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cuemaker
09-26-2010, 10:11 PM
worth the effort for $265 or am I gonna have to spend lots of money on collets etc to get it to go?

Takes R8 taper. No tooling included. Weighs about 500 lbs

http://i201.photobucket.com/albums/aa129/xringx/oldmill1.png
http://i201.photobucket.com/albums/aa129/xringx/oldmill-1.png

Tony Ennis
09-26-2010, 10:17 PM
How are the vise and table? And the motor? Motor looks small.

cuemaker
09-26-2010, 10:27 PM
motor is a single phase dayton at 3/4 hp per plate. If I do this I would up the motor hp and add a VFD.

Just not sure if this is where/how I want to spend my dollars. But price is attractive as right now dont have a lot to spend

Dont know anything else.

Bill736
09-26-2010, 10:50 PM
That appears to be a combination vertical and horizonal knee mill, which is a neat find. If it takes R8 tooling, it will be cheap and easy to obtain what you need. The condition of the rest of the machine is certainly a factor. The importance of many such condition factors depends on the accuracy of the work you intend to do. The price is right !

miker
09-26-2010, 10:57 PM
What is the brand?

Rgds

cuemaker
09-26-2010, 11:00 PM
I think its Garvin

miker
09-26-2010, 11:13 PM
Here is a little info on Garvin Mills.

http://www.lathes.co.uk/garvinmillers/



Rgds

cuemaker
09-26-2010, 11:24 PM
the more I look at it, the more I think its been tinkered with.... To me, it looks like someone switched the top arm around, mounted some kind of head to it and taaadddaaaa, a vertical mill....

lazlo
09-26-2010, 11:27 PM
Not worth the effort, IMHO.

ZINOM
09-26-2010, 11:52 PM
I might not have a super valid opinion, but I'm not seeing a way to lower the quill....and to me that's something that I need for a machine like this to be of a lot of use to me.

I guess as a straight up miller you would set the DOC and then mill away....but unless I had a lot of room and some extra dough, this just wouldn't get as much use as I'd like to get out of it.

That's just my 1 cent.

John

reggie_obe
09-27-2010, 12:46 AM
It is, or was a horizontal mill. As currently configured, someone cobbled some type of head onto the end of what was the mill's overarm. The actual milling spindle is below it and has had its cone pulley removed. The motor and head setup aren't original and the vice on the table is a drill press angle vise. The right angle head might be of interest to someone, if it could be identified. I seriously doubt that the milling head on it is R8, more likely B&S #7 or 9.

The Artful Bodger
09-27-2010, 12:59 AM
I do not know how good the head is but if the table and the knee are in good condition there is certainly the makings of a quite rigid basic vertical mill.

For the price I would buy it as a 'project'.

John

MuellerNick
09-27-2010, 01:27 AM
Worth the scrap price - 20% for hauling.

If you look at it as a project, the outcome will be an antique mill plus a lot of time invested. It will not be a very useful tool.

I'd pay 50 bucks and put it on my driveway. :D


Nick

whitis
09-27-2010, 02:14 AM
That looks like a practical machine for a home shop, especially one with space constraints and where there is an interest horizontal milling and antique machines.

I would suggest just using the existing motor, especially if you are concerned about the cost of tooling. That is a lightweight machine for its size so it may not be built for heavy hogging (though it must be able to take some force on X for horizontal milling but it seems to lack provisions for the arbor braces) and you can do a lot with 3/4 horsepower. Use the money for tooling.

Drilling could be a pain as it doesn't appear to have a quill so you have to raise and lower the knee. Y travel may be limited.

The vertical spindle is probably a retrofit or at least has been rebored for R8 (if it is actually R8). I don't think R8 existed when that machine was made. Garvin, did, interestingly make a vertical (only) mill back in about 1902. Garvin advertised horizontal mills similar to the one pictured, but with a different Z elevation mechanism as plain millers.

http://blacksmithandmachineshop.com/American-Machinist-Febuary-1916-PG-106.html

I think seller is wrong about the vintage - that is probably about a century old. The flat belt cone pulleys are missing.

It will need some restoration work, though the condition from what little we can see looks pretty good.

Fasttrack
09-27-2010, 02:31 AM
Not worth the effort, IMHO.

