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View Full Version : I thought expanding foam could only make ulgy.



Black_Moons
08-22-2010, 09:39 PM
And all this time, I thought expanding foam only results in ulgy jobs with blobs everywhere.

http://englishrussia.com/index.php/2008/05/29/lithuanians-and-pu-foam/

+10 bonus points if you can get to the bottom of the page without laughing.

RKW
08-22-2010, 09:53 PM
Actually pretty amazing work even though I don't really like punked-out cars.

Did I miss a step though? I would expect the foam to be covered with fiberglass or body putty.

TGTool
08-22-2010, 09:54 PM
Boy, that's a trip and a half! Lightweight body work with energy absorption built in. What more could you want?

chipmaker4130
08-22-2010, 10:15 PM
Perseverance and talent. That guy's got both. When I see someone doing so much with such basic, minimal equipment it makes me wonder whether I'd even start.

wierdscience
08-22-2010, 10:33 PM
Done similar years ago on a friends Rotten Nova,everything from the back glass to the bumper was foam and fiberglass.

38_Cal
08-22-2010, 10:40 PM
Remember, in Spanish, Nova means no-go! :D

David

Deja Vu
08-22-2010, 10:40 PM
I did the side doors and rocker panels on my earlier van with foam ...and a little aluminum house flashing and soffit trim thrown in.
yes, i covered it with bondo.

J Tiers
08-22-2010, 10:43 PM
As far as expanding foam..... and ugly........ might be in the eye of the beholder

Most / many of the facades of the luxury hotels in Vegas are made with it....as well as many other similar places. That "carved stone" you see is often foam base and a sprayed urethane coating over it.

A local company(since bought out, I believe) made and sold the urethane foam precursor materials for several of those projects. Isocyanate / polyol materials, cooked up just North of the airport, next door to a long "barrow" covering nuclear waste materials from the Manhattan project.

Deja Vu
08-22-2010, 10:49 PM
As far as expanding foam..... and ugly........ might be in the eye of the beholder

Most / many of the facades of the luxury hotels in Vegas are made with it....as well as many other similar places. That "carved stone" you see is often foam base and a sprayed urethane coating over it.

A local company(since bought out, I believe) made and sold the urethane foam precursor materials for several of those projects. Isocyanate / polyol materials, cooked up just North of the airport, next door to a long "barrow" covering nuclear waste materials from the Manhattan project.

Yes, its common in the sign industry.

Oh! don't you mean....ulgy:
a situation when a shooting, fight or beatdown might happen.
oh **** its bout 2 get real ulgy up in here.:D

Michael Edwards
08-22-2010, 10:54 PM
+10 bonus points if you can get to the bottom of the page without laughing.


No bonus points for me. That coat he is wearing in the fifth pic did me in.


ME

Boucher
08-22-2010, 10:57 PM
In years gone by we used to take a plastic coffee cup and mix up some foam and put it in a friends desk and close it. He would then have to disassemble the desk to get it open and spend a hour getting his drawing instruments out of the foam.

oldbikerdude37
08-22-2010, 11:09 PM
The first thing I saw was the HUGE rims.

Sportandmiah
08-22-2010, 11:50 PM
You may laugh, but the guy is a genius. That is incredible.

quadrod
08-23-2010, 12:12 AM
If it ever gets wrecked I'd hate to see the crash seen. Probably look like that seagull hit by randy Johnson's fast ball.

Doc Nickel
08-23-2010, 12:14 AM
The skill and artistry demonstrated is nothing short of amazing. I've seen this article before- it's a year or two old- and I'm still impressed with the workmanship.

That said, the resulting car is horrendously ugly. It's the kind of car that Aztek owners look at and go "ew!"

The dude knew what he was doing from a technical standpoint, sure, but a blind guy'd have a hard time making it look worse. :D

Doc.

Ken_Shea
08-23-2010, 12:21 AM
+10 for me, that guy is incredibly talented.

Black Forest
08-23-2010, 05:48 AM
Can you imagine what it would of cost MB to build that car? Millions! This guy did it in his shop. Perfect!

bob ward
08-23-2010, 07:05 AM
In a previous life I used to make and sell rigid PU foams, and often sold foam sheet or DIY foam liquids to car makers and modifiers. One guy I recall made a very creditable 80% size Ferrari F40.

