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BigBoy1
10-19-2010, 10:59 AM
I just purchased a new Wilton 8201 bandsaw and got the rip-fence for the saw. After setting up the machine and installing the rip-fence, noticed that the bottom of the fence was about 1/2" above the top of the table.

http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t308/i422twains/s4.jpg
http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t308/i422twains/s2.jpg

I called the company asked it there was some adjustment that can be made to lower the fence for cutting material less than 1/2". They said that was the saw was made and nothing can be done about it. The only way I can see to fill the gap is to bolt (I don't do welding.) a spacer to the bottom of the fence to make the bottom of the rip-fence flush with the table top. It just frosts me that new equipment can't be correct from the factory. You are forced to modify it to make it work.

madman
10-19-2010, 11:03 AM
Piece of Nylon UHMW or puck board and cut to fit size of fence and fasten it on. Or if cutting 1/2 inch wood just c- clamp on a piece of material sized to the Fence for the thin stuff??

A.K. Boomer
10-19-2010, 11:17 AM
That's insane, its like the things an afterthought --------- what about a series of small rollers at the bottom to fill in the gap? depends what the underneath looks like for attaching but could be an option...

I do like the UHMW idea as the stuff is durable and pretty friction free...

rockrat
10-19-2010, 12:01 PM
It looks as though the rip fence is attached to a bracket that in turn bolts onto the table (2nd photo). Can you slot the holes that the bolts go through before it attaches to the table?

I do agree that Wilton didn't meet the mark with that product the way it is.

rock~

mike os
10-19-2010, 12:29 PM
nice piece of design work there:mad:

Your Old Dog
10-19-2010, 12:44 PM
Nothing wrong with the design. I have that same kind of fence on my cabinet saw. Even though the aluminum is anodized it still is sticky when you feed stock through it. And there is no heigth it could be set at that wouldn't occasionally be to high for the stock being fed through it. Madman is right UHMW is the way to go. If you wanted to slot the HUMW and put two bolts in the fence it could be made to be self leveling on the table. Keep in mind, that fence is a tool and not an art work so don't be afraid to customize it for your own special needs.

I made a fence out of Corian counter top material for my bandsaw.

PS: After a second look, it appears you may be able to slot the mounting screws or even make a new mount for it and have the best of both worlds. You might be able to set it flush no matter what?

RobbieKnobbie
10-19-2010, 01:08 PM
Yeah, a slab of UHMW (available from most woodworking stores) is the hot ticket. Screw it to the side of the fence and never look back.

I did that on my tablesaw and was delighted with the change.

mike os
10-19-2010, 01:49 PM
you think.... glad its not made in the far east or I can already imagine the comments it would draw.:confused:

That is the worst design for a bandsaw fence I have seen in 40 years, I do not expect to buy supposedly decent kit and then have to modify it to make it fit for purpose. if it needs a strip face or spacer it should come supplied and fitted.... unless it is a right mickey mouse outfit.....

Bill Pace
10-19-2010, 02:12 PM
I had a Taiwan 16" wood band and the supplied fence had about a 1/4" gap that appeared to be designed in. However, the fence was soon discarded as being near useless, at least in cutting wood. I bought the saw primarily for re-sawing rough cut slabs. and soon found that after 2-3 cuts the blade would not cut straight with out 'canting' the piece to follow the line. After building several jigs from different web sites/magazines - and a couple of my own - I found I could get the best cut with just free handing.

RichardG
10-19-2010, 03:29 PM
If you really want it to set down on the table why not just take off the fence and machine down the casting the fence bolts to can't tell to good from the pics but looks possible. Still a bummer that you would have to do that.
Richard

japcas
10-19-2010, 04:00 PM
I have had the 8201 wilton saw for about 2.5 years now. I have the rip fence for it also so I ran downstairs to check the gap on mine. It's right at 1/8 of an inch. Are you sure you have it mounted correctly? If you want I could probably take a few pictures of mine and post them if it would help.

P.S. It comes in pretty handy at times and with the camlock clamp it's easy to move it out of the way when you need to do some freehand sawing.

JoeLee
10-19-2010, 04:17 PM
I haven't read all the posts, but my first thought would be to elongate the holes in the bar that bolts to the table edge, thus allowing the entire mount to sit lower. I don't know whats in the front but I assume it's similar. You may have to replace the bar with a wider piece. Mounting something under the fence wouldn't fly with me.

JL........................

BigBoy1
10-20-2010, 01:38 PM
If you really want it to set down on the table why not just take off the fence and machine down the casting the fence bolts to can't tell to good from the pics but looks possible. Still a bummer that you would have to do that.
Richard

Richard,

That was to be my first choice to solve the problem - machining down the black metal casting, but it is hollow with only a wall thichness of 1/4" so taking it down the 1/2" is a no go.

