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klemchuk
08-25-2010, 10:48 PM
Do any of you folks know what kind of steel is used to make forklift forks?
The reason I ask is that I just ordered a new set of forks that are a foot longer and will have two old forks to use for wharever.

Evan: I made the phone calls to the actual factory in Guelph Ontario and was reassured that they are indeed made in Guelph or Lima Ohio. Everything is NOT made in China as some people think!

doctor demo
08-25-2010, 10:55 PM
I made the phone calls to the actual factory in Guelph Ontario and was reassured that they are indeed made in Guelph or Lima Ohio. Everything is NOT made in China as some people think!

That way they can slap a ''made in the USA'' sticker on the import fork lift.:D

Not sure what steel is used but the tapered tips make nice wedges that come in handy on all sorts of projects.


Steve

fishfrnzy
08-25-2010, 10:57 PM
They are made of different types of steel. Sometimes HSLA A572-50 (high strenght low alloyed) steel, 1045-1060 heat treated material, T1 heat treated steel and others. May or may not be weldable. Sorry, may only be good for counterweigh or similar.

lazlo
08-25-2010, 10:58 PM
Good forklift tines are made from 4140 and 4340 -- great material.

The only reason I know is I've been dumpster diving for anvil materials, and several of the local blacksmiths tell me forklift tines make great anvils :)

knedvecki
08-26-2010, 12:40 AM
Ditto Lazlo. Chrome Moly

wierdscience
08-26-2010, 01:03 AM
Used forks here are worth $100/fork for ITA mount and $150-300/fork if they are rod mount depending on size.

Or you could cut them up:D

lazlo
08-26-2010, 09:56 AM
Used forks here are worth $100/fork for ITA mount and $150-300/fork if they are rod mount depending on size.

Or you could cut them up:D

Yah, I was looking for one that was crashed or worn out, so I could plasma or flame-cut a 1 foot section off it.

Too_Many_Tools
08-26-2010, 12:41 PM
That way they can slap a ''made in the USA'' sticker on the import fork lift.:D

Not sure what steel is used but the tapered tips make nice wedges that come in handy on all sorts of projects.


Steve

Could you expand on how you use the tips for wedges?

I am always looking for another project to make.

Thanks

TMT

Too_Many_Tools
08-26-2010, 12:44 PM
Yah, I was looking for one that was crashed or worn out, so I could plasma or flame-cut a 1 foot section off it.

That may be hard to do.

Many yards now will not sell any used fork, complete or partial, because of liability.

TMT

lazlo
08-26-2010, 04:09 PM
Many yards now will not sell any used fork, complete or partial, because of liability.

Bummer. They apparently work well as a poor-man's anvil:

http://www.youtube.com/v/fW1n0Xts0H8&color1=0xb1b1b1

Boucher
08-26-2010, 04:37 PM
That was interesting. I recently saw a small anvil someone sculpted from a piece of Rail Road Rail. It was small but reflected some real talent. Would a larger piece of rail upside down work like the fork lift tine? I posted this a while back but I mounted my anvil on a piece of 12 3/4" well casing and filled it with concrete. It is heavy and stable but it is easy to roll/walk it around.
http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n50/boucherbyron/Anvil.jpg

Jaakko Fagerlund
09-27-2013, 09:47 AM
Steel forklift forks (unpaid advertisement) are the answer to all problems. I have a couple of them but am not sure though whether the steel used is HSLA A572-50 or not. I particularly don’t care if forks are made in China or not, as long as they are good quality and durable!
Nice spamming, please get your things and get out.

Willy
09-27-2013, 10:00 AM
What a dick-wad.
He's selling forklift forks and he doesn't have a clue what they're made of!
Yeah give me a dozen of those.:rolleyes:

Toolguy
09-27-2013, 11:38 AM
I use a couple of pieces about a foot long milled and surface ground parallel and equal thickness for work supports on my hydraulic press. I know they aren't going to bend or break.:)

lakeside53
09-27-2013, 01:11 PM
Nice spamming, please get your things and get out.

huh? did I miss something? this thread is three years old!

Jaakko Fagerlund
09-27-2013, 02:06 PM
huh? did I miss something? this thread is three years old!
Yeah I know, the post has been deleted but it is shown without a working link in my quote.

Doozer
09-27-2013, 02:19 PM
Ask Cascade. I did. I think they told me 1045 steel.

--Doozer

winchman
09-27-2013, 03:00 PM
I know you can cut them with a plasma cutter, because some kid in the class did it to our almost new florklift. :(

Jon Heron
09-27-2013, 05:18 PM
Cascade is one of my customers, I am in there frequently, I will ask the next time I am in. Whatever the type of steel used, they are definitely heat treated, done right there on site at Cascade.
Cheers,
Jon

tmc_31
09-28-2013, 10:38 AM
Hey Byron, hope you are doing well. My first experience with a lathe was making an anvil out of a piece of railroad track. I chucked a 12" section of RR track in an old 20" Southbend that a friend of mine had in his fixit shop and milled the top of the rail flat. That was in the early 70's, I still have and use that old anvil.

At the time I didn't think a thing about how well the HSS bit that I used cut the top of that track. Now that I know how hard the top of a rail road track can be, it surprises me that the work hardened surface didn't rub the bit into a nub.


That was interesting. I recently saw a small anvil someone sculpted from a piece of Rail Road Rail. It was small but reflected some real talent. Would a larger piece of rail upside down work like the fork lift tine? I posted this a while back but I mounted my anvil on a piece of 12 3/4" well casing and filled it with concrete. It is heavy and stable but it is easy to roll/walk it around.
http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n50/boucherbyron/Anvil.jpg