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View Full Version : OT -- I am going about this the wrong way...



Liger Zero
08-19-2010, 09:26 PM
I keep burning myself on the thermoset molds. I've tried various types of arm-sleeves. I've tried different kinds of gloves.

I give up. My left arm is pocked with a dozen burns, and I have 18 on my right. Red scorch-stripes, a couple decent blisters... Ouch.

Thermoset is where the money is so I'm not giving it up... What I need is a way to alter my skin so it doesn't burn.

I'm thinking carbon-fiber sub-dermal weave... possibly genetic alteration. Do any of you have a nano-molecular assembly array? Or a self-genetic-alteration kit? If I alter my DNA I could replace my arm-hair with rock-wool.

Suggestions? Leads? Equipment Suppliers? Little help here please...











:D

dp
08-19-2010, 09:29 PM
Have you considered chainmail sleeves? Google it.

Liger Zero
08-19-2010, 09:41 PM
Have you considered chainmail sleeves? Google it.

All I'm getting is pictures of idiots in armor... but I do recall hearing about woven mesh gauntlets... Thanks for the tip, I'll look into it tomorrow.

Toolguy
08-19-2010, 09:57 PM
They have leather sleeves for welders. Just the sleeves. They are connected by a leather strap that goes behind your neck.

KINGWELD
08-19-2010, 09:57 PM
Liger,
Have you tried welders leather sleeves? I would think they would help
a bunch. Just a thought.

Toolguy types faster then I do.

Black_Moons
08-19-2010, 10:10 PM
Leather or cotton are the best choices when dealing with high temps. something like a jean jacket can do wonders.

Does not melt like synthetics, Tends to not burn through easily (you can take a propane torch to a jean/leather jacket for a few seconds with no or little effect)

If globs of molten stuff hit it, it should insulate it long enough for you to pull the jacket away from your skin.. then let it safely cool and set. Or just take the jacket off..

Liger Zero
08-19-2010, 10:20 PM
They make 'em with straps like that? That's EXACTLY what I need. Clips and pins don't work, I need something more robust.

I'll look into this as well tomorrow.


Currently I use a yellow-fuzzy-kevlar sleeve that has elastic. They tend to bunch and twist, exposing my skin

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v469/Lizoid/BurnIsBurn.jpg

These are the latest. My elbow is quite scared up too... and I got more on the other arm.

Part of the problem is the design of some of these molds... they have guide bars and pins that have to be kept hot. I have to reach around them.

Clips pop off and pins rip my shirts, long sleeves don't work very well as they are too thin to block the heat.



Long straps though... that just might do it.


EDIT: Jean material... straps... maybe some insulation between layers... I think I might need to talk to that creepy old lady with the sewing machine down the road. (she's actually very sweet, she calls herself "creepy old lady" and laughs when she does it.)

dp
08-19-2010, 10:32 PM
All I'm getting is pictures of idiots in armor... but I do recall hearing about woven mesh gauntlets... Thanks for the tip, I'll look into it tomorrow.

Here's some manly men in ballistic mesh:

http://www.texasartcat.com/ballisticmesh.html

http://www.arksafety.com/productList.php?sectionId=6&manId=46

Gloves and sleeves. They never wear out. I've only seen them used in fish packing canneries, and to protect from flying knives.

fishfrnzy
08-19-2010, 11:15 PM
This will make you look silly, but......

Go to goodwill and get a leather jacket and with a sharp knife cut away anything that is not usefull.

dp
08-19-2010, 11:22 PM
This will make you look silly, but......

Go to goodwill and get a leather jacket and with a sharp knife cut away anything that is not usefull.

Hmmm - There may still be a use for my old Berkeley High School jacket. Red body, gold/yellow leather sleeves, 80 lbs too small and 45 years old ;)

Edit: Yikes - 49 years old. I got it in 1961.

dewat
08-19-2010, 11:33 PM
This might be way off, but...... when I worked in a die cast plant (AL & MG )
we used plies to pull the parts off. Is there a tool you could make that would work without damaging the part , maybe a suction wand.

Liger Zero
08-19-2010, 11:36 PM
This might be way off, but...... when I worked in a die cast plant (AL & MG )
we used plies to pull the parts off. Is there a tool you could make that would work without damaging the part , maybe a suction wand.

In a word, no...

Not with the jobs in house. Down the road when we start building jobs we'll design them to be "operated" as much as possible.

Flying-Phantom
08-19-2010, 11:57 PM
Ouch! Try some Silver sulfadiazine on that burn. When I used the Silver sulfadiazine it killed the pain and gave a cool feeling.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silver_sulfadiazine

boslab
08-20-2010, 12:15 AM
Apart from the expensive STIFF engineered fabrics the best ive found is melton cloth, its wool fibre as used by steelworkers , look up fondrymans jackets, it also comes as armlets with elastic cuff its good up to 900 degrees, mine gets splashed quite regularly, a big slash of steel will go through....ow that hurts
mark

darryl
08-20-2010, 12:23 AM
Somewhere back in the seldom used grey cells is a memory of a cloth what was heat reflective. Wait- it's coming to me- yes! Asbestos cloth! Just kidding-

Actually I do faintly recall something about a cloth that was heat reflective, but it's not coming forward at the moment. It seems that many solutions require a thick covering of some sort, but of course the better it may work, the more awkward it probably is to wear. Maybe check with firefighters or other emergency response people- could get a good steer out of it, if not a direct endorsement of a certain product. I would think there's something out there reasonably well suited to the job.

doctor demo
08-20-2010, 12:42 AM
Maybe something like this?

http://simpsonraceproducts.com/products/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=10&products_id=1445&sort=

Steve

Weston Bye
08-20-2010, 06:22 AM
Wow. Burned almost to the armpit. How big is the mold?