Ditto. While the price seems attractive, I think you will find it needs a lot of TLC to bring it back to a useable state and, even then, it will probably lack the features that you would most like to have. A quill is one such feature.

I dunno ... it just looks like a "hack job" of a mill.

tyrone shewlaces
09-27-2010, 08:16 AM
Yea, it's not what anybody would call "ultimate", but fer $265 I'd do it just to keep it from becoming re-bar in the Chinese dam.

Unless space is really tight, it could be nice for leaving set up for some kind of milling that comes up often enough. While it is set up to be horizontal/vertical, the changeover wouldn't be very quick so it would likely stay set up for one or the other most of the time. Not sure the VFD and new motor would be worth the money, but that depends on what you use it for.

Convert it to CNC !!! yea that's the ticket.

A.K. Boomer
09-27-2010, 08:43 AM
I might not have a super valid opinion, but I'm not seeing a way to lower the quill....and to me that's something that I need for a machine like this to be of a lot of use to me.

I guess as a straight up miller you would set the DOC and then mill away....but unless I had a lot of room and some extra dough, this just wouldn't get as much use as I'd like to get out of it.

That's just my 1 cent.

John



I totally agree --- what's a mill without a quill?

This machine would work for quite a few things but take extra long time to do it - I thing the X lead screw would be totally worn out in no time as it has the toughest job of any of them due to the weight of the table/saddle and your going to be using the daylights out of it,,, You will get sick of cranking the table up and down in no time,

I would expect to see this machine way out in the boonies somewhere living with some guy named "Jeb" who don't get out much and also owns a banjo...

Don't buy it or your entire existence will be compromised, You might measure the round horizontal head shaft and see if its the same size as the Bridgie that uses that design -- that would be the only thing that could bring hope to this situation...

J Tiers
09-27-2010, 08:47 AM
Well, it looks like I am in the minority.....

the "AUTHORITIES" here say to give up and scrap it.

Here is how I look at it..... Starting with the idea that you want a mill.... you have that which is in the pictures, and it is not feozen up

I probably would NOT have paid 265 bucks for it, but I think there is a good chance that I would have had it on the trailer .... there would have been some old-country middle-east marketplace haggling...........channelling uncle Farouk.

1) The parts of a mill which are important and expensive, frame, spindle, overarm, knee, table, etc, are all there.

2) the parts which are missing, the drive train, are not that expensive if you are reasonably clever about making and sourcing parts.

2A)There wasn't that much to them anyway..... if you had gotten the whole thing, it would not have been very helpful, look at the link given previously. Basically a cone pulley to the overhead shaft.... wooo ha, what an advantage THAT would have been.... As for the table feed, don't have one here, don't care.

3) it would have had a flat belt cone pulley on it, which you didn't really want anyway...... flat belts on mills are sucky.... particularly directly on the spindle....

4) it has both a horizontal and vertical head..... which automatically makes it very adaptable. The vertical head is almost certainly without a quill, but that is what the knee is for.....

5) It almost certainly will have some sort of odd non-morse taper in the H-spindle. B&S, Jarno, whatever. If you own a lathe, that is not a problem, arbors are not that hard to make.

if you make it useful and running, you will have a useful machine.

Right now, you will have, to all appearances, a workable vertical mill if you just clean off and oil the thing...... and get it a decent belt.

Quill? Schmill.... My vertical head has no quill either, and the only reason I don't use it more is because it's such a royal pain to attach and remove.

brozier
09-27-2010, 09:03 AM
I agree with JTiers if it does what you want and there is not too much wear in the ways go for it. (after haggling naturally!)

My drilling machine has a quill my milling machine doesn't! :D

Cheers
Bryan

AllThumbz
09-27-2010, 11:41 AM
A lot literally depends on you. Is this going to realistically get done, or will it sit in pieces in your shop waiting for other projects. The latter is what my shop is like, and I wouldn't realistically take in another basket case knowing I may not ever get to it, and pay for the privilege. If, on the other hand, you have a lot of time, and are the kind of person who will dive in and keep on plugging until you "git er done", then you should buy it for $150 or so and take a chance on getting something you can work into a functioning mill for that price.

Just my .02 of course.

