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View Full Version : Pictures for your viewing pleasure; shaper, TPG, various projects



Elninio
09-12-2010, 03:58 PM
I'm in the process of cleaning and old shaper. For the previous thread see here:
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=41996&page=3

Here are whole pictures of the machine for identification purposes (which model is it?)

http://img411.imageshack.us/img411/416/img00149201009072001.jpg (http://img411.imageshack.us/i/img00149201009072001.jpg/)
Notice in this one the table/box is yellow inside - I didn't paint it like that so it may be the original paint - this could be key in identifying the model or manufacturer. (I've removed this picture to prune the thread, see the others below)
http://img534.imageshack.us/img534/2479/img00160201009072004.jpg (http://img534.imageshack.us/i/img00160201009072004.jpg/)

Stay tuned ...

Elninio
09-12-2010, 04:06 PM
Finally painted the vice, it says "Jergens" on the top face. http://img408.imageshack.us/img408/4206/img00157201009072003.jpg (http://img408.imageshack.us/i/img00157201009072003.jpg/)

Two sets of shoes on the top and bottom are used to regulate the height of the motor (for dialing in pulley tension), the pipe clamps ride on the white circular shoes, which are bolted in the machine casting through 1/2 rod. The rod has a stainless steel pipe over it, which compresses the white plastic shoes.

The pump is a gast rotary pump and pushes something like 10cfm at 15psi. The air is a bit warm comming out of the pump, so this will produce less cooling than I had originally anticipated.
http://img185.imageshack.us/img185/6455/img00161201009072004.jpg (http://img185.imageshack.us/i/img00161201009072004.jpg/)

Top view. Where should I mount the control switch? I could mount it in the front, like this, or mount it on a swinging arm which connects to the base of the machine.
http://img842.imageshack.us/img842/9973/img00167201009072007.jpg (http://img842.imageshack.us/i/img00167201009072007.jpg/)

Meanwhile, I've been working on some tools and fixtures to help me cut gears for the shaper. The first is an adaptor for my little 3" chuck to mount on a 10" rotary table:

http://img52.imageshack.us/img52/9981/img00121201008171535.jpg (http://img52.imageshack.us/i/img00121201008171535.jpg/)

Stay tuned ...

Elninio
09-12-2010, 04:14 PM
The smooth finish on the bottom and side are due to the rub resulted from cutting this hardened material. Sure it was flame hardened when they cut it, but the disk came from a large square piece, so how far inside does the hardening effect go? http://img340.imageshack.us/img340/3508/img00122201008171536.jpg (http://img340.imageshack.us/i/img00122201008171536.jpg/)

If you're interested in the pictures for the restoration of the rotary table, see here: http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=42796

The setup for cutting these channels was very sketchy - I had the chuck expanding on the inner-bore of the rotary table, which is only about 3/16 depth of clamping force, excluding the radius on the tips of the jaws and edge of the rotary table bore. Turned out alright but some of the channels are larger than the others due to the work piece moving and shifting (I'm talking about 3/8" bigger!)

http://img689.imageshack.us/img689/6190/img00125201008200014.jpg (http://img689.imageshack.us/i/img00125201008200014.jpg/)

Fly cutters made from large bolts. The bolts are 1.5" on the hexagon IIRC, and cost a dollar each (cheaper than buying from the metal store).
http://img266.imageshack.us/img266/6997/img00166201009072006.jpg (http://img266.imageshack.us/i/img00166201009072006.jpg/)

Stay tuned ...

Elninio
09-12-2010, 04:18 PM
Boring bars, 3/8", 1/2" and 5/8" on the shank. Will attempt to fill in lead, so if you're interested in deep hole drilling, keep in touch.

http://img4.imageshack.us/img4/4516/img00164201009072005.jpg (http://img4.imageshack.us/i/img00164201009072005.jpg/)

Tool post grinder stone, 2":
http://img202.imageshack.us/img202/1475/img00172201009072009.jpg (http://img202.imageshack.us/i/img00172201009072009.jpg/)

Belt for TPG, can anybody find geometry specs for it? I've looked everywhere! I'm starting to doubt this is even the real manufacturer, it may just be an import clone, like how they have "Nicke" ripoff for "Nike", slippers at the dollar store.
http://img201.imageshack.us/img201/9649/img00170201009072008.jpg (http://img201.imageshack.us/i/img00170201009072008.jpg/)

http://img9.imageshack.us/img9/1248/img00171201009072009.jpg (http://img9.imageshack.us/i/img00171201009072009.jpg/)

Stay tuned ...

Elninio
09-12-2010, 04:32 PM
A million words could be said here, but I'll try to keep it brief because the tool store is closing in an hour, and travel time is 20 minutes minimum. The bearings are rated for 22,000 RPM. 10mm thickness by 17mm ID, 38OD mm. They are loosely pressed into the body, but prodruting 0.5mm from each casing, and will be held into place with those rings. The front of the spindle will clamp the bearing on the inner bore through a shoulder on the inside and a nut (to be made) on the outside. The end of the grinder will be floating. This is not the correct way to hold a bearing, but it is sufficient and acceptable since it will allow me to adjust the way the bearing sits on the shaft. For example, I could put more force on one edge of the bearing in hopes of reducing run-out by micro-managing these infinitesmally small quantities. The back of the grinder will also receive nuts for taking out the slack in the bearings (which is probably not even measurable). The correct way would have been for the rings to thread onto the body, and the bearings to have been angular. The body is 2" with 1/2" wall stock, machined of course.