BigBoy1
10-20-2010, 01:42 PM
I have had the 8201 wilton saw for about 2.5 years now. I have the rip fence for it also so I ran downstairs to check the gap on mine. It's right at 1/8 of an inch. Are you sure you have it mounted correctly? If you want I could probably take a few pictures of mine and post them if it would help.

P.S. It comes in pretty handy at times and with the camlock clamp it's easy to move it out of the way when you need to do some freehand sawing.

There is only one way the fence can go together and that way produces the 1/2" gap. I agree that with the cam-lock, it will be be handy but only for big material!

BigBoy1
10-20-2010, 01:49 PM
I haven't read all the posts, but my first thought would be to elongate the holes in the bar that bolts to the table edge, thus allowing the entire mount to sit lower. I don't know whats in the front but I assume it's similar. You may have to replace the bar with a wider piece. Mounting something under the fence wouldn't fly with me.

JL........................


I considered this option but there is not sufficient material in the bar that attaches to the table to be able to enlongate the holes the 1/2" needed.

However, that gives me an idea of looking at making a bracket which will bolt into the existing holes in the table but have a place to remount the rip-fence bar at a lower position.

BigBoy1
10-20-2010, 02:00 PM
Piece of Nylon UHMW or puck board and cut to fit size of fence and fasten it on. Or if cutting 1/2 inch wood just c- clamp on a piece of material sized to the Fence for the thin stuff??

I like the idea of making a spacer of UHMW but my only concern is how it will work when sawing thin (1/8" or less) metal sheets. I'm thinking the material will "grab" into the softer UHMW material and cause binding as it cuts.

lugnut
10-20-2010, 02:05 PM
Bill here are a couple of photos of the fence on my elcheepo Craftsman table saw. There was too much gap between the fence and the table so I screwed on a strip of 1" thick Poly. It not only puts the fence down onto the table, but also gives you protection so you won't put the blade into the fence while sawing. I like it when I use my dado blade, I can run the blade up against the fence and not hurt either.
Mel
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v671/lugnut/Tablesawfence.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v671/lugnut/tablesawfence2.jpg

gnm109
10-20-2010, 03:40 PM
I have a 1972 Delta-Rockwell 10" Contractor's saw with a 2 hp motor. The rip fence has about 1/8" gap above the table. It will let 1/8" stock slip under the rip fence.

When I cut thin material, I just clamp a piece of metal to the rip fence to cover the gap all the way to the surface of the table. I could probably screw something permanent on there but I never bothered.

1/2" is just way too high, however.

japcas
10-20-2010, 05:21 PM
Bigboy, I just went down and looked at my saw again. On the "front" of my table, front being the side you feed the stock through, there is two sets of holes. My fence bracket is bolted to the bottom set of holes. On the back side of the table there is only 1 set of holes. And as I said earlier the gap is only about 1/8 of an inch from the bottom of the fence to the table top.

I looked at the bolt pattern on the bottom of the table and it appears that it could be turned 180 degrees and still work. Is there any chance you have the table mounted backwards? When I'm facing the table and the blade, the split in the table that you put the blade through is on the right side. What side is it on your saw?

gwilson
10-20-2010, 07:54 PM
What makes you think the Wilton isn't made in the Far East? My Wilton square wheel grinder is,and it costs money like it was made in USA. I had to turn the 10" drive wheel true when I first got it.

I bought a Wilton/Jet clone of the Roll In bandsaw a few years ago where I worked. I had to get the motor cord's position changed. It was rubbing against the motor pulley from the factory,and was within a hair of all the way to the bare wire. It wasn't too cheap,either. Glad my home shop has a real Roll In.

Wilton has been milking the name like crazy,overcharging for everything,in my opinion.

JoeLee
10-20-2010, 08:36 PM
Wilton has been milking the name like crazy,overcharging for everything,in my opinion.

I have a Wilton precision tool makers vise and a V-block set. All made in India. Altough, hardened and accurately ground.

JL..............

gwilson
10-20-2010, 08:40 PM
I had a Wilton 12' disc/6" belt sander at the shop,I practically gave it away,so miserable a tracking device it had.

Tony Ennis
10-20-2010, 08:53 PM
What a curious design. Looks like a fence for a different saw.

kf2qd
10-20-2010, 10:28 PM
A better setup for resaw work is a vertical knifw edge guide parallel with the front edge of the blade. It keeps your work parallel to the blade but lets you adjust the feed angle so you can cut where you want to rather than where teh blade wants to. Take a piece of wood about 5" long and bevel both sides at 45 degrees forming a corner. Fasten this to another piece so the corner you just made is perpendicular the the second board. Clamp this assembly to the table so this corner you created is about even with the front edge of the blade and the correct spacing from the blade for the thickness you want to rip. Works great and is a whole lot easier than a fence on a bandsaw.

JoeLee
10-20-2010, 11:41 PM
What a curious design. Looks like a fence for a different saw.