Where I work we have a couple of transfer molding operations. Unloading finished parts is easy enough, as the molds are on a shuttle - one upper mold on the ram and two lower molds on a horizontal shuttle.

Seems that the space for dropping the slug of material into the transfer cylinder on the upper mold is always too tight and is naturally always hot - but not as deep as yours appears to be. Hands toughen up, but armpits?

Tell us more about your operation. Doesn't seem too Off Topic to me.

panchula
08-20-2010, 09:39 AM
A bit pricey, but may work.

http://simpsonraceproducts.com/products/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=4_270&products_id=2190

http://www.coverallsale.com/nomex-shirts.htm


-Mike

Duffy
08-20-2010, 10:30 AM
Go see your "creepy old lady" and take her an old-fashioned, genuine wool blanket. Melton cloth is a great idea, but I suspect that in the US today, most fabric stores could not even SPELL it, let alone know where to get it. Have her run you up a pair of sleeves with velcro cuff fasteners, (for safety and convenience,) and an adjustable srap across the shoulders to keep the sleeves where they belong.
My wife, who is somewhat of an expert in these matters, suggests that if the blanket is old and well-washed, the wool will have "felted," making it ideal and, best of all, not particularly scratchy on the skin.
Be warned:- these will be warm to wear; you cant have cool safety cheap!
Years ago, in smelters and rolling mills, the "standard rig" was heavy WOOL shirts, socks and trousers, and wooden soled boots. It was the same temperature in those places whether you were naked or protected and wool worked best. On the pouring floors or at the furnace faces was a different set of circumstances.

Weston Bye
08-20-2010, 11:43 AM
WOOL shirts

Wool? LZ, Didn't they issue you a wool jumper in the Navy? Even if they made you give it back, you can pick them up at military surplus stores. Cut away whatever you do or don't need.

Bill McLeod
08-20-2010, 01:47 PM
I have no ideas to stop the burns but after your burned I suggest a clear plastic film that I use on similar burns (I'm not that bright either). The manufacturer is Smith&Nephew and it's called Opsite Flexifix. The picture you posted of your burn would be a good candidate, it prevents it getting irritated further and does not get in the way, probably around .002" thick. Make sure if you find a sleeve that works to let us know your not alone!

TGTool
08-20-2010, 02:14 PM
The wool suggestion seems good. It reminds me of tour at a rug coop in India. The tour guy emphasized that all these were wool rugs and you could verify that this way. He pulled out a propane tank and one of those weed burner wands a proceeded to torch a big black patch on this rug. He pointed out that it didn't keep burning, but quit as soon as the flame was gone, then took a brush and scrubbed off the black patch and there was the rug looking like it did before. It impressed me, anyway.

maweis
08-20-2010, 02:38 PM
If you need heavy woolen sleeves, find a knitter and have
the sleeves knitted out of 100% wool, have them knitted loose
then felt them. Felting is easy just wash the sleeves in hot water
in a washer then immediate plunge in cold water repeating until
the correct size. Anyone that has had a nice wool sweater shink up
knows about felting. Google felting for more detail. Nomex is nice, but
costly, wore nomex fire gear a few years back, never got burnt during several structure fires

Mark

Liger Zero
08-20-2010, 05:21 PM
Wow. Burned almost to the armpit. How big is the mold?

Where I work we have a couple of transfer molding operations. Unloading finished parts is easy enough, as the molds are on a shuttle - one upper mold on the ram and two lower molds on a horizontal shuttle.

Seems that the space for dropping the slug of material into the transfer cylinder on the upper mold is always too tight and is naturally always hot - but not as deep as yours appears to be. Hands toughen up, but armpits?

Tell us more about your operation. Doesn't seem too Off Topic to me.



Not that big. Just cramped. It's a round part, the mold splits as it opens. Three huge guide pins engage and push the sections close as the mold closes. It's also a three-plate mold, the third plate works as a stripper for the runner. The whole thing clamps up and is held shut with 165 tons of force during injection.

I am concerned because I have to start thinking of "helpers" and "employees." my skin will grow back... I don't mind. I can't have the hired help getting injured though.

Liger Zero
08-28-2010, 04:36 PM
Being that I had to reach into the mold between two pins (side and lower) I got thinking... Measured a few things... and removed a guard. Reworked the locating ring, reworked the back plate of the mold frame and drilled/tapped a new threaded hole for the ejector tie-in.

Result is the mold is reoriented so I can reach in through what used to be the TOP of the mold. More room that way.


As for arm bands, I found some steel mesh ones that I like. Those are mine. A friend is knitting some wool ones for me as well. Going to order two more pairs of mesh ones, and if the wool ones work good I'll have her make 10-12 pairs in different sizes.