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BigBoy1
08-13-2010, 06:29 PM
I was reading a book about railway artillery and I was totally taken aback by their capabilities - a 7 ton shell with a range of 30 miles and the sizes of the guns. The largest railway gun in the book was a WWII German gun with a barrel which had a bore of 800mm (31.5") and a length of 32.48 meters (106.5 feet). It was made by the Krupp Company. In order to make such a barrel, it must have been some tremendously large lathe used to turn and rifle the barrel. Also, trying to hold tight tolerances on a piece so large must have been a nightmare. Also, this gun was built about 70 years ago, long before any CNC stuff!

Does anyone have a pictures or links to sites which might show the large machine tools used to make these large artillery pieces? Thanks.

.RC.
08-13-2010, 07:00 PM
leblond made the deep hole borers that the US used to make their 16" naval cannons...

They are fairly big.. But big is easy to build, small is much harder then big...

KiddZimaHater
08-13-2010, 07:57 PM
Check out this link for the story:
Story of the GUSTAV (http://rapidttp.co.za/milhist/vol124lw.html)

Rustybolt
08-13-2010, 10:19 PM
I was reading a book about railway artillery and I was totally taken aback by their capabilities - a 7 ton shell with a range of 30 miles and the sizes of the guns. The largest railway gun in the book was a WWII German gun with a barrel which had a bore of 800mm (31.5") and a length of 32.48 meters (106.5 feet). It was made by the Krupp Company. In order to make such a barrel, it must have been some tremendously large lathe used to turn and rifle the barrel. Also, trying to hold tight tolerances on a piece so large must have been a nightmare. Also, this gun was built about 70 years ago, long before any CNC stuff!

Does anyone have a pictures or links to sites which might show the large machine tools used to make these large artillery pieces? Thanks.



das Paris Kanon.


Built solely to besiege Paris in WW1.
metalurgy at the time was such that every time the gun was fired the bore streatched. The shells were numbered so that a slightly larger shell was loaded each time. After a number of shells the barrel was lowered and a new barrel was installed and the process began again.
it required a couple of hundred soldiers to attend it and it was wildly inaccurate.
Not one of herr Krupps better ideas.

Robin R
08-13-2010, 10:55 PM
Not a machine tool, but a big machine made by krupp. http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/machinery-photos/big-earth-mover-111324/

Duffy
08-13-2010, 11:47 PM
The WW2 gun you referred to was primarily used to reduce Sebastepol, on the Eastern front, and Warsaw. There were two, I think, and they were spectacular failures. Each weapon required something like 1500 support staff, and they did not have a very long range. They took literally weeks to assemble and range in. As far as precision of construction, they did have the advantage of being shell guns; thus the gas seal in the breech was the casing. Allied guns, on the other hand, (big ones,) relied on a pretty precise fit of the breech block and an obduration pad for sealing.
FWIW, the largest calibre gun prize goes to the US Army. It was a smooth bore muzzle loader, (I guess it qualified as a mortar,) named Little David-36" bore! Never saw action, the same as the 44,000 lb bomb. It stands outside the entrance to the museum at Aberdeen Md.
For a WORKING railroad gun, but a measily single track unit, the prize goes to "Anzio Annie." It was one of several 25 cm guns. They used a specially designed projectile with splines which engaged the rifling. As a result it only had a small copper gas check ring. The reduced friction permitted it to gain many miles of range over a conventional design.

gary350
08-14-2010, 12:48 AM
Check this one out. I want one of these in my back yard to play with. If you want to see this gun it is in a Muesum in Maryland.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nAxySDG_jjs

This is the one your talking about. It took 1300 men 15 minutes to load and shoot.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3oLC9XtnVJI&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fyFKbLGGCVY&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fyFKbLGGCVY&feature=related

The Germans are some amazing engineers.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DEMvyM_ZBC4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2JJFQ0kfanQ&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ULNDQd809ag&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a5a69PQ88KQ&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWQh80o2V-4&feature=related

Evan
08-14-2010, 02:01 AM
It's pretty hard to beat the US M-65, towed or flat car mounted.

http://ixian.ca/pics7/m65.jpg

KiddZimaHater
08-14-2010, 02:53 AM
I like that picture Evan.
I read about the first (and only?) artillery fired, atomic shell.
Crazy.

Evan
08-14-2010, 03:12 AM
The US and presumably the USSR spent a lot of time and money exploring the concept of theatre atomic weapons and tactical weapons. They developed weapons small enough to be delivered by just about any existing chemical explosive delivery system including mortars.

What they either didn't appreciate of just didn't care about is that once you escalate to using nukes there isn't any incentive to keep using only small ones. The size of the railway guns is proof of that.

jugs
08-14-2010, 04:37 AM
Start here > http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/antique-machinery-history/armstrong-whitworth-lathes-gun-barrels-168975/

Look @ posts - 42, 51, 53, http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/antique-machinery-history/armstrong-whitworth-lathes-gun-barrels-168975/index2.html

Nice pics of some big machines here http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/guides/William_Doxford_and_Sons

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=opp_6uhGfKw

john
:)

BigBoy1
08-14-2010, 09:22 AM
I appreciate the information provided. It still blows my mind the size of those machine tools - lathe cross-saddle with a place to stand!

Your Old Dog
08-14-2010, 10:39 AM
Bigboy. I googled "german canon" and came up with this for one. I suspect it's a pic of the one you're talking about.

http://img54.imageshack.us/img54/761/g13oi.jpg

Here's another one but huge file so will do a link to it.

http://www.hmdb.org/Photos/13/Photo13747o.jpg

This one is US I think:

http://www.hmdb.org/Photos/13/Photo13758o.jpg

scmw
08-14-2010, 02:12 PM
If you ever decide you'd like your very own.....

http://www.davetootill.co.uk/product.aspx?ProdID=5

KiddZimaHater
08-14-2010, 03:17 PM
Now, THAT'S what I call a Radius Turner!
Next project, maybe? :D
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/guides/images/c/cc/Bolschaal.jpg

wierdscience
08-14-2010, 03:36 PM
It's pretty hard to beat the US M-65, towed or flat car mounted.



More on the M65-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UTdy1Yp1h5A

The whole system-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B9F-l_3eLcE&feature=channel

jugs
08-15-2010, 07:44 PM
Another
http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/gafas/craven-brothers-manchester-limited.html

SlickTX
08-17-2010, 04:44 PM
Now, THAT'S what I call a Radius Turner!
Next project, maybe? :D
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/guides/images/c/cc/Bolschaal.jpg

I've noticed that eye protection was not a priority for them.