Best,


Nelson

Mcgyver
09-27-2010, 12:36 PM
If the bearing surfaces are in rough shape, which you'd expect from the general condition and that its no spring chicken, I'm with the nay crowd. The reason being is that a lot more functional machines can be had for for not much more money. The amount of work to restore, not just paint but restore, is huge....don't expend that energy and expense unless the machine is really worth it.

Fixing them up because they're antiques has merit, but again pick you projects carefully. I don't know how original that is.

MuellerNick
09-27-2010, 12:52 PM
Fixing them up because they're antiques has merit,

It sure has! But one shouldn't start with something broken (chicken - egg).


Nick

The Fixer
09-27-2010, 02:29 PM
This machine has a lot of places where you can attach a heavy chain to which you can can connect a large boat anchor.....
Just my 1/2

gnm109
09-27-2010, 02:59 PM
Highly modified, likely no parts available, a couple hundred hours of work needed. If the owner wants to give it to you free, I'd probably take it, but at $265 it's a non-starter.

By the way, there must be some mystical process used by owners of such items when they calculate their asking prices. It usually bears no relationship to actual value or even to the time involved in repairing the units.

jep24601
09-27-2010, 03:18 PM
You'll be doing the seller a favor at 5c/lb.

mochinist
09-27-2010, 03:21 PM
some paint and some shiny pieces, then sell it as industrial art:D

Lodsb
09-27-2010, 03:23 PM
the more I look at it, the more I think its been tinkered with.... To me, it looks like someone switched the top arm around, mounted some kind of head to it and taaadddaaaa, a vertical mill....
That's exactly what they did. I believe that's how Bridgeport got started - making vertical heads for the old horizontals. And I mean OLD - I'd date yours in the 1890-1900's judging by that curved overarm. Other companies made lineshaft conversion drives using electric motors. I saw an old horizontal for sale last year having a hydraulic drive on the spindle - he was asking $2000 for it... Horizontals can really spit the chips out and they flycut like you've never seen before. Fix it.:)

J Tiers
09-27-2010, 09:21 PM
Highly modified, likely no parts available, a couple hundred hours of work needed.

There must be another universe here, at 90 deg to the one I am in......

The only obvious "modifications" are that they turned around the overarm, attached a vertical head to the end...... and they ditched the big flat belt pulley..... They maybe lost the table drive, IF it ever had one..... which is no guarantee. It might be a model 11 that never had one.

I wouldn't call that "highly" modified......... The old overarm is still available, and the spindle is still there.... There just were NOT that many more parts TO the thing if it were 100% original......

They COULD have cut OFF the old overarm end, but they did NOT.

Just as it sits, you have a vertical mill.......

To get the horizontal mill working, you will have to do SOME work...it needs a pulley and some sort of drive.. Finding a suitable pulley is not that much of a problem, you'll want V-belts, anyway..... You'd need some countershaft and drive anyway even if you HAD got it with all the parts to be a horizontal mill. And you'd probably be ditching some of the same ones that are missing..... unless you happen to have a lineshaft in your shop.....

These are the same guys moaning and whining that say EVERY old machine is "worn out", and that you gotta buy a new chinese machine or else you are a cretinous dolt.

"Hundreds of hours" to get it to do anything????? I'd bet on a good deal less than that to make it mill things..... If it won't cut metal inside of 10 hours, then the pictures are not showing the right things....

And I know about getting old machines running...... I've done it for most of mine.

The only other person I'd listen to here is Nick..... and I think he is being pessimistic....or perfectionistic. But neither of us see anything but what is in the pics.

No parts available? No s*** Sherlock..... it's 100 years old! But in the old days they made things simple...... it isn't like a 1980's CNC that is worth less than the cost of haulage..... You don't need a chip foundry to fix it...... you can MAKE parts as good as what was in it.

You've got more parts towards a vertical mill than I got with the Benchmaster I'm working on..... I'd rather have the one you have the pics of than the Benchmaster, even though I have a spare vertical head to put on the Benchmaster. You have a much bigger table.

PeteM
09-27-2010, 10:34 PM
It looks to be about Millrite sized??

If the table and knee movements are in good shape (maybe a bit of scraping; screws OK but nuts a bit worn), I'm with the minority that thinks it would make a great project.