Notice on the left side, the bearing doesn't go directly to the shoulder. That's because it is a bit more snug on that end, and don't want to press it in just yet. The shaft is probably at most 1/2 thou larger there, since my 0.001" digital caliper can barely tell the difference.http://img831.imageshack.us/img831/607/img00192201009090010.jpg (http://img831.imageshack.us/i/img00192201009090010.jpg/)

8/32 holes, about 1/2" deep (well the holes are deeper, but the tap was spiral point). Check out the broken tap, it's chinese. Also check out the other 5 holes which were effortlessly tapped with an english tap (made in england). The tap was called 'blue wizard' or something like that, 10$ at KBC tools It was like cutting cheese - I had it in my small drill press chuck, turning entirely by hand, and never backing out for chips. The chips would fit and clear entirely in the tap's grooves, without getting full. It's a 75% depth tap. I'll get you the exact name when I get back from the tool store.

http://img201.imageshack.us/img201/5561/img00217201009120358.jpg (http://img201.imageshack.us/i/img00217201009120358.jpg/)

Elninio
09-12-2010, 11:40 PM
hey let me know if you appreciate me taking lots of photos - I don't want to be clogging up the forum with topics people don't care about ...

wierdscience
09-13-2010, 02:13 AM
Honestly the work you have done looks good,congrats on the shaper!

But,the posts have too many pictures.One good well done picture of each step is good enough for most here to draw information from.

The pictures that are rotated 90* are of little use.Multiple pictures of the same view are un-nessicary.

Just a suggestion,but you will get more audiance if you reduce the pic count and increase the description of what you post.Most are here to learn and share and even thou a picture is worth a thousand words,a brief accurate description of the how contributes equally to the forum.

The shaper,chuck mount,and spindle are really three seperate subjects and done right would be three seperate threads.

IMHO you should go back and edit the pics in this thread,remove the bad ones and the duplicates and then add a good description or two so people who can't tell from the pics can learn.

I'll give you an A for effort,but a D for execution.Cool?

rockrat
09-13-2010, 08:02 AM
I enjoy the photos. Focus is always an issue when taking photos up close but you have a good start. The photo information indicates that you are using a blackberry (or similar device using their software) to create the photos. You may want to upgrade to a camera that has a few more functions to allow for better lighting with a flash and a macro option.

Also, you will always get a half-half response to a photo heavy post. Those running on a T1 or cable wont see issues but there are still many who use dialup. You can use locations like photobucket.com that generate a thumbnail and allow you to use that thumbnail to give a "click on the photo for a larger view" option. This allows faster loading of a post and also allows a user to open a larger photo if they want to.

Now that being said, you have a good project here. Looks as though you have put quite a bit of work into the shaper.

I am anxious to see how your spindle works out.

rock~

Evan
09-13-2010, 10:59 AM
Looking good on the work. Until you have used a quality tap it is very hard to understand the difference it makes. Once you have the cheap taps begin to look very expensive. Nothing can spoil a job so easily as a broken tap in a critical location. It's doubly true because tapping is often one of the last operations making the part costly in terms of time and effort.

On the photos, resize them down to maybe 640 wide or at most 700 pixels. The only time I use larger is for my astrophotos because some people like to use them for wallpaper. Also, when saving a photo as a jpg file most software will give you an option to select the quality level. Try some testing to see how far you can lower the quality without uglifying the image.

This is your image which was originally almost 100KB file size. I reduced it to 640 pixels wide and saved it at a lower quailty and now it is only 36KB. That is one third the loading time for slow connections.

http://ixian.ca/pics7/elninio.jpg

If you haven't found it already you can download the Army shaper manual from my website here:

http://ixian.ca/gallery/thumbnails.php?album=18

Elninio
09-13-2010, 07:31 PM
Looking good on the work. Until you have used a quality tap it is very hard to understand the difference it makes. Once you have the cheap taps begin to look very expensive. Nothing can spoil a job so easily as a broken tap in a critical location. It's doubly true because tapping is often one of the last operations making the part costly in terms of time and effort.

On the photos, resize them down to maybe 640 wide or at most 700 pixels. The only time I use larger is for my astrophotos because some people like to use them for wallpaper. Also, when saving a photo as a jpg file most software will give you an option to select the quality level. Try some testing to see how far you can lower the quality without uglifying the image.

This is your image which was originally almost 100KB file size. I reduced it to 640 pixels wide and saved it at a lower quailty and now it is only 36KB. That is one third the loading time for slow connections.

http://ixian.ca/pics7/elninio.jpg

If you haven't found it already you can download the Army shaper manual from my website here:

http://ixian.ca/gallery/thumbnails.php?album=18

Thanks for the manual, I've pruned the thread.

