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View Full Version : Dangerous or What! (Uncoiling Band Saw Blades)



HAP
09-08-2010, 07:59 PM
So, after reading all of the advice to ditch the stock blade of a new band saw, I picked up a new Lenox Bi-Metal today. After reading the instructions, I removed the twist tie from the new blade. Thinking that there clould be a lot of spring energy stored in the blade I tried to figure a way to control how it opened. Suddenly I was met with the blade right in the mouth and I was bleeding on my inner forearm. I was really pissed that it did no go as planned. Next time I think I will just throw it out in the grass and run... Anyone care to share your technique as to how you do it?

Regards,
HAP

brian Rupnow
09-08-2010, 08:09 PM
Kinda like making love to a grizzly bear---Hang on tight and don't let go no matter what happens!!!

ENTERPRISE LATHE
09-08-2010, 08:13 PM
We use between 28'-50' bandsaw blades they come in a box that is about 6" wide x 36' tall x 36" high, we lay the blade with the teeth towards the floor and use a long pair of cutters to cut the ties it works ok but the blade sometimes jumps about a foot in to the air

Dr Stan
09-08-2010, 08:16 PM
Kinda like making love to a grizzly bear---Hang on tight and don't let go no matter what happens!!!

I like that. :D

One of the few times I'll wear gloves in the shop is when I'm uncoiling a band saw blade. The best I can tell you is that "it takes practice". Hard telling how many times I've done it and I still risk getting nailed each & every time. Hang on tight, keep control of the blade, and go as slowly as possible.

I have seen others toss the blade across the floor to cause them to uncoil, but that does create the risk of damaging the teeth.

David Powell
09-08-2010, 08:23 PM
I hang on tight after I cut the last tiewrap, count to three, yell " Geronimo" and throw the damned things as hard and as far as I can letting go just at the end of my throw. So far the score has been a scratch on the workshop clock, one china mug, a very scared workshop cat and the odd bit of paint. I am sure they are out to get me! regards David Powell.

Carld
09-08-2010, 08:29 PM
Over the years I developed my way. I hold the blade with one hand and remove the ties with the other and toss it like it's a firecracker and watch it bounce around. When it stops I put it on the saw. I haven't seen where it damages the teeth.

MotorradMike
09-08-2010, 08:37 PM
Hmmmm:

Thanks.

I just got a new blade and had no idea they bite.
I'll open it in the morning using your suggestions/warnings.

George Hodge
09-08-2010, 08:43 PM
I've noticed that when I open them,about half of them were assembled backwards and I have to coil them up again and give it another toss.

MrDan
09-08-2010, 08:49 PM
Over the years I developed my way. I hold the blade with one hand and remove the ties with the other and toss it like it's a firecracker and watch it bounce around. When it stops I put it on the saw. I haven't seen where it damages the teeth.

+1 for close your eyes and toss.

Your Old Dog
09-08-2010, 08:49 PM
I get my wife to do it.......usually just before we are due to go out to dinner. We've had to scrap quite a few dinner plans :D

spope14
09-08-2010, 08:55 PM
I wish I could explain it in words, but kind of the opposite of the way I coil the things works for me. I use both feet in the coiling process, kind of a strange work up of a method I learned. Works well. Still get the occassional bite though.

Black_Moons
09-08-2010, 09:03 PM
I wear a full jene jacket, gloves, face shield, eye protection, long pants, etc. Then try my hardest to control it. And hope I don't uncoil it inside out.

wierdscience
09-08-2010, 09:10 PM
Another vote for throw it on the ground.

The one bandsaw mill I had used a 14'6" blade 2" wide 1.4" tooth spacing.The only thing worse than getting tangled up in it was tripping while carrying it back to the mill and falling on it:eek: :mad: :eek:

Too_Many_Tools
09-08-2010, 09:15 PM
Throw an old blanket over the coil before you let the monster loose.

TMT

Dr Stan
09-08-2010, 09:31 PM
I get my wife to do it.......usually just before we are due to go out to dinner. We've had to scrap quite a few dinner plans :D

Boy now that's a cheap way of getting out of buying dinner. :D

Toolguy
09-08-2010, 09:43 PM
I just hold the loops as they start to unfold (with gloves on). It's easy really. I wouldn't think of throwing a blade out in the shop loose. That can cause all kinds of damage to other things. If the teeth are backwards all you have to do is twist the blade when it's uncoiled and it will flip around where the teeth are going the other way.

Mike Burdick
09-08-2010, 09:52 PM
... Next time I think I will just throw it out in the grass and run...