You'd have a working mill shortly and a reason to look for a bargain on a replacement turret head in the years ahead.

bob308
09-27-2010, 10:53 PM
i am with j tiers. it is a good soild basic mill. find a bridgeport m head mount it up and use it. would not take much to make the other drive work either. a old truck trans and some flat belt pullies.


it is up to you. you have about 4-5000 laying around with nothing to do. or do you have more time then money? then a little thought and work and you are making parts. afterall some of us are home shop machinest. not pro cnc button pushiers.

john hobdeclipe
09-27-2010, 11:09 PM
Consider how much it may cost to get it into good running condition, and then consider if it would enhance your cue making. With a dividing head on the table it may enable you to do fluting that perhaps you could not do otherwise.

Just a thought

lazlo
09-27-2010, 11:57 PM
The only obvious "modifications" are that they turned around the overarm, attached a vertical head to the end...... and they ditched the big flat belt pulley.....

It's a an antique (well over 100 years old) overhead belt drive machine with a badly implemented motor retrofit: undersized motor and a drive belt stretching almost 3 feet :confused:


It looks to be about Millrite sized??

It's way smaller than a Millrite -- almost a benchtop machine. Cuemaker says it's 500 lbs. My Millrite with the full-sized table was 1400 lb.s

MuellerNick
09-28-2010, 05:28 AM
The only other person I'd listen to here is Nick..... and I think he is being pessimistic....or perfectionistic. But neither of us see anything but what is in the pics.


I have to be pessimistic, because I can't touch it. It can be completely seized and then the fun starts. The spindle might be completely worn out and wobble like a cat's tail. I can't judge that by the pictures, just by the age of the mill.
If the spindle is completely worn out, it might be unrepairable or need a lot of money (or a hardening oven, a lathe, a mill and a cylindrical grinder). If a nut of a feed screw is broken, you need a lathe to repair.

Further, I don't know what the buyer wants to do with here. Build world's smallest watch or hack some chunk out of some scrap to make it look like a replacement part for farming equipment?

For a first mill it might be good enough, depending of what he intends to do.

But one thing is clear to me: Take the scrap price as orientation. Don't pay more than double of it.


And don't forget:
A lot of admirable work has been done with a wrong and worn out tool.


Nick

J Tiers
09-28-2010, 08:12 AM
It's a an antique (well over 100 years old) overhead belt drive machine with a badly implemented motor retrofit: undersized motor and a drive belt stretching almost 3 feet :confused:



Sorry you are so confused...... I'm not....

The parts are there, the motor HAS to be "up" unless you want to cut off the end of the overarm, or replace it.

The belt, if you don't like it, can be outfitted with an idler or "guard" pulleys. Could give more speeds, since the only shift right now is at the motor, if there.

Don't get me wrong... I LOVE you guys...... your rejects are working in my shop! 3 drill presses, 2 of which needed work, 2 lathes, 2 mills, 2 shapers: one has a (gasp, choke) crack in a casting but works fine, a T&C grinder, etc, etc.....


I have to be pessimistic, because I can't touch it. It can be completely seized and then the fun starts. The spindle might be completely worn out and wobble like a cat's tail. I can't judge that by the pictures, just by the age of the mill.

Of course...... that was the point of we only know what's in the pictures.

But I give the OP the credit for being able to tell if the spindles are rusted solid, or the table is a teeter-totter.... or the knee adjustment is missing*.... I assume he would not even ask the question if there were anything like that.

Even a siezed horizontal spindle is not a deal smasher..... for one thing, it's really a vertical now, he'd need drive parts and tooling for the horizontal which probably is B&S taper like other Garvins. He'd still need that stuff if it were in original factory condition.

And also, the horizontal is almost surely a babbit or bronze bearing, of a tapered type that would adjust if the spindle bearings had to be cleaned up to a smaller diameter. Something for the future....

* the #11 simple miller has almost no basic parts that are not visible, and the knee adjustment is in a position where it might not be visible in those pics.

Mcgyver
09-28-2010, 08:43 AM
The guy's in Ohio, heart of the rust belt. For 500 (or maybe 250 ) you'd find a 'modern' horizontal, with arbors, vise, maybe vertical head and RT and a bunch of cutters, 3 way power feed (maybe rapids), a motor, 40 or 50 tapper (R8 is very light for a horizontal), 3-5hp, a transmission for spindle and feed and maybe a coolant system.....mine (elliot #2) was all this for $250.