As is seen in the photos, foam sculpting is an excellent method of quickly achieving complex shapes, and these guys are very good at it. The process isn't shown but I'm assuming they took the almost essential step of fibreglassing the foam before painting it.

Rustybolt
08-23-2010, 09:01 AM
Aside from the fact that front on it looks like a red oriental rodent, pretty clever.

wierdscience
08-23-2010, 09:23 AM
The first thing I saw was the HUGE rims.

I want to see if I can chrome some tractor rims and sell them:D

gnm109
08-23-2010, 11:53 AM
Nice worski! Too much for me, however. I wonder how much Wodka it took him to get that job finished?

dp
08-23-2010, 12:23 PM
I recognize that grill ... http://crazy-frankenstein.com/free-wallpapers-files/cartoons-wallpapers/looney-tunes-wallpapers/bugs-bunny-wallpaper.jpg

kendall
08-23-2010, 01:36 PM
Actually I have been doing the same thing with cars/trucks for many years.
Always called it foam-a-fender.

It's an easy to use and form material. No need for molds, and surprisingly light and durable, easy to repair in case of damage.

Back in the early 80s, I had a fiat 850 spyder that had a complete custom front end made of foam. I bought it with a demolished front end after the PO drove it under the tail end of a truck.
For that I used sheet foam to form it, then the 2 part to flesh it out and sculpt it. That''s the car that got me into doing body work as a sideline, because I got several requests to do the same for other cars.

I've even used it to match up impossible to find paint grade wood work in old house restorations.

It also works to make storage containers for fragile and bulky tools and equipment. Wrap the equipment in plastic bags, fill a box halfway with foam lay a sheet of plastic over it then press the equipment into the foam

Don't know how many small heavy or fragile items I've shipped with spray foam as the packing material.

Michael Edwards
08-23-2010, 02:38 PM
If my memory serves me correctly, seems like I remember the late great John Britten using a similar method to make the gas tank and maybe more with that method.

ME

Doc Nickel
08-23-2010, 04:43 PM
Well, the proper method is to make the part as a prototype in the foam, then cover/smooth it with bondo, fiberglass or whatever, then use it to form a female fiberglass mold from which you lay up and pull the finished fiberglass part.

That car's probably intended for show only, and unless they slathered some fiberglass over the foam, I suspect the surface and finish is pretty delicate.

Doc.

Evan
08-23-2010, 05:00 PM
Back in the early 80s, I had a fiat 850 spyder that had a complete custom front end made of foam. I bought it with a demolished front end after the PO drove it under the tail end of a truck.
For that I used sheet foam to form it, then the 2 part to flesh it out and sculpt it. That''s the car that got me into doing body work as a sideline, because I got several requests to do the same for other cars.


I did exactly the same thing to my Fiat 850 Spyder that I bought new in the year it came out in the 60s. I drove it into a rock wall in heavy fog one night and crushed the front bodywork. Fixed it with foam and fibreglass by bringing the sweep of the hood futher down in front and it looked much better than the chopped off blunt nose it came with.

saltmine
08-23-2010, 07:06 PM
Crunching up a Fiat 850 isn't all that hard. A friend of mine had one, and one "cruise night" we were standing around outside a local burger joint, talking about cars, when a fatassed acquaintance got tired of standing and plopped his posterior down on the 850's hood. The body shop gave him a quote of $1200 to fix the sheetmetal, provided there was no structural damage underneath.

Gotta love those FIATS! I used to have a customer who actually wore the engine in his Fiat 850 Sport Coupe out every six months. I'd call the import parts store, and order the parts...A tennis ball can containing four pistons, rings, and wrist-pins. A box about the size of a pack of cigarettes (a fulll set of rod & main bearings) and a manilla envelope containing a full gasket set...total: $175.

Drain the fluids, jack the car up and unbolt the engine...roll it out on a floor jack. Unbolt the exhaust and the water pump. Pick up the engine and carry it to the bench for a teardown. I could drive the car in at 8:00AM, do a complete overhaul, and drive it back out that afternoon...

bob ward
08-23-2010, 08:55 PM
.....
That car's probably intended for show only, and unless they slathered some fiberglass over the foam, I suspect the surface and finish is pretty delicate.
Doc.

Definitely a delicate finish without a fibreglass skin under the paint.

