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mike os
11-07-2010, 02:16 PM
What are your thoughts on using a light oil such as WD40 as a lathe coolant over the winter? (mainly becasue it wont freeze )
My concern is the normal water diluted stuff freezing and damaging the pump etc.

squirrel
11-07-2010, 03:44 PM
What are your thoughts on using a light oil such as WD40 as a lathe coolant over the winter? (mainly becasue it wont freeze )
My concern is the normal water diluted stuff freezing and damaging the pump etc.
Its flammable!! Antifreeze and water will work fine for coolant or buy waterbased coolant and add water.

mike os
11-07-2010, 03:52 PM
Thought about antifreeze, but wondered if it would lead to corrosion issues? (and whether it would be compatible with cutting emulsions)

flamability is only an issue if it gets hot enough or there is an ignition source?

I would not expect normal cutting operations to generate those kind of conditions unless used in a mister....?

Boucher
11-07-2010, 04:01 PM
I was told that a lot of old gunsmiths used straight light mineral oil. I got some Almag which is a light mineral cutting oil made by Texaco. I have used it for two different periods of time. It works great but it is so messy that I gave up on it. Nothing in the shop rusts because everything has oil on it. I now use the soluable oil for flood applications but really prefer the old acid brush and some good dark cutting oil. My shop is heated so there is not a freezing problem.

macona
11-07-2010, 04:04 PM
I wont use anything water based in my lathe. Tried once and never again. I now use only mineral based.

One that looks good is Hangsterfers Hard Cut 5418

http://www.hangsterfers.com/cutting_oils.asp

mike os
11-07-2010, 04:05 PM
normally I would use a soluble.... its the freezing that worries me:)

derekm
11-07-2010, 04:21 PM
I have a central soluble flood coolant system, where I can just take the pump out easily. However, the design of the shop ( heavily insulated, double glazed equator facing windows, concrete raft over pool containing 30 tons of water ) means it isnt going freeze unless something weird happens to the weather, (e.g. -20c for a month, does not happen here very often even though we are 50 Deg north, good ole North atlantic drift!) Just insulate the tank and put in a fish tank heater set to 10C on its internal thermostat powered via an thermostat in shop set to 5C

jugs
11-07-2010, 04:25 PM
normally I would use a soluble.... its the freezing that worries me:)

Hi mike,
The addition of soluble to water acts like an antifreeze & lowers its freezing point, sorry I dont know what that is, I suspect -8C ish:confused: , put some in the freezer -18 then check what it melts @ (dont mistake it for icecream :D )& let us know.

john
:)

mike os
11-07-2010, 05:50 PM
good idea John.....:)

J Tiers
11-07-2010, 08:37 PM
WD has its uses. It is pretty good for aluminum....

of course I have heard a lot of others also, alcohol, kerosene, and more for aluminum. Only tried WD, it does work for that.

And its a darn good wasp killer.

Stuff with a low ignition point is not so good. With heavier oil, I often get smoke with some lathe operations (not typically aluminum), and I suppose there might be more than smoke with a lighter oil or solvent.

mike os
11-08-2010, 01:49 AM
Kerosene.... did think about it....:)

ligito
12-02-2010, 02:31 PM
I sprayed the wasp nest on my driveway with WD40.
3 days later, I kicked it across the driveway.
Later in the day, while sitting at my computer, I felt what I thought was gravel inside my pant leg.
I stood up, shook my pants and a very sedate wasp fell out.
I still don't understand how it got up my leg.

Liger Zero
12-02-2010, 02:48 PM
I use a chloronated solvent for a mold cleaner. Sparingly, as the stuff has all kinds of OMG YOU ARE GOING TO DIEEEEEE!!! warnings on it.

Remember working at The Place With The Windmill back before he went tree-hugger... and before the big expansion went up. We'd get cecropia-type moths in from the woodland out back. They were utterly harmless aside from casting shadows everwhere (BIG moth) and crashing into things/people and landing in food.

A quick spritz with the mold cleaner and they'd fall right out of the air, dead. Perfectly preserved, wings fully extended.

For awhile I me a male and female Cecropia, a big Polythymus (spelling) moth and a Luna moth all in a display case, but over time they decayed.

I prefer to catch large bugs and redirect them out of harms way now, rather than destroy them.

Dr Stan
12-02-2010, 05:04 PM
Kerosene.... did think about it....:)

One place I worked used a 50-50 mix of kerosene and mineral lard oil in one machine. The guy running it smoked and would toss his butts into the machine. :eek: Never caught on fire while I was there.

garagemark
12-02-2010, 05:32 PM
What's the deal with antifreeze? Today's modern ethylene glycol has superior corrosion inhibiting agents. That's why you no longer need to change your modern automobile coolant for years and years. I do not dilute it with water at all. It's slicker than snot in full form. Used it for a couple of years now in an unheated garage (heated only when I'm in it). Love it.

SGW
12-02-2010, 07:40 PM
One caveat: if you use some kind of oil, be careful not to breathe the smoke if the work gets hot enough to cause smoking. I was turning some aluminum years ago using kerosene as a lubricant. The lathe was chugging right along, I was applying kerosene with a brush ahead of the toolbit, chips were curling off in a cloud of smoke...and after doing this for about half an hour, I was suddenly aware that I had one god-awful headache and felt a bit woozy. I am sure that breathing the kerosene smoke was Not A Good Thing To Do.

gnm109
12-02-2010, 08:26 PM
What's the deal with antifreeze? Today's modern ethylene glycol has superior corrosion inhibiting agents. That's why you no longer need to change your modern automobile coolant for years and years. I do not dilute it with water at all. It's slicker than snot in full form. Used it for a couple of years now in an unheated garage (heated only when I'm in it). Love it.


Nothing wrong with antifreeze at all. I've used it for coolant in a Bernard cooler for my TIG...not a problem. I like Dex Cool. IIRC, it says "no phosphates" on the jug.

loose nut
12-03-2010, 06:39 PM
Nothing wrong with antifreeze at all. I've used it for coolant in a Bernard cooler for my TIG...not a problem. I like Dex Cool. IIRC, it says "no phosphates" on the jug.


We used to do that at work but eventually the hoses will plug off and over heat and burst. Something in the antifreeze is the problem. Methanol and water works without this problem.

gnm109
12-03-2010, 07:34 PM
We used to do that at work but eventually the hoses will plug off and over heat and burst. Something in the antifreeze is the problem. Methanol and water works without this problem.


Nope. Never had a single problem. Ran Dex Cool GM antifreeze straight for ten years. That's not ever going to happen.

So far since 1992, I've used:

1. Dex cool Antifreeze.
2. Tap Water. (through a sink, same way they did it at the welding school I attended.)
3. Distilled Water.
4. Pure Miller Coolant ($20 a gallon!!!! Boy was that a waste of money!!!)
5. 50/50 Miller Coolant. ( another waste.)
5. Soluble oil and water. (cheap and it works)


They're all the same to me. Can't tell the difference. By the way, I'm using the same Weldcraft torch that I started with in 1995. I do add a little lysol to kill the Algae, but otherwise, I could run any of the above.

Go figure.