Heck, i'd be iffy if it was a 'modern' one without tooling, you will spend many times the purchase price on tooling ...or just wait until a well tooled one comes along. I see them all the time, one will come along if you're looking. Starting with something like that compared to what you could start with for similar money is nonsensical especially given your location...but then again they guys would argue the shades of blue in the sky.

A.K. Boomer
09-28-2010, 08:50 AM
Sorry JT, all it would take is for me to spend a day with that thing and I would get pissed off,

take a bolt hole pattern where you want real accuracy so you have to center drill first and crank the knee up and down for each of the say 12 holes --- then you switch to drilling and have to crank up and down for 12 more holes -- keep in mind these are deep holes and you have to "peck drill" -- have fun with that - then you switch to the chamfer tool and once again not only have to crank up and down for 12 more holes but have to use the hand dial to keep them all uniform all the while - while having the knowledge that they make mills with quills that have quill stops and you could have had one but instead purchased a reject...

To me a mill without a quill is about half a mill (if that), but suite yerself, to each his own and all that good stuff, He asked an opinion - I don't like it, my 2 cents.

lazlo
09-28-2010, 08:54 AM
It's a an antique (well over 100 years old) overhead belt drive machine with a badly implemented motor retrofit: undersized motor and a drive belt stretching almost 3 feet
Sorry you are so confused...... I'm not....

That's the great thing about opinions Jerry, everyone has one.


the "AUTHORITIES" here say to give up and scrap it.
...
The only other person I'd listen to here is Nick..... and I think he is being pessimistic....or perfectionistic.

So you're the only AUTHORITY? :rolleyes:

Like many here, I've rebuilt a bunch of machine tools, and you're looking at at least 100 hours of work to get an antique lineshaft machine with a bad motor retrofit up and running. For $250 Cuemaker would be better off with a Mill/Drill. Seriously.

Rustybolt
09-28-2010, 09:28 AM
Two questions.

How badly do you need one?

Are you willing to pay the price in time and treasure to get it where you can use it?

cuemaker
09-28-2010, 10:27 AM
Ok, lots of good stuff. Here is more info...

I have way more time and willingness to fix something than money. In fact, I sort of enjoy taking on a project, getting it 80% complete, then letting sit for months as I get distracted with something else, then coming back to finish it.

How I view priorities... Upfront Money, size (how easy to move, and move again), capability.

I have not taken the time to see the mill, but I am assured by its owner its functional in every regard.

Lack of quill I dont think bothers me that much. I dont do anything production.

I know enough that when I do look at it, if its a wreck, I would know it. That dont mean I wouldnt get suckered in by some small detail that I didnt know what to look for or test for...but to me thats the game you play.

I think I am going to make an appt to look at it and haggle.

rockrat
09-28-2010, 12:00 PM
Ok, lots of good stuff. Here is more info...

<snip>

Sounds as though you have it all figured out. Let us know what you do.

rock~

jep24601
09-28-2010, 12:03 PM
For $250 Cuemaker would be better off with a Mill/Drill. Seriously.

I keep hearing about these $250 Mill/Drills but I never come across them.

cuemaker
09-28-2010, 12:25 PM
Sheesh, almost 2 hours way. He will let it go for scrap +, he keeps the endmill, collet and motor.

He said it all works. About 20 thousands play in the table. He thinks the head says Millwright.

lazlo
09-28-2010, 02:08 PM
Sheesh, almost 2 hours way. He will let it go for scrap +, he keeps the endmill, collet and motor.

Collets and endmills are a dime a dozen, and you could do a much better job on the belt drive anyway. Sounds like a project! :)

By the way, Evan's little horizontal mill was also a converted lineshaft machine, and the previous owner did a nice job replacing the lineshaft cone pulleys:

http://vts.bc.ca/pics3/smillb.jpg

Rex
09-28-2010, 02:20 PM
I'm with the "Haggle it down a bit, and buy it" crowd.
In that price range you are $100 shy of a minimill, which also needs some tinkering.
R8 is a big plus. Make sure that is correct.