Regards,
HAP

That sounds pretty good to me!:)

Robin R
09-08-2010, 10:26 PM
I can coil a bandmill blade easily without even using a foot, but I still struggle with uncoiling them. Unfortunately they are long enough, that throwing them might not get them far enough away. I think Brian Rupnow has it about right.

x39
09-08-2010, 10:37 PM
I generally buy blade in 100' rolls. Lennox's packaging seems to be getting cheaper and cheaper. A year or two back I had a package fail and the blade started coming out the side. I took it outdoors and let 'er rip on the lawn, and then was faced with the task of getting the genie back in the bottle and repairing the package while keeping the thing contained. Great way to waste a couple of hours.

whitis
09-08-2010, 10:47 PM
Ouch.

Throwing the blade is a time honored, if crude, method if you have a clear area as it puts distance between you and the blade but you can do it by hand if you use one of the safer proceedures. Gloves and a face shield are a good idea, though those who are in practice can coil/uncoil without.

It can be easier to learn to uncoil a blade if you start by coiling it first rather than starting with a precoiled blade; that way you can better visualize the twisting of the blade.

This is an area where video beats written descriptions:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PI1Okb4Vp9Q
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WUiEJEZMTc
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=btOSZNjWMyk

Forrest Addy
09-08-2010, 10:58 PM
Unclip it, hold tight, and throw it in the wash-up room just before lunch.

Toss it into a playground.

Etc. Etc.

If you look you'll ee the coil naturally want to open so two end loops swing out from the center. Lean to "read" the coiled band and you can grip the right places (ware gloves) and by exertng counter-force greatly reduce the violence of the uncoiling.

It takes a couple of demos to master this technique

An old saw filer I knew taught me the trick. He could open a 2" swaged toothed band 15 ft long in an almost civilized fashion - which is like flossing the teeth of a wild tiger.

airsmith282
09-08-2010, 11:02 PM
cant say iever had a problem opening a new band saw blade but i did almost cut the thumb off once cutting a gun grip out ,bloody mess it was , never do that again,,

TGTool
09-09-2010, 12:06 AM
Practice coiling one up and the uncoiling will make more sense. There's a way to grasp two sides of the standing loop and force the head down and the two sides in and over to make a triple loop. Long blades sometimes get a double treatment to make a smaller coil. It works slicker than snot when you get the hang of it and once blades knew I knew their dirty secret they quit intimidating me.

darryl
09-09-2010, 12:51 AM
Toss it across the lawn- practice coiling it up and toss again. Pretty soon you'll be an expert and the lawn will be cut. :)

boslab
09-09-2010, 02:03 AM
i do the exact opposite of coiling them, didnt realise it though! what would you do with say a 18' x 3" coiled blade?
i take them outside teeth down boot on blde to resist bouncy blade attack, brush on the back of the coil, snip and slowly lift the brush, it will snake but away from you, but if you keep it restrained with the brush they are fairly harmless, you dont ever want to stick your face in an uncoiling blade!
mind you it takes 2 of us to recoil the big pedrazzoli blades, one each end and twist in opposite directions while walking foreward, dont let go!
mark

danlb
09-09-2010, 09:36 AM
It's funny how a similar thread on PM was quite adamant about how easy bandsaw blades were to handle.

My experience matches most others. I wear gloves and a jacket, but I have just a small bandsaw.

Dan

bborr01
09-09-2010, 10:11 AM
Ouch.

Throwing the blade is a time honored, if crude, method if you have a clear area as it puts distance between you and the blade but you can do it by hand if you use one of the safer proceedures. Gloves and a face shield are a good idea, though those who are in practice can coil/uncoil without.

It can be easier to learn to uncoil a blade if you start by coiling it first rather than starting with a precoiled blade; that way you can better visualize the twisting of the blade.

This is an area where video beats written descriptions:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PI1Okb4Vp9Q
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WUiEJEZMTc
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=btOSZNjWMyk

I use the same method as is used in the second video, and have for decades.

I can't remember ever getting cut on one while coiling and un-coiling.

Brian

MuellerNick
09-09-2010, 10:36 AM
I'm doing it like in the first video (with one foot). To uncoil, just the other way round.
I never wear gloves etc., thus speeding up the learning process. :D

Oh, my blades are 3.09 m long and 27 mm wide.


Nick

PixMan
09-09-2010, 10:47 AM
I use the same method as is used in the second video, and have for decades.

I can't remember ever getting cut on one while coiling and un-coiling.

Brian

+1 !!

I was given the lesson of how to do it (shown in that 2nd video) be the local Lenox rep back in 1986, and haven't had a problem since.

It's nuts to be throwing one, or stepping on one, but especially so with a bi-metal blade. You'll risk bending or busting off teeth, trashing a new blade. Using the method shown in the 2nd video, I've coiled & uncoiled blades up to 1-1/4" wide and over 15ft long. No problem!

KIMFAB
09-09-2010, 12:22 PM
Ran into this solution from a blade company.

http://www.kimfab.com/pictures/forum/bladea456.jpg

we will see how it works out.

