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View Full Version : How should I move a Bridgeport w/Boss IV



KiloBravo
10-10-2010, 06:39 PM
I do not want to pay a rigger, so any other suggestions ?

The shop is about a foot higher than street level. The last time the owner sold one he said the guy backed a tilt trailer up to the floor and used a block and tackle to pull it onto the trailer. Seems reasonable but I am worried about it being top heavy. I know I can tilt the head to help alleviate that problem.

Also I am not sure how I would get it off the trailer at my house. I don't have a forklift or a hoist, just a 2 ton shop crane.

The second problem is my garage door is only 7ft so I don't think I could slide it through with out some type of dis assembly. So maybe I should just disassemble it on site and not have to worry about it tipping.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Kevin

Liger Zero
10-10-2010, 06:41 PM
Does it have the original controls? The original tape-drive? If so I'd move it with EXPLOSIVES or liquify it with THERMITE and recast it into something useful.

squirrel
10-10-2010, 06:46 PM
I second that, the old Boss control is not worth scrapping. You can buy a current CNC for a song and dance right now. Better hurry, when the administration changes in 2012 the prices will start going up.

Liger Zero
10-10-2010, 07:00 PM
I have two of them right now. Both of them I tried to run as-is, one I had professionally converted.

I could have had a new mill for the same price. I plan to scrap 'em both when I finish paying for the conversion.

KiloBravo
10-10-2010, 07:07 PM
I got it to convert to a more modern CNC. It has all the old controls which I will remove and put on servos or steppers and drivers and then hook it up to a PC running Mach 3. So for $2000 I have a pretty stout CNC mill for the price of a new Sherline. What's wrong with that ?

P.S. If I want this abuse I will post on PM. ;-)

P.S.S. Where are all the modern CNC machines going for a song a dance ? The cheapest I have seen with that envelope is $5000 and no tooling.

KiddZimaHater
10-10-2010, 07:17 PM
Where are all the modern CNC machines going for a song a dance
YEAH, No kidding.
Where can I find these mythical, inexpensive CNC's?

Toolguy
10-10-2010, 07:17 PM
I've moved everything in my shop except the CNC mill (6000 lb.) with an engine hoist. it works great for getting a machine off the trailer because the feet go under the trailer. Also, you are picking up the machine from the top which is a lot safer than trying to move it by the bottom. I raised mine up off the trailer, drove the trailer out from under the machine, then lowered the machine down on the legs with 2x8s while keeping some tension on the lift on top. At that point you can roll it wherever you want it.

Liger Zero
10-10-2010, 07:18 PM
So for $2000 I have a pretty stout CNC mill for the price of a new Sherline. What's wrong with that ?


As long as you know what you are getting into, that's all. ;)



P.S. If I want this abuse I will post on PM. ;-)


Whoa there friend, lets not hit below the belt. :eek:



P.S.S. Where are all the modern CNC machines going for a song a dance ? The cheapest I have seen with that envelope is $5000 and no tooling.

Your Old Dog has a back yard full of late model Haas machines, he runs them until the sump fills up with chips... then he tosses 'em and buys new. Offer him some fiber-glass rod he'll send you a couple of mills cheap. :D

rockrat
10-10-2010, 07:24 PM
I slid my Series 1 on pipe and across the floor without anything as well. Pipe makes it easy. Although, the series 1 has a large sheetmetal box on the side which can get in the way when using pipe, but its still possible.

They seem top heavy but they are not bad. YET, you still need to be careful and watch what you are doing.

If you have a truck and a trailer rated for that load, back up to the place and pull it onto the trailer. As for removing it, I backed my truck into the shop and ran a chainfall to just outside the opposite door with a beam that spanned the concrete.

I was able to pull it off a drop deck trailer without issues. Just watch and think through every move you make.

rock~

Edit - Here is a link to a drill press move I did a while back. This was a bit more top heavy than the mill. Drill press move (http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=33895) Please note, when I pull a machine off the trailer, the chain is around a very low point, this helps reduce the tipping. I have also lashed the top of many a machine to the truck and slowly worked them off a trailer. It takes more time because you have to let the top rigging out as the machine takes up the slack and it only helps against a tip over, it does not prevent a tip over.

rockrat
10-10-2010, 07:43 PM
Ok, one more thing and I'll stop for now. I just couldnt remember where I had the photos of this stuff.