Elninio
09-24-2010, 12:01 AM
Here's some information on the tap:
http://img202.imageshack.us/img202/315/img00020201009232130.jpg (http://img202.imageshack.us/i/img00020201009232130.jpg/)

http://img535.imageshack.us/img535/914/img00022201009232130.jpg (http://img535.imageshack.us/i/img00022201009232130.jpg/)

lazlo
09-24-2010, 12:27 AM
Elninio, you have a bunch of great projects here! You might consider splitting it up into separate threads -- we have a very short attention span here :)

wierdscience
09-24-2010, 12:50 AM
That is a quality tap,here's the link to the KBC page-

http://www.kbctools.com/usa/PDF/u0106.pdf

Something about the cutting edges on that one don't look right,looks like somebody modified it or it's dull.

It is also a spiral point or gun tap which push the swarf ahead of the tap.On a blind hole like the ones on your spindle those chips pack into the bottom of the hole.If too many pack in there the tap can bottom into them and foul the tap causing a break.

Try tapping part way,backing the tap out and fishing the swarf out before finishing the thread.

Elninio
09-24-2010, 02:15 AM
That is a quality tap,here's the link to the KBC page-

http://www.kbctools.com/usa/PDF/u0106.pdf

Something about the cutting edges on that one don't look right,looks like somebody modified it or it's dull.

It is also a spiral point or gun tap which push the swarf ahead of the tap.On a blind hole like the ones on your spindle those chips pack into the bottom of the hole.If too many pack in there the tap can bottom into them and foul the tap causing a break.

Try tapping part way,backing the tap out and fishing the swarf out before finishing the thread.

The tap looks worn because of the micro-dust sticking to it after use.

When I used it the chips didn't pack to the bottom - rather they curled up into little spirals that stayed in the tap! Like a nose hair!

camdigger
09-24-2010, 02:16 AM
If you like the Blue Wizard taps, try the Blue Merlins. They're spiral flute and shoot the chip up and out of the hole. They still break when you tag the bottom of a blind hole though...:o

Elninio
09-24-2010, 02:31 AM
how do the blue merlins manage to do that?

PixMan
09-24-2010, 06:50 AM
how do the blue merlins manage to do that?

Magic.

:D

Your Old Dog
09-24-2010, 07:19 AM
hey let me know if you appreciate me taking lots of photos - I don't want to be clogging up the forum with topics people don't care about ...

Don't worry about it. I love seeing this stuff and could look at it all day. Looks like you been busy. Nice to see someone actually doing something instead of being like the bikers say.....a poser :D

Your Old Dog
09-24-2010, 07:28 AM
Try tapping part way,backing the tap out and fishing the swarf out before finishing the thread.


I don't do much tapping so I just bought a can of canned air for computers with the red nozzel and shove that in the hole, cover it up with my free hand to keep the chips out of my face and give it a blast to remove the chips from the hole.





When I used it the chips didn't pack to the bottom - rather they curled up into little spirals that stayed in the tap! Like a nose hair!

Have you tried lanolin on those nasty nose hairs? It'll soften'em right up. :D

Elninio
09-24-2010, 08:59 AM
Magic.

:D

No no, the wizards are magic, the merlins are aquatic!

Deja Vu
09-24-2010, 09:23 AM
By Elninio...... "The end of the grinder will be floating. This is not the correct way to hold a bearing, but it is sufficient and acceptable since it will allow me to adjust the way the bearing sits on the shaft. For example, I could put more force on one edge of the bearing in hopes of reducing run-out by micro-managing these infinitesmally small quantities. The back of the grinder will also receive nuts for taking out the slack in the bearings (which is probably not even measurable).

I just thought this arrangement is just as correct as any other method for creating a spindle. As in all designs, there are limitations present. Your bearing arrangement will be fine with the inclusion of the everpresent design constraints.
Bloy


P.S.Having fun watching your thread here.

Elninio
09-24-2010, 03:31 PM
I just thought this arrangement is just as correct as any other method for creating a spindle. As in all designs, there are limitations present. Your bearing arrangement will be fine with the inclusion of the everpresent design constraints.
Bloy


P.S.Having fun watching your thread here.

The way you quoted that is kind of misleading, but I understand what you mean. First, a floating end is desired at the back. Second, holding a bearing by six screws is not as correct has having one big nut on the shaft tighening on it because the six screws do not exert even pressure, and because they are point pressures.

The guy at the store who sold be these told me if one were to place their hand (which is moist) on the inside of the bearing, it would be ruined. Now keep in mind these are greased already. If I had gotten the bearings rated for 40k rpm or 50k rpm, perhaps six screws would have ruined them, due to the deflection it could create in the rotational path of the balls. It is also worth mentioning that the back shoulder that the outer brace of the bearing sits on has a radius, and I don't know if the chamfer on the bearing is small enough to clear it, or perhaps it is interfering with it, which can cause infinitesmally small alignment problems (this is perhaps desired with this model, depending on the surface finish I'm able to produce I may choose to reduce play by "mis-aligning" the bearings a bit).