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Juergenwt
10-18-2010, 07:51 PM
Found this site. Try out the info on ISO tol. anf on threads.
http://calc.homepage.dk/indexeng.htm

oldtiffie
10-18-2010, 08:35 PM
Found this site. Try out the info on ISO tol. anf on threads.
http://calc.homepage.dk/indexeng.htm

Thanks Juergenwt.

That really is a very useful "find" - see:

http://calc.homepage.dk/metricthread.htm

I will be interested to see how many can, will, cannot or just won't use those types of tables when screw-cutting - but they should - as drilling and tapping tables are just not good enough for screw-cutting.

Ken_Shea
10-18-2010, 10:24 PM
Yes, excellent link, thank you!
OT, that may save me asking you on some of that geometry calculations :D

flathead4
10-18-2010, 10:27 PM
I use Machinery's Handbook when threading. It works even when the internet is not available. :)

Tom

oldtiffie
10-18-2010, 10:34 PM
So do I Tom.

But I suspect that the effort of using MHB will put many off in favour of a "canned" solution the web.

oldtiffie
10-18-2010, 10:36 PM
Yes, excellent link, thank you!
OT, that may save me asking you on some of that geometry calculations :D

Yep - its a "goodie" Ken.

I don't mind helping at all - stops the grey (UK, OZ but "gray" in the US) matter from going rusty.

flathead4
10-18-2010, 10:45 PM
But I suspect that the effort of using MHB will put many off in favour of a "canned" solution the web.

Reading the tiny text in my copy of MHB is sometimes challenging. The last time in those tables I had to get a magnifier. Either need new glasses or larger text version.


Tom

Ken_Shea
10-18-2010, 10:52 PM
I still have not got that MHB I promised my self this year, do use ME Consultant Pro which has all the thread data and specifications one could ever need and then print that out in a very easily readable form to take to the lathe or mill.

flathead4
10-19-2010, 05:57 AM
Printing the page would be nice. MHB CD version offers that but it's ~100 bucks.

Tom

MuellerNick
10-19-2010, 07:33 AM
Found this site. Try out the info on ISO tol. anf on threads.

The SI-unit conversion page (http://calc.homepage.dk/siunit1.htm) is completely nuts.
I never have seen such a nonsense.

If I remember correctly, that site was linked in PM. After I complained, I was attacked. Now he corrected at least the unit conversion. But still, I see the unit "kgf". What a nonsense!


Nick

oldtiffie
10-19-2010, 07:56 AM
Seems you are right as regards it not being an SI unit Nick.


The kilogram-force has never been a part of the International System of Units (SI), which was introduced in 1960. The SI unit of force is the newton.

From:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kgf

MuellerNick
10-19-2010, 08:42 AM
Even the wiki is full of nonsense:

It starts with this:
"The SI unit of force is the newton"

It is Newton, not newton. Sir Isaak Newton.

And on ...
"Prior to this, the unit was widely used in much of the world; it is still in use for some purposes. The thrust of a rocket engine, for example, was measured in kilograms-force in 1940s Germany, ..."

No, they worked in kg, not kg force.

"... and it is still used today ... sometimes by the European Space Agency."
I bet not! Maybe for trivia going to the public.

"... for torque measured in "meter-kilograms", for pressure in kilograms per square centimeter, ..."
No, torque is Nm. Pressure once was kg/cm², then kp/cm² and now is Pa or bar.

"and to define the "metric horsepower" (PS) as 75 metre-kiloponds per second."
kilopond doesn't exist. PS is defined in kW. Furthermore, PS is no longer allowed (but keeps staying).


Nick