Look over this link. I have photos and video of the day I moved a mill into the shop.

Rockrats mill move album (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v12/rockrat/bridgeport%20move/)

rock~

Metalmelter
10-10-2010, 07:44 PM
You'd be amazed what you can do with a backhoe and some stout chain or better yet straps. Get a friend with one or pay someone for a little time to lift and move it for you. ;)

KiloBravo
10-10-2010, 08:17 PM
Ok, one more thing and I'll stop for now. I just couldnt remember where I had the photos of this stuff.

Look over this link. I have photos and video of the day I moved a mill into the shop.

Rockrats mill move album (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v12/rockrat/bridgeport%20move/)

rock~

Rockrat, Thanks that is just what I needed to see.

A question, the floor of the guys shop is actually about a foot above the street. Can that trailer tilt with the jack on the front ? It looks like you can tilt to any angle with that. I would have to back it up to his floor and then pull it into the back of the trailer. Should be possible ?

Only problem with my garage is it has a 7 foot opening so I think the machine is closer to 8 feet. Hoe tall is your garage door opening ?

Thanks,
Kevin

Mcgyver
10-10-2010, 09:13 PM
rock, your text refers to the box on the side (cnc) but the pics look like a manual mill??

I think the series 1 cnc is bigger and heavier than the regular bridgeport, certainly taller. I've taken mine for walks lots of times, its a heavy one but doable doing the Egyptian (rollers and pry bars). A 1' drop is a big concern, might be worth having a forklift there....unless the trailer is the right height and you block underneath etc.....its a lot of machine and top heavy.

I had the same challenge getting mine in...the rigid ram means you're talking the top off - varispeed drive and pulleys. Basically start at the top and work your way down, On mine I had to drop the motor but not remove it...that should get you under 7'

rockrat
10-10-2010, 11:35 PM
rock, your text refers to the box on the side (cnc) but the pics look like a manual mill??

I should clear the air on that. I have one of each. The manual mill photos are of a recent move. I used the same trailer and rigging to move my series 1 cnc.

The trailer deck height? I dont know for sure but I bet it is very close to 1' if not a bit over.

1' can be dealt with. What I would do in that situation is take enough dunnage or cribbing with me so that I could back the trailer up onto a few wood planks. This will raise your trailer height and since most trailer decks are nearly 8"-10" off the ground you don't have far to go. 2 - 2x10's per side would be more than enough. Take enough that you can get some under the truck tires if needed to keep things level.

Place the 2" x 10" with the 10" flat on the ground and just behind the trailer tires. You will need a bag of sand on each board for the trailer to keep the board from moving as you back onto it.

If there are no sand bags, make the boards long enough that they touch the dock/building and still allow a few feet for the trailer to be on them.

I have done this numerous times with good success.

As for the height of the garage door at the home shop, 7' is about the limit so long as your machine is not a rigid head type. I tilted the head down on my machine to get it into the old shops 7' garage door. This was the first move without the drop trailer, thats why the forklift is there.


Click for larger photo.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v12/rockrat/new/th_DSC01639.jpg (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v12/rockrat/new/DSC01639.jpg)

rock~

rockrat
10-10-2010, 11:45 PM
Need to drop a trailer down a bit? Well, let the air out of the tires or.... dig a few holes.

I had dad help with a Van Norman. We needed to drop the trailer down a bit to get the machine off. We fired up the tiller and dug out holes to back the trailer tires into. Put the back end into the dirt and made moving the mill easy without a forklift.

Just make sure that the trailer will end up with the back side where you want it. Pulling it out without a 4x4 might be a challenge when the weight is still on there.