MuellerNick
09-09-2010, 12:59 PM
It's nuts to be throwing one, or stepping on one

I have enough control in my feet. Also, I'm not as fat as the average US. ;)


Nick

brian Rupnow
09-09-2010, 01:00 PM
I hang on tight after I cut the last tiewrap, count to three, yell " Geronimo" and throw the damned things as hard and as far as I can letting go just at the end of my throw. So far the score has been a scratch on the workshop clock, one china mug, a very scared workshop cat and the odd bit of paint. I am sure they are out to get me! regards David Powell.
Funny---Thats what I do when I'm done with the bear!!!:D :D :D :D

Mcruff
09-09-2010, 04:13 PM
For 35 years I have just taken the ties off and tossed it in the floor, problem solved. Wh ywould you need to recoil it if it opens backwards? Just grab a pair of gloves and flip the blade around.

.RC.
09-09-2010, 06:36 PM
+1 for close your eyes and toss.

not sure how that helps, but anyway.. :D:D

radkins
09-09-2010, 08:35 PM
I've noticed that when I open them,about half of them were assembled backwards and I have to coil them up again and give it another toss.



A salesman at lowes said he has had two different customers bring blades back because they were wrong and would not work on their saw, the teeth were backwards! :rolleyes:

gwilson
09-09-2010, 08:58 PM
You guys should try cutting the straps on 12' of 12" wide .042" 1095 spring steel!!! That is violent,and you have to be there with the snips to cut the straps.

Damned hard to handle yourself to uncoil it slowly,too.

boslab
09-09-2010, 09:55 PM
if your worried about a little old bandsaw blade you should see a cobble on a 7 stand rolling mill, it comes at you at 60 Km/hr
i wonder how many bandsaw blades have been coiled and uncoiled around the world today, really its not a bloody tiger its a sawblade, pin one end down, end of, if your dull enough to shove your face in it you will get bit!
ask your starret/eclipse/etc sales guy to show you how to handle them if you dont know, you need someone to practically show how to safely handle one.
if you dont know how to do it then leave it alone untill you are trained, then you have the risks assesed and you can do it without injury.
if its not safe then dont do it.
probably the safest for the uninitionated is to throw the thing by the sound of it, though my boss would sack me for that but hey, live and let live.
mark

gwilson
09-09-2010, 10:41 PM
I just toss them. I don't believe it has perceptively damaged a blade. I don't like those 1" wide bi-metal blades when they uncoil!

KiddZimaHater
09-09-2010, 11:30 PM
That's why we have grass in our yards.
Throw it in the grass.:)

MuellerNick
09-10-2010, 02:11 AM
if you dont know how to do it then leave it alone untill you are trained,

I have a training blade for sale! Completely dull (hard spot at the second cut of a new blade). I sell it for $100 + s & h. :D


Nick

oldtiffie
09-10-2010, 02:15 AM
Wot-a-lotta tossers.

BWS
09-10-2010, 09:24 AM
Can honestly say I've never tossed one......on purpose.We usually don't wear gloves.............and end up with minor cuts.Can't remember the last cut,rare.Do it real slow and watch which direction it wants to strike,then kinda help it do its natural uncoiling.Grip in a way that teeth are pointed at your buddy.....or not.BW

tlfamm
09-10-2010, 11:04 AM
<snort> How timely! Just got a new bandsaw + 4 new coiled blades. Had no idea what I was in for.


Does one recoil uncoiled blades for storage - or is that just asking for more pain?


And is a Kevlar suit the recommended attire?

MuellerNick
09-10-2010, 11:31 AM
And is a Kevlar suit the recommended attire?


Decent protective traditional gear is still made and available today (http://www.yatego.com/tsgps/p,473059e0e4277,472f427c1450b2_1,ritterruestung--schwert--lebengross--blank).
Your health should be worth the 299.- €

PS: One size fits all.

Nick

lazlo
09-10-2010, 11:42 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WUiEJEZMTc

That's very cool! I've always done the throw and pray, but I want to try that.

Toolguy
09-10-2010, 12:16 PM
That's how I do it - like the guy in the video. It's safe and easy. Coiling back up takes a couple of minutes to get in your head, but once you get it, it's well worth the effort to learn how. I wear heavy leather gloves though, as my blades usually don't have the plastic protective strip on the teeth.

winchman
09-10-2010, 02:48 PM
We have two large bandsaws at the school. Both take blades that are about 11 feet long and 1 inch wide. I always toss the coiled blades on a patch of grass not far away from the shop. I've never had one bounce more than a couple feet, never close enough to make me nervous.

I can coil them up by holding them at arm's length and twisting in opposite directions, but I usually cut them into sections, and put them in the scrap metal bin.