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View Full Version : 25000 lbs later domestic bliss achieved, a tale of triumph



Mcgyver
11-27-2010, 11:45 AM
One of the great parts about the hobby is there are very few 'jobs around the house' suited to a mill. We're not pestered to build crappy bookshelves like the woodworkers.

That all changed this week with a busted dryer. Terrible high frequency squeaks and squeals, something had to be done. Tear it down and the culprits a pooched idle pulley bearing. It rides on a steel shaft, not sure what material it is but its magnetic...steel would seem a bad choice and cast iron you'd think would have been more trouble than an oilite.

After 15 years at this and 25,000 lbs of iron in the garage, its time to do something useful!

http://i785.photobucket.com/albums/yy132/michael01000/DSC_6359-medium.jpg

I keep a stock of bronze and oilite just for such occasions. I buy them long and with a larger than typical OD so i can turn them to suit. I had one that would work, and also a nice little internal mandrel i made years ago

http://i785.photobucket.com/albums/yy132/michael01000/DSC_6362-medium.jpg

Onto the lathe, all set to turn.....

http://i785.photobucket.com/albums/yy132/michael01000/DSC_6366-medium.jpg

oh no! the lathe is pooched! DSG not working and the dryer, in pieces takes a temporary back seat. @#$@ $^%&^$#* #$%#^%. DSG more complicated than i thought. Needing to get the drying going, I head to the bearing store; I'll just buy the damn thing, press it in and be done with it.

Ya think anyone stocks 9/16 OD sintered bearings? More bad language and a wasted trip.

dockrat
11-27-2010, 11:49 AM
Well so much for triumph and domestic bliss :( Nice try tho lol

Liger Zero
11-27-2010, 11:51 AM
Back up, what is DSG?

Mcgyver
11-27-2010, 11:52 AM
Get home, load the mandrel in the mill and have it. The bit in the pic quickly got swapped out - to broad an area of cut. That mandrel was only in contact with a fraction of the work and the increased force of a wide chip caused deflection. A more pointed tool and i got the part to a thou end to end. Maybe a bit of deflection? may the quill is less than perfect? More than good enough for this job. A good reminder that bore head work isn't going to perfect either.

http://i785.photobucket.com/albums/yy132/michael01000/DSC_6390-medium.jpg

cleaned it up, burr wise, and pressed the new bearing in. polished up the shaft a bit and the dryer is together and working.

http://i785.photobucket.com/albums/yy132/michael01000/DSC_6394-medium.jpg

Now I know this is absolutely child's play for 99% of you here.......but for 99% of the other folks I know this is magic and why to them the nickname Mcgyver works. The whole scenario just struck me as slightly amusing, :D .

Mcgyver
11-27-2010, 11:55 AM
DSG is my big lathe, Dean Smith & Grace....currently it would seem in need of a new motor. which btw is a challenging and heavy duty task that will no doubt capture the crowd here, but will not even register on the domestic interest scale.....unlike that bushing that made me a hero (for a moment) :D

Liger Zero
11-27-2010, 11:58 AM
See my wife would be right out there with me helping. :p

I don't mean "supervising" I mean actually helping.

Paul Alciatore
11-27-2010, 12:00 PM
You earned your nickname.

dockrat
11-27-2010, 12:00 PM
Whoops...I must have posted while you were posting the second lot of pics. Nice recovery. I can't begin to count how many things I have fixed around the house by having a mill and lathe. It "almost" justifies the expense of having them LOL

A.K. Boomer
11-27-2010, 12:02 PM
Where there's a Mill there's a way;)

lazlo
11-27-2010, 12:28 PM
Nice job Mike -- turning in the mill :)


Ya think anyone stocks 9/16 OD sintered bearings?

I have some. Oh, wait... :D

By the way, MSC stocks a really nice Oillite maintenance kit that has just about every size by 16th's. It's pretty reasonably priced (around $40), and the full 30% discount applies when they're running coupons.

Optics Curmudgeon
11-27-2010, 12:42 PM
Just FYI, the magnetic stuff is Super Oilite, just like the bronze version but mostly iron instead. Common in printers, motor bearings, etc.

Joe

millwrong
11-27-2010, 12:45 PM
Why is it that we proudly stick out our chests, stating "there!", when we just spent time-gas-excessive cash on a dryer that probably should be replaced? And do our "beloveds" