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EddyCurr
07-13-2010, 08:19 PM
Has anyone else seen episodes of Ultimate Factories broadcast on SPEEDTV?

I have long despaired of finding watchable programming anymore on this network.
However, I will acknowledge that the show last week about Harley Davidson's
V-Rod production line and this week's show about the Z/06 Corvette were
quite interesting.

If you haven't seen the episodes, imagine how Discovery or History Channel
would approach these subjects and you'll have a good sense of what you
missed.

It was particularly interesting to see how the mandrel bends of the V-Rod's
highly visible exoskeletal frame are post-processed with hydroforming to
smooth the kinks. The routine that employees must go through to gain
access to the Corvette paint area came as news to me, too.

.

EddyCurr
07-13-2010, 08:24 PM
If you haven't seen the episodes, imagine how Discovery or History Channel
would approach these subjects and you'll have a good sense of what you
missed.Ahhh, turns out the series has been around for a while and was produced by
National Geographic


Ultimate Factories (http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/series/ultimate-factories/all/Overview)

Looks there is quite a lineup already in the can


Apache Helicopter
Audi
BMW
Camaro
Caterpillar
Corvette
Ferrari
Fire Trucks
Harley-Davidson
IKEA
John Deere
Lamborghini

.

Bill736
07-13-2010, 09:09 PM
It's also my opinion that there's not much on television worth watching.
I watch Pawn Stars, American Pickers, drag racing, boxing, and reruns of Cheers. I record all those shows on a DVR ( digital hard disk recorder) and watch them later as time permits. Also, "Have Gun Will Travel" with Richard Boone , seasons 1 through 4, have now been issued on DVD, and the Western Channel is showing some season 4 episodes. I've become a bit irritated with shows on the History Channel and Discovery which pretend to be technical in nature, showing how things are manufactured, but in fact are full of mistakes; I find that when they interview experts, the facts are accurate. But much of the narration is from a non-expert trying to fill in the time slot, and some wildly inaccurate statements are made. I don't know where they get that information; perhaps from the night janitor. ( The same guy who designed the plastic jewel cases for CD disks.) I have not seen any of the above mentioned Ultimate Factory shows, but I'll try watching some.

lynnl
07-13-2010, 10:05 PM
I switched to DirecTv about a year and a half ago, so don't know what the cable offerings are nowadays. But I can find TOO DAMN MUCH of great interest now. Pretty much any topic of interest, there seems to be a dedicated channel for it: Horse racing, golf, tennis, home fixit, gardening, and on and on.

In addition to Ultimate Factories, there are about a half dozen similar programs: "How It's Made", "Factory Made", "How do They Do That", and 3 or 4 others that I can't recall the title right now. Depending on the topics they're covering (usually 3 per episode) there's very often some machining or machining/metal related activities (casting/forging/etc.) portrayed, and often it's pretty detailed. Nothing like those imbecilic motorcycle programs, where dad is ranting and raving because timelines are tight.

There's another one or three dealing with construction: "Build It Bigger" is the one I can recall. It's aimed more at the "Gee Whiz" audience, but it does present some very interesting technical aspects as well.

I have my DVR set up to record all of those series, along with various series on Military Channel (World at War) , History Ch., Science Ch., etc., so I can almost literally watch that stuff all day long if so desired.

A lot is repeat, but one click of the Delete button fixes that.

Yeah, I'll have to agree with Bill about some of the narrators. But I can kind of sort thru the mistakes, e.g. when they proclaim, in an awestruck voice, "This (gizmo) is stamped out of solid 1/2" steel with a force of 1200 pounds!" l

ADGO_Racing
07-13-2010, 10:44 PM
I've become a bit irritated with shows on the History Channel and Discovery which pretend to be technical in nature, showing how things are manufactured, but in fact are full of mistakes; I find that when they interview experts, the facts are accurate. But much of the narration is from a non-expert trying to fill in the time slot, and some wildly inaccurate statements are made. I don't know where they get that information; perhaps from the night janitor. ( The same guy who designed the plastic jewel cases for CD disks.)


This fits very well with a book I am currently reading (Shop Class as Soulcraft An Inquiry into the Value of Work by Matthew Crawford). It is an eye opener as to how we got to where we are today. It is far more involved than just the bottom line of any corporations spread sheets. It is a small book, but very well done. In my opinion, it is well worth reading.

EddyCurr
07-13-2010, 11:01 PM
When you are finished with 'Shop Craft', pick up Robert M. Pirsig's 'Zen
and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance'.

As I read 'Shop Craft' I couldn't help being annoyed at how Mr. Crawford's
anecdotes repeatedly seemed to suggest that he learned eveything he
came to know the hard way - ie: by breaking stuff, often at other people's
expense.

.

ADGO_Racing
07-14-2010, 12:56 AM
I am only about a quarter of the way through it now. I did see reference to the book you are discussing.

It seems that we both and probably a good number of us on this forum, had proper training, and guidance in our younger years. We didn't make as many mistakes on others dime. To this day, when I make a mistake, it is on me, I never pass along the costs to a customer. It would unfortunately seem that Mr. Crawford didn't have that influence earlier in life.

Thanks for the heads up, i will put Mr. Pirsig's 'Zen
and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance'. on the list of things to read.