I was looking at an ad for that bandsaw the other day. The ad shows it with the optional fence mounted and you could see right under it.
Manufacturers defect, poor engineering etc. etc.

JL..................

macona
10-21-2010, 01:14 AM
Wrong thread

BillDaCatt
10-21-2010, 03:14 AM
Wilton, Jet, Powermatic, and Performax are all under the same corporate roof of WMH; or as they are called now: Walter Meier. Walter Meier, a Swiss company, acquired all of these brands in 2002 when they merged with Wilton and Jet. I don't know where they build their stuff today, but you can bet it isn't in North America.

From the Walter Meier website (http://www.waltermeier.com/ch/group/en/media_corner.html):

"Increase in the EBIT margin from 2.9 to 4.8 percent, largely as a consequence of the successful restructuring of the manufacturing business in North America"

I don't know what that really means, but since they are talking about saving money I'm going to assume that they mean they no longer have as many employees in North America as they did last year.

I doubt the saw was made in the United States and I don't think it was made in Switzerland either.

(end rant)

Double-check the mounting of the fence rails. There might be a bracket installed improperly or a bolt in the wrong hole that is giving you the extra height. The fence on my (imported) Grizzly 17" band saw will only allow a sheet or two of paper to slip under the fence now but the gap was much larger when I first installed it.

BigBoy1
10-21-2010, 08:30 AM
Last night I was busy. I measured the gap and disassemblied the fence. The table top was mounted correctly so what I did was to drill and tap two holes in the table top below the original holes and lowered the whole fence. The fence is now flush with the table.

The saw was made in Tawian as the box containing it had big "Product of Tawian" labels on the outside of the box. Another American name made in Asia!


http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t308/i422twains/PICT0308.jpg

mike os
10-21-2010, 08:38 AM
that looks a lot more like it:D

JoeLee
10-21-2010, 08:50 AM
Nice job!! That was a quick easy fix. Glad it all worked out.

JL.............

gwilson
10-21-2010, 09:17 AM
Told you it was,and has been made in Asia at least since the 80's,as far as I can tell. Too bad you probably paid a premium price for the name.

gnm109
10-21-2010, 10:22 AM
That's an excellent fix for a design issue. I may do the same on my Delta saw to get rid of that last 1/8".

The only thing wrong with your saw now is that it has no scratches, no chips and it's new. :)

BigBoy1
10-21-2010, 06:52 PM
The only thing wrong with your saw now is that it has no scratches, no chips and it's new. :)

With the list of projects I have, the newness will shortly be gone!

Your Old Dog
10-21-2010, 07:30 PM
Last night I was busy. I measured the gap and disassemblied the fence. The table top was mounted correctly so what I did was to drill and tap two holes in the table top below the original holes and lowered the whole fence. The fence is now flush with the table............................


Great, so you didn't have to slot it as I suggested in post #6 but was able to just drill two more holes. You got lucky.

steverice
10-21-2010, 07:39 PM
You guys realize that you have spent four pages talking about wood.

Toolguy
10-21-2010, 07:58 PM
The machine to cut it is metal!:)

GKman
10-21-2010, 10:53 PM
Let me know what you can rip with your ripfence on a band saw. My experience is that band saw blade teeth are never set exactly the same on the left and right sides therefore you can't feed parallel to the blade. I've held the work what looked like 10* or so to rip a straight line. If I'm re-sawing tall, thin stock, I use a guide clamped on the table. It's as tall as the work, and is in effect a fence of zero length located beside the teeth of the blade. As the grain tries to pull the blade away from the intended cut the user can steer the work pivoting on this guide and maintain a straight cut.

JoeLee
10-21-2010, 10:56 PM
You guys realize that you have spent four pages talking about wood.

It could be used as a metal working bandsaw too you know!!!

JL.....................

gnm109
10-21-2010, 11:14 PM
Let me know what you can rip with your ripfence on a band saw. My experience is that band saw blade teeth are never set exactly the same on the left and right sides therefore you can't feed parallel to the blade. I've held the work what looked like 10* or so to rip a straight line. If I'm re-sawing tall, thin stock, I use a guide clamped on the table. It's as tall as the work, and is in effect a fence of zero length located beside the teeth of the blade. As the grain tries to pull the blade away from the intended cut the user can steer the work pivoting on this guide and maintain a straight cut.


I use a 3/4 skip tooth blade on my bandsaw for resawing. I also use a full length guide that I built. I have a 5" riser kit and that enables me to resaw a full 10" wide wood. I did that quite a bit when I was building and repairing guitars.

You do have to steer the wood as you say.

BigBoy1
10-22-2010, 03:43 PM
The machine to cut it is metal!:)


The band saw will cut wood but my main reason for getting it was to cut metal with it. I doubt if I'll ever do any wood resawing. I intend to use the rip fence as a guide for cutting metal sheets/plate into smaller pieces/section for their use in other projects.