an excellent grip and looks very nice. Make the width a bit short so there's no gaps and make the OD a bit large so they are tight.


Or like this:

http://i150.photobucket.com/albums/s120/torchroadster/th_DSC04851.jpg (http://s150.photobucket.com/albums/s120/torchroadster/?action=view&current=DSC04851.jpg)

George Bulliss
07-09-2010, 08:07 AM
The "Cut Knurling Tool" is actually a four part series! (it better be only one more issue Mike!) I was really disappointed. I dislike 2 part series, much less 4...

Actually it would really be better to have the entire article in front of you when you start, as a couple steps are shown in earlier parts that were better off left til later.

It is a good article, and looks to make a very neat tool when finished.

Well Bill, it looks like you will be disappointed again. The project will actually run in five parts. But donít blame Mike for it; Iím the guy that does the chopping.

We try to keep the big project articles about ten pages long or less. If they get much larger than this (1/4 of the magazine) we loose too much variety in the magazine and my phone starts ringing.

Iím getting ready to pass part four to the artist right now. It covers the construction of the gears and contains plenty of information that will help out with other projects as well. Part five will discuss the use of the tool.

George

gwilson
07-09-2010, 09:06 AM
Those cut knurl devices cost several hundred dollars,like over $700.00. They will cut real clean,very sharp diamond knurls,though. I like to use antique micrometer type knurls,etc..I make some by running blank knurl wheels against rotating taps in the lathe. They come out beautiful,and really sharp.

I have also made straight line knurls over curved edges of antique style wooden plane blade cap knobs by using gunsmith's checkering files. You have to be able to file VERY accurately,though.

Your Old Dog
07-09-2010, 09:12 AM
Shall we start a discussion about the right diameter for knurling? :D


Nick

Why not? It's been hours since the last such discussion :D

Deja Vu
07-09-2010, 09:12 AM
Those cut knurl devices cost several hundred dollars,like over $700.00. They will cut real clean,very sharp diamond knurls,though. I like to use antique micrometer type knurls,etc..I make some by running blank knurl wheels against rotating taps in the lathe. They come out beautiful,and really sharp.
This is interesting......
Could you expand on the explanation of this procedure? Is there a "threading feed" involved as the rotating tap cuts the wheel? Do you have a picture of the results?

Ken_Shea
07-09-2010, 09:51 AM
Assuming your lathe has a reversible leadscrew, and threading capability, set a fairly coarse TPI and thread both a right and left hand thread on the same area where you want the grip.
James

James. I like that idea, now to remember it!