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brian Rupnow
07-13-2010, 08:47 AM
I just learned something great on another forum. When typing on a conventional keyboard, hold down the "alt " key and type 248 and it will type the degree sign, as in ---Brian

Carld
07-13-2010, 08:54 AM
It didn't work on my keyboard but then my keyboard is maybe 20 years old.

Weston Bye
07-13-2010, 08:57 AM
You need to use the numeric keypad with Num Lock on when doing this, rather than the 1 through 0 keys across the top of the QWERTY.

Other codes give other characters. Do some experiments.

mochinist
07-13-2010, 09:07 AM
some more

http://www.asciitable.com/extend.gif

aboard_epsilon
07-13-2010, 09:11 AM
works in notepad..but not here


unless i copy from notepad .,..like so

HERE..what happens is
i press alt ..I press 2 ...i press 4 ...then the reply box disappears ..lol

could do with an extension to the smileys here with different symbols

like diameter ... WHICH IS alt plus 0248
upper is alt plus 0216

all the best.markj

Bob Ford
07-13-2010, 09:16 AM
Try Alt 0176 72

Bob

Liger Zero
07-13-2010, 09:20 AM
You can also use Character Map, it is a program included with Windows.

" are you kidding me?! China can make it for !!"

PTSideshow
07-13-2010, 09:22 AM
Go to Programs then accessories then system tools then look for character map. Click on that it will give a graphic layout of all the characters available with each font that you have on your computer. With windows you can point and click, or type in the numbers.
alt+0169
alt+0188
alt+0189
alt+0190
alt+0153
alt+0174
alt+0178
alt+0179

They will change their look and what comes up with each font. There is a full range of arrow heads, clubs, spades, diamonds and hearts. printing notations, and scientific notations along with a selection of ding bats.
:D

MuellerNick
07-13-2010, 09:42 AM
What!?
is on my keyboard in the upper left corner, same key as ^ but with shift.
The is alt-gr + O(h).
The is alt-gr + m
The is alt-gr 2
is alt-gr 3

But then, I have a teutonic keyyboarrrd, Jawohl! :D


Nick

Carld
07-13-2010, 10:55 AM
30 ok, the num lock and 0176 worked. 1.000 and that worked too.

and the character map worked too. Well, something new everyday, now if I can just remember it. A little posty may help until it is permanently etched into my mind.

Thanks, I have been wanting this for years.

rockrat
07-13-2010, 11:10 AM
some more



Some symbols in that gif are not showing as they would on my machine. That looks like ascii codes for quick basic or some other programming language.

Also I was always instructed to add the leading zero. Some machines didnt need it and ignored it and some machines did need it.

ALT 0181 =
ALT 0177 =
ALT 0153 =
ALT 0169 =

I have a listing around here somewhere for almost all of the standard windows ascii characters.
edit - here it is - Click for larger photo.
http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y128/katiecat222/temp/th_ScreenHunter_02Jul131114.jpg (http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y128/katiecat222/temp/ScreenHunter_02Jul131114.jpg)
rock~

dp
07-13-2010, 11:11 AM
On my Mac laptop I press option zero ().

MTNGUN
07-13-2010, 11:49 AM
Doesn't work in linux. I think linux may have its own set of keystroke codes ?

Black Forest
07-13-2010, 12:24 PM
A German keyboard has the sign on the top left key right beside the number 1 key.

Ron of Va
07-13-2010, 03:21 PM
Alt + 167 = (degree)
Alt + 246= (divided by)
Alt+ 1 = ☺ (that is supposed to be a small smiley face)
Alt + 227 = π (pi)

That was all I knew until today. :)

MuellerNick
07-13-2010, 03:33 PM
Alt + 167 = (degree)

This aint degree. Degree is .
is the "ordmaskuline", a number sign for male enumerations. It is used together with N -> "№". Or 1, 2, 3 etc. "№" stands for "numero"
Some countries use the "#" therefore.

would be the ordfeminine. 1, 2, 3 etc.



Nick

RKW
07-13-2010, 03:40 PM
That is nice! When did M$ slip this into the OS?


I just learned something great on another forum. When typing on a conventional keyboard, hold down the "alt " key and type 248 and it will type the degree sign, as in ---Brian

oldbikerdude37
07-13-2010, 03:44 PM
That is nice! When did M$ slip this into the OS?

A long time ago but I did not know you need the num locks/alt and use the num pad, I found out 2 months ago.

dp
07-13-2010, 03:53 PM
That is nice! When did M$ slip this into the OS?

It has been there since MSDOS 1.0.

old-biker-uk
07-13-2010, 04:07 PM
Ahh.. but we seem to have lost the onboard macro that wrote fractions (13/16" or 29/64" etc...) like on earlier MS software (or may be it was Wordperfect regrettably no longer with us).
At least I can't find a way to do it........Any offers?
Mark

MuellerNick
07-13-2010, 04:19 PM
At least I can't find a way to do it........Any offers?

Buy the Unicode-book and see if you can find it. :D

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unicode Unicode has 107000 different characters ...


Nick

RKW
07-13-2010, 04:33 PM
I'm not sure how many special symbols I need/use other than the one Brian cited () but there may be a few here and there. In AutoCAD I always used their own special symbol format for text (%%d, IIRC). I was aware of holding <Control> and typing various letters or symbols but the <Alt> number pad is completely new to me. Funny, since I have been using and building PCs since 1986. I wonder how many other undocumented features are to be had?

Evan
07-13-2010, 06:38 PM
That is nice! When did M$ slip this into the OS?


Back about DOS 2.0 or so.

Here is a nice little free application that put a very small onscreen keyboard up that has a bunch of special language characters and also has eight spots that you can customize with whatever you want. It does not require installing, it contains no spyware, nags or malware, and the site has been passed by Norton and Macafee as clean.

It's only 44k download but it requires the .net framework.

http://www.softsea.com/review/Extended-Character-Keyboard.html

tyrone shewlaces
07-13-2010, 07:25 PM
Doesn't work in linux. I think linux may have its own set of keystroke codes ?

In Linux, it's <ctrl>+<shift>+<u>
this "types" an underlined u (which I guess stands for "unicode"). Anyway, you then release those keys so you're free to type the number of unicode you want, then <enter>.

Sounds like a drawn out hassle, but it's pretty easy once you get used to it.

⌀⌘⎒⍔
All kinds of goofy symbols you can type.
http://www.unicode.org/charts/#symbols

RussZHC
07-13-2010, 09:48 PM
Some issues I never took the time to sort out include the "flakiness" that some details of Open Office include having an item labeled "c", if contained in ( ) automatically turn to the copyright symbol...still trying to decide on a really good "-" (minus/subtract) symbol as to my eyes the keystroke is a bit too small and a bit "light" but that could be more my eyes...I always found Times New Roman apostrophes and single quote marks difficult to see when those the same size as the text.

oldtiffie
07-13-2010, 11:02 PM
Its all there at:

C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Start Menu\Programs\Accessories\System Tools

The degree character is the centre characterin the 6th. row.

Others include: @ ⅓ ⅔ ⅛ ⅜ ⅝ ⅞ Ω π etc.

gwilson
07-13-2010, 11:39 PM
Pressing option and them 0 WORKS!!!! on my Mac. Thank you!!!!:)