Even as a 'no touchee' show car, differential movement between the multitude of foam pours would have a bogged (bondoed) painted and glossy but non-reinforced surface looking like crap in very short order.

gnm109
08-23-2010, 09:26 PM
Crunching up a Fiat 850 isn't all that hard. A friend of mine had one, and one "cruise night" we were standing around outside a local burger joint, talking about cars, when a fatassed acquaintance got tired of standing and plopped his posterior down on the 850's hood. The body shop gave him a quote of $1200 to fix the sheetmetal, provided there was no structural damage underneath.

Gotta love those FIATS! I used to have a customer who actually wore the engine in his Fiat 850 Sport Coupe out every six months. I'd call the import parts store, and order the parts...A tennis ball can containing four pistons, rings, and wrist-pins. A box about the size of a pack of cigarettes (a fulll set of rod & main bearings) and a manilla envelope containing a full gasket set...total: $175.

Drain the fluids, jack the car up and unbolt the engine...roll it out on a floor jack. Unbolt the exhaust and the water pump. Pick up the engine and carry it to the bench for a teardown. I could drive the car in at 8:00AM, do a complete overhaul, and drive it back out that afternoon...

I once owned a Fiat 600. I got it from my brother who had persisted in running it on the freeway at top speed. He had somehow dropped a valve which, thankfully, got stuck into the piston top and didn't hurt the block.

Thus, when he gave it to me, I had only to replace the head, piston and rod. I got a nice head at a wrecking yard for $50 and the total with a new piston and rod and gaskets was about $150. I recall that I honed the cylinder a bit which only had a few scratches in it. Turns out it was a nice little car for running around town but had a top speed of only about 70 mph and I was afraid to run it that fast after replacing the parts.

As you say, they were very easy to work on.

AD5MB
08-23-2010, 09:45 PM
foam dome home:

http://maps.google.com/maps?ll=44.795892,-85.581227&spn=0.001873,0.005262&t=f&z=18&ecpose=44.79589186,-85.58122674,560.29,-0.002,0,0

guy made two pie slice shaped molds, one inner, one outer. foamed it with the expanding foam used as boat flotation. glued the foam together. made openings with a chain saw. known as the Flintstone house

saltmine
08-23-2010, 09:52 PM
Yeah, gnm109, now that FIAT owns Chrysler, maybe the Chrysler guys will get the message....Of course, FIAT is still a "third world car".

I used to drive all over Southern California in a Renault R-5....seriously higher quality car than a FIAT.

I got it for $20...And the only problem it had was a fuel-cut solenoid on it's PICT-30 carburator. I remember the look on my buddy's face when I paid the guy for the car, drove it down the street, and around the corner. Got out, opened the hood, and gave the solenoid a firm twist. The engine stopped belching black smoke and it settled down into a nice, smooth idle...
I drove it for four years, then sold it to a Puerto Rican fellow, for $400. He piled his whole family into it, and drove to New York.

I ran into him several years later, still driving my old Renault. He shook my hand and told me it was the best automobile he ever owned.

Thruthefence
08-23-2010, 10:18 PM
That entire English-russia website is a hoot. Some of the old abandoned soviet era houses are spectacular examples of "old world craftsmanship wood carving." (maybe that foam carving guy learned it at grandpa's knee.)

here's some really bad jailhouse tattoos.

scroll down for the T rex!

http://englishrussia.com/index.php/2009/03/02/tatoo-fail/

gnm109
08-23-2010, 10:24 PM
Yeah, gnm109, now that FIAT owns Chrysler, maybe the Chrysler guys will get the message....Of course, FIAT is still a "third world car".

I used to drive all over Southern California in a Renault R-5....seriously higher quality car than a FIAT.

I got it for $20...And the only problem it had was a fuel-cut solenoid on it's PICT-30 carburator. I remember the look on my buddy's face when I paid the guy for the car, drove it down the street, and around the corner. Got out, opened the hood, and gave the solenoid a firm twist. The engine stopped belching black smoke and it settled down into a nice, smooth idle...
I drove it for four years, then sold it to a Puerto Rican fellow, for $400. He piled his whole family into it, and drove to New York.

I ran into him several years later, still driving my old Renault. He shook my hand and told me it was the best automobile he ever owned.


When I first came to California in the late 1950's as a young lad, the streets were packed with VW's and Renault Dauphine sedans. The Renaults featured some sort of Franco-American electric clutch and two different horns - "Town Horn" and "Country Horn". They were certainly popular at the time.