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madman
09-16-2010, 10:24 PM
Old Volkswagon Beetle Tire Jack. I wish to purchase one or find one. I plan on using it as a holdown device aka guy lautards article many years ago. Anyone have one they wanna sell or give away? Thanx Mike

Your Old Dog
09-16-2010, 11:04 PM
like this or the post type?

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_4LWNF7ykf9s/TGoJbnmQkgI/AAAAAAAAD6Y/N_50WEO5hfU/s1600/jack.jpg

or,

http://www.bugwelder-shop.com/images/111-011-031-E.jpg

or,

http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w245/keithstarr/DSCF1071.jpg

or

http://www.busdepot.com/images/parts/237011031.jpg

Or either of the two posted on this site:

http://www.bugwelder-shop.com/index.php?cPath=388_786&language=en&osCsid=e8ec52c4c21281edc7e5d193c7f88381

madman
09-20-2010, 10:34 PM
The one with the round base and the two jack post handle sockets. I want to use it as a holddown device. ? Where can I buy one? Thanx Mike

ckalley
09-21-2010, 01:56 PM
You might be able to find them at www.partsplaceinc.com. They have lots of vintage VW parts. I've had good luck with them. No affiliation, just a happy customer

Craig

brian Rupnow
09-21-2010, 02:31 PM
Those old ones with the round post were the bodymans best friend. Instant Port a Power. They would push or pull, so by sliding a peice of pipe with a flat plate welded onto one end of it over the round part, you could jack out any caved in panels, and by welding a chain hook to the base and to the slider you could pull door pillars straight.

DICKEYBIRD
09-21-2010, 02:32 PM
Here's one: http://autobodystore.net/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=KEY77043B&Category_Code=3P

We have a similar one in our shop for spreading Land Rover frame rails when dropping the crossmember out to do trans fluid changes. Gotta be careful with it though. It can sproing out at the worse possible moment and try to kill you! We changed to a porta-power which is safer.

Black_Moons
09-21-2010, 04:36 PM
You might wish to look into a 'Farm jack'

Same sorta idea as the round post, But much more common these days, Check any farming store (princess auto if you live in canada) or big tool store

http://www.northerntool.com/images/product/images/144842_lg.jpg

They use pins that engage into the I beam, So a little more 'secure' IMO then the pipe clamp style. Also I think they are often designed so when you exceed the safe load limit, a pin in the handle shears, preventing you from lifting it but keeping the load secured.

They can be used to pull, push, spread, clamp, lift or suspend, etc, And are a little easyer to bolt accessorys onto and hook chain to. Cheap too, $50 for the one on the website I stole that image from, rated 3 1/2tons!

PS dickeybird: Hydrolic jacks are NOT safe to be under loads supported by, especialy ones with hoses like a portapower. a relief could fail, a cylinder or seal could leak, hose could burst or leak, coupler coupler could fail, etc. Iv heard of hydrolics suddenly letting go mins or hours or even a day after pressure was applyed. Allways use a posative engagement like a farm jack or jack stand for supporting anything that falling would injure someone (or someones pocket book)

pcarpenter
09-21-2010, 04:52 PM
Hydrolic jacks are NOT safe to be under loads supported by, especialy ones with hoses like a portapower. a relief could fail, a cylinder or seal could leak, hose could burst or leak, coupler coupler could fail, etc. Iv heard of hydrolics suddenly letting go mins or hours or even a day after pressure was applyed. Allways use a posative engagement like a farm jack or jack stand for supporting anything that falling would injure someone (or someones pocket book)

Egads!! What you wrote about hydraulic jacks is certainly true and jackstands are the right answer, but one of those hi-lift jacks is certainly not!!! They end up imbalanced enough due to their lift heights (and the design of the small center post and small foot) that they are horribly tippy. They are way too well known as widowmakers to recommend as any way equivalent to a jack stand.

Paul

DICKEYBIRD
09-21-2010, 07:29 PM
PS dickeybird: Hydrolic jacks are NOT safe to be under loads supported by, especialy ones with hoses like a portapower. a relief could fail, a cylinder or seal could leak, hose could burst or leak, coupler coupler could fail, etc. Iv heard of hydrolics suddenly letting go mins or hours or even a day after pressure was applyed. Allways use a posative engagement like a farm jack or jack stand for supporting anything that falling would injure someone (or someones pocket book)Jeez, it's not holding the car up in the air or left in a precarious position for long periods. You jack the rails apart a bit, pull the crossmember and release the pressure. You finish your other work, jack the rails again, stick the crossmember back in, release the pressure and you're done. A portapower with the right attachments is much stiffer than a spindly jack.

ps: Black_Moons, extra points off for crappy spelling.:D

bruto
09-21-2010, 08:00 PM
Egads!! What you wrote about hydraulic jacks is certainly true and jackstands are the right answer, but one of those hi-lift jacks is certainly not!!! They end up imbalanced enough due to their lift heights (and the design of the small center post and small foot) that they are horribly tippy. They are way too well known as widowmakers to recommend as any way equivalent to a jack stand.

PaulIN addition, the mechanism of a high lift jack will kick the handle with enormous force if you let it go at the wrong time, and it is sufficient to knock all your teeth out or worse.

I've used a Hi Lift (the real US one, not the Chinese imitation) for a number of things, including moving small buildings (you can pick up a corner, tip it off the jack, and walk it for quite a distance if you're careful), and it's a great tool in the right place, but dangerous as all hell if you use it wrong or even if you're using it right and let your attention lapse.

I may have one of those friction VW jacks around. I'll try to rummage down in the barn in the next couple of days and report back. Somewhere I think I even have a modified version that was set up as a fence stretcher.

Arcane
09-21-2010, 08:24 PM
A little story for you...years ago we were riding out to the worksite and in the distance we saw a guy changing a rear tire on his half ton. He had pulled off parallel to the highway onto an approach and had the jackall under the rear bumper, which was the old "farmer's bumper" which extended from one side to the other. He had it jacked up a mile in the air to get the tire off the ground because of the rear end hanging from the spring and as we approached, the jack started to go over sideways on him, since he had jacked almost all the weight off the left side rear tire too. He jumped up and tried to grab the jack to stop it but he wasn't quick enough, after a certain point the jack slid along the bottom of the bumper and you can imagine just how fast it went once it started to slide. The top end of the jack ended up hitting the guy in the thigh and it was something of a miracle that it didn't break his leg. Musta hurt like a b*tch though...I never seen a guy hop around like that...ever!

BigMike782
09-21-2010, 10:29 PM
Try here,
www.thesamba.com