I have a nice Millrite and an Enco lathe, and minimil and minilathe, so I'm pretty set for my needs. But one of the primary things I use them for is tinkering with project machines. I bought a Burke #4 a couple years ago in about the same shape as your subject. Missing parts, cobbled drive system. I took it down to the last screw, refinished and replaced as I went. I hit your 80% mark and she was a thing of beauty that I just enjoyed looking at. Never found the table leadscrews and attachments I needed. Ended up selling it for a nice profit, never cut a single chip. I'd do it again.

Your mill is usable as-is, so you're way ahead.

recoilless
09-28-2010, 02:24 PM
I keep hearing about these $250 Mill/Drills but I never come across them.

I've got an older (20 yr+) sitting around looking for a home. The Rockwell and Hardinge mills have made it's use surplus to my needs.

gnm109
09-28-2010, 03:27 PM
I keep hearing about these $250 Mill/Drills but I never come across them.


There aren't many. Say what you will about them, they have gotten many people started in HSM. I bought an H.F. Chinese Mill Drill about 1999 and used it for some ten years. Paid $795 on sale and sold it for $500. I advertised it on Craigslist and had several calls. The first person who came out bought it on the spot without haggling.

They usually go for around that price used.

J Tiers
09-28-2010, 11:02 PM
There are apparently 2 kinds of $250 mill-drills.

1) Asian drill presses with the absolute minimum amount done to them to make them function as a mill-drill head.... with a cheap x-y table cast into the "mill" base.

2) A lower end Asian mill-drill, that someone learned on, crashing it several times, and bending various parts that were not obtainable from the importer as spares, until he decided to move up and sell the old one.

Option #1 is pretty crappy....and never was nor will be good. Chattery undersized column, wobbly quill and trailer bearings......

Option #2 probably WAS decent, until the soon-to-be-former owner crashed it and bent the unobtainable parts. Quill may be stripped, worn in the head (non-adjustable), etc.

Both lack a knee, which to me is 17.863 times worse than not having a quill.... They DO HAVE a quill, but that is ALL they have..... hope ya like it....

(Channeling Ggnm109 here, if I can say that when he isn't dead yet)


At least with the old one, you KNOW it was good once, and it may still be as good as needed. LOTS more solid than the skinny round column on a cheapie mill, much less overarm length vs column length hanging out. if you go with the H-spindle, it will really be solid.

100 hours? Sheesh.... there are so few parts in that thing............ Depending on the condition, oiling and a good run up and down a few times with wiping clean might do the knee and table.... or take them out and clean better..... 5 to 6 hours job to take apart and clean, etc. the rest to take apart and clean the V-head, and drive, maybe fit a new belt... Add a couple if you insist on an idler etc, but you can cut metal without it.

100 hours should have new nuts, leadscrews, horizontal drive (not needed for now), etc. maybe a good start on scraping as well, if you are so inclined....

That 100 hour stuff is nice, but not required to get it cutting metal, unless the machine is seriously broken, which I would trust the OP to discover on his own.

Richard-TX
09-28-2010, 11:09 PM
I would not take it for free. Not worth my time.

gnm109
09-29-2010, 12:22 AM
There are apparently 2 kinds of $250 mill-drills.

1) Asian drill presses with the absolute minimum amount done to them to make them function as a mill-drill head.... with a cheap x-y table cast into the "mill" base.

2) A lower end Asian mill-drill, that someone learned on, crashing it several times, and bending various parts that were not obtainable from the importer as spares, until he decided to move up and sell the old one.

Option #1 is pretty crappy....and never was nor will be good. Chattery undersized column, wobbly quill and trailer bearings......

Option #2 probably WAS decent, until the soon-to-be-former owner crashed it and bent the unobtainable parts. Quill may be stripped, worn in the head (non-adjustable), etc.

Both lack a knee, which to me is 17.863 times worse than not having a quill.... They DO HAVE a quill, but that is ALL they have..... hope ya like it....

(Channeling Ggnm109 here, if I can say that when he isn't dead yet)


At least with the old one, you KNOW it was good once, and it may still be as good as needed. LOTS more solid than the skinny round column on a cheapie mill, much less overarm length vs column length hanging out. if you go with the H-spindle, it will really be solid.

100 hours? Sheesh.... there are so few parts in that thing............ Depending on the condition, oiling and a good run up and down a few times with wiping clean might do the knee and table.... or take them out and clean better..... 5 to 6 hours job to take apart and clean, etc. the rest to take apart and clean the V-head, and drive, maybe fit a new belt... Add a couple if you insist on an idler etc, but you can cut metal without it.

100 hours should have new nuts, leadscrews, horizontal drive (not needed for now), etc. maybe a good start on scraping as well, if you are so inclined....

That 100 hour stuff is nice, but not required to get it cutting metal, unless the machine is seriously broken, which I would trust the OP to discover on his own.


You love those old machines, don't you? Unfortunately, the one that the poster is looking at is not worth the time and money to repair and modify it. It's obsolete, obsolescent, junk.

Thank you for mentioning me again. Something about me not being dead. Is this Voodoo?

Keep it up. :D

KEJR
10-01-2010, 09:21 PM
I bought a half worn 9x42 variable speed bridgeport for $500 that needed way oil and a knee crank. The deals are out there, just be patient. It is definitely a buyers market and bridgeports are being sold left and right.

If only I could find a Deckel FP1 for that price... :o)

KEJR

cuemaker
10-01-2010, 09:59 PM
I bought a half worn 9x42 variable speed bridgeport for $500 that needed way oil and a knee crank. The deals are out there, just be patient. It is definitely a buyers market and bridgeports are being sold left and right.

If only I could find a Deckel FP1 for that price... :o)

KEJR

well, if I understand the owner right, its mine for like $50

J Tiers
10-01-2010, 10:45 PM
well, if I understand the owner right, its mine for like $50

it is worth $50 unless all the ways rattle like a pencil in a pickle barrel and teh spindles are seized up with rust....... Even then, it's close on scrap value.

cuemaker
10-01-2010, 10:50 PM
His best offer is scrap value at this point. I view the situation as I dont have a mill, I got $50 bucks, a motor and endmills. Just need some r8 collets. It could be the crappiest mill this side of the Mississippi, but its 100% more mill than I have now. And I am not likely to scare up $500 plus in the next few months with Christmas rolling round to find a somewhat decent vertical mill.

DKS
10-12-2010, 01:49 AM
Just my thoughts, but if you already have a mill and some extra space, I would buy it. not at 265 but maybe 100-150. Looks like a fun project to me but thats your call. Throw it in the barn youll figure out something to do with it someday.

Richard Wilson
10-12-2010, 06:48 AM
[QUOTE=lazlo]


Like many here, I've rebuilt a bunch of machine tools, and you're looking at at least 100 hours of work to get an antique lineshaft machine with a bad motor retrofit up and running.
100 hours? Sure, if you want it to look pretty. Otherwise I'd have that thing cutting metal the day after it got into my shed. Only thing I'd have doubts on is to be really sure what the spindle nose fitting is before I bought it to make sure tooling is reasonably available. I've bought worse and got good work out of them. At that kind of money even if it turns out to be a turkey, you won't loose much on the deal.

Richard

Rex
10-12-2010, 09:21 AM
For $50 that would already be in my truck!

kendall
10-12-2010, 11:01 AM
I'd buy it at $50 with no hesitation. Something to play with and it just may be a diamond.

Incidentally, the first 'lathe' work I ever did was done on an old horizontal mill in my friend's grandparents barn.

RobbieKnobbie
10-12-2010, 12:59 PM
Cuemaker, so did you get it or what? Let's see some pics.

For what it's worth at this point, in your position I would have bought it, fixed it up and used it for all its worth until I found a 'better' machine. Then relegate this one to secondary ops or convert it back to horizontal milling.

Especially at $50, once it's usable and pretty, you could get 10x your money back - probably more.

Alistair Hosie
10-12-2010, 01:05 PM
I wouldn't buy it myself,as I don't have the experience to take on a task like this. It's as you say very old.These parts might be difficult to get.This needs more than a lick of green paint:D I would like to be proven wrong .I suppose it depends on the experience you have you might be less intimidated than I.
I feel for that kind of money you could do better.You wouldn't get much for it here in the UK.Sorry not being a snob just want to see you do well honestly.Alistair

Rex
10-12-2010, 05:00 PM
Well, if the tables is worn out in both axes, and the spindle is a bit loose, what the buyer would have is a better-than-average drill press, which could also do some rough milling. You do well to buy a low-end chinese benchtop drill press for $50.
And then, some of us just accumulate interesting iron if it's cheap.