Click for larger photo.
http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y128/katiecat222/van%20norman/th_IMG_0760-1.jpg (http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y128/katiecat222/van%20norman/IMG_0760-1.jpg)

GKman
10-11-2010, 08:11 AM
If you have a truck and a trailer rated for that load, back up to the place and pull it onto the trailer.



...Back up to the place BLOCK UNDER THE BACK OF THE TRAILER and pull it on the trailer.

I stand an extended tape measure on end on the ground at the back bumper of my tow vehicle when loading so I can get the load in the right place on the trailer. Tows good if the bumper drops an inch or two under load. Whoa be those without enough tongue weight.

Cheaper than a rigger, a good sized skid loader with forks will lift a mill off a trailer. My Case 60XT lifted my Lugan OK.

rockrat
10-11-2010, 10:03 AM
...Back up to the place BLOCK UNDER THE BACK OF THE TRAILER and pull it on the trailer.

Fair enough, safety first. I lashed my trailer to the dock where I was doing the work (pickup end of the trip). Although, I also didn't add that you should never put your hand or foot under the machine as it is being moved. In fact, I didnt state an enormous number of items and procedures that will need to be followed. We cant list every issue for this move, mainly because we are not there amd cant be expected to imagine every possible issue from miles away.

Let us remember that we are not giving perfect and exact step by step directions for moving every machine. We are giving examples from our experiences. Every machine move is different and must be examined as such. Safety must be followed and every move should be scrutinized to reduce the possibility of injury.

rock~

Toolguy
10-11-2010, 10:34 AM
Always remember when loading a trailer - you need more weight toward the tow vehicle ahead of the trailer wheels. If there is more weight behind the wheels the trailer will want to fishtail. More weight ahead of the wheels (or balance point in the case of multiple axles) the trailer will tend to pull straight and not fishtail. Some people want to put the machine to the back to make it easier to get off at arrival. This can cause a bad accident on the road.

snowman
10-11-2010, 12:00 PM
If you've never moved a large machine before, you hire a rigger, nuff said. Doesn' tmatter if you don't want to do it or not, you are moving a difficult machine for your first machine.

If it were me, I'd either air down or jack up the trailer so that the end of it met the height of the garage and just push her off.

metalmagpie
10-11-2010, 12:36 PM
How did you get it into your shop? Why not do the same thing now?

KiloBravo
10-11-2010, 03:38 PM
The owners Dad bought it new in 1977 and it has not been removed from the shop since then. I moved my B&S No. 2 Surface Grinder by myself which is probably the heaviest piece of equipment I own, maybe 1400 lbs with the electric motor.

The owner says according to the manual it weighs in at 2950 lbs. The trailer holds 4500 pounds and the dual axle version holds 6600 pounds. They are the same price for rental so I will probably get the bigger one.

I have a 4wd Durango with the 5.7L engine and towing package, so it should be fine with that weight.

Once I get it on the trailer it should be OK. I only have about a 30 mile drive to my house. Once at my house I can lower the deck and pull it off like Rockrat did. I appreciate the suggestions and advice.

Regards,
Kevin

KiloBravo
10-16-2010, 07:43 PM
Well, it was pretty uneventful. I rented a hydraulic trailer like the BilJax, it was made by Premco. It took us about two minutes to slide it from his shop floor to the deck of the trailer then an hour to strap it down.

When I got home, I was just able to get the deck lip in my garage. I tilted the head forward and winched it off onto the garage floor, where it is sitting now.

I even had time to take the kids on a Hayride to the Pumpkin patch :-)

A few pictures, The mill was purchased new in 197? for $33K by the owners Dad.

I got the mill with all the Erickson tooling, a BP Vise and the original Maintenance and Programming Manuals.

A few pics of the stuff in my garage.


http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4151/5087931710_92aee4c975_z.jpg


http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4110/5087903072_08c7e192ab_z.jpg


http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4104/5087903082_b0c8b5f0c1.jpg

rockrat
10-16-2010, 10:16 PM
Nice score and tooling too! She looks funny with the head nodded down.

Was that a punch tape or old rs232? I cant remember if you said and I'm too lazy to re-read the posts. :o

rock~