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M.I. Twice
10-07-2010, 09:05 PM
I was told today that a hole can be punched in or under the passenger door on these new alarm set theft proof cars that can shut off the alarm is this true.:mad:

Black_Moons
10-07-2010, 09:15 PM
Could be. Most locksmiths can get into any car in just a few mins, Without damage. Less then a min if they can damage the car. Alarm disabled a few seconds later if it went off.

Or you can just stick a flatbed next to the car, Use the flatbeds winch and drag the car onto the ramp, Alarm and all, in park, with the E-brake engaged, Skiding all the way up the ramp.

Life lesson: Don't worry about you'r car being stolen, Unless someone is out to steal/repo it, And then they will likey get it reguardless what you do or own. Have insurance/pay off your loans/don't take loans out on your car in the first place.

BillDaCatt
10-07-2010, 10:35 PM
It doesn't matter if it is true or not. Anyone who wants to learn where the alarm parts on a particular car are located just needs to rent one long enough to take the interior panels off and peek under the hood. (or, as suggested by Black_Moons, steal one with a flat bed)

The best theft deterrents are loud unique colors like Hot Pink and low performance low value models like the Saturn SL series. It also helps if the car has a GPS locator of some kind on board. Then you can find it in the event that it is stolen.

My advice, if you live where cars are frequently stolen, don't buy an expensive car.

Falcon67
10-07-2010, 11:06 PM
New cars use a coded key, not so much alarms. Wrong key turned in the lock shuts the computer down. Thats why keys now cost $150~300 a pop. But yea - a flat bed with a good winch gets around all that. Actually, the parking pawl in the trans will skip so you don't end up dragging the tires. You can slow 'em down maybe by turning the fronts to a lock and then pulling the key. They may have to bust a window and pop the ignition lock to free the steering before dragging it off.

wierdscience
10-07-2010, 11:38 PM
Would not suprise me one bit,think about it,it's an arms race,we build a better lock and we create better thieves.

Now we have cars with $300 electronic keys which prevent us from simply buying or having an extra key made at the local hardware store,but does little to curb theft.

Tobias-B
10-07-2010, 11:48 PM
err... generically, no.

t

Black_Moons
10-08-2010, 04:47 AM
You can slow 'em down maybe by turning the fronts to a lock and then pulling the key. They may have to bust a window and pop the ignition lock to free the steering before dragging it off.

Nah, when my dad got the scrappers to pick up one of his cars that we could'nt recall where the key was, they just draged it right onto the flatbed with the front tires locked at 45 degrees, just stuck little 'skids' under the front tires to help it slide.

camdigger
10-08-2010, 11:25 AM
Having a flat bed tow unit is quicker, but all the commercial tow units here carry dollies that slip under the tires of one axle or the other while the other end is held up by a tow sling or other lift arrangment. The car is towed away with the wheels never having turned a single revolution. No contact is made with the towed car except on the running surfaces of the tires. Spend a little time looking out the window of a coffe shop in a tow away zone in a city or watch an episode or two of "Wrecked"
... A real eye opener.

With the type of industry around locally, winch, mobile crane (aka pickers), and tow units are available to +/- 55 Ton.

danlb
10-08-2010, 01:58 PM
There is no single way to disable alarms or even a single way to hotwire all cars. Locksmiths subscribe to information services that tell them exactly what to use for each make and model to prevent damage. The information comes in books or online web sites. The same companies sell specialty tools to make it easy.

Example: Open a 1992 Toyota Camry: Rear driver side window. Use the 'z' tool, inserted 3 inches from the front at a 45 degree angle to a depth of 7 inches. Move latch forward.

There are many cases where thieves have learned the weakness of a particular model and become skilled enough that they can steal the car in about the same time as it takes you to drive it away.

The smart keys and engine immobilizers do sometimes encourage thieves to look at other cars that are less trouble. Having to replace or reprogram an Engine Control Unit is a big hassle. The ECU reprogramming is a process that deliberately takes many hours. Of course, if you are just stealing it for parts, that does not matter.

Dan

Evan
10-08-2010, 04:10 PM
The professional car thieves use tow trucks and dollies, not flat decks. The alarm tilt switch turns off the alarm when it is lifted at one end.

Most of the rest couldn't care less about special information on how to open or disable something. To get in they break the window with an automatic centre punch, makes almost no noise. Then they pop the hood and rip the wires off the noisemaker. How many people go running out to find out what is happening when they hear a car alarm???

If you want to keep your car from being stolen then hide a switch under the dash that cuts the power to the ignition or fuel pump. Also put a steering lock on it. Easily defeated with the right equipment but it discourages most thieves. They are lazy.

Tait
10-10-2010, 11:09 PM
Supposedly, dirty cars don't get stolen as much.

Ask a cop - apparently, dirty cars aren't as attractive as shiny clean ones.

Tait

Rustybolt
10-11-2010, 12:35 PM
Supposedly, dirty cars don't get stolen as much.

Ask a cop - apparently, dirty cars aren't as attractive as shiny clean ones.

Tait

Or rusty ones.

or ones what is full of junk

Or ones what their interior smell like nasty old farts.

Evan
10-11-2010, 02:27 PM
I have always figured that the best car alarm has teeth. That's why this guy used to ride with me for many years.

http://metalshopborealis.ca/pics/thor2.jpg

This one still does.

http://ixian.ca/pics7/likateeth.jpg

Roped1992
10-13-2016, 01:52 AM
It doesn't matter if it is true or not. Anyone who wants to learn where the alarm parts on a particular car are located just needs to rent one long enough to take the interior panels off and peek under the hood. (or, as suggested by Black_Moons, steal one with a flat bed)

The best theft deterrents are loud unique colors like Hot Pink and low performance low value models like the Saturn SL series. It also helps if the car has a GPS locator of some kind on board. Then you can find it in the event that it is stolen.

My advice, if you live where cars are frequently stolen, don't buy an expensive car: http://www.wordsiseek.com/expensive-cars/.

I agree with you but if you buy an insurance of you expensive car then there will be no problem at all. What do you think about this? Insurance does not cost much indeed but help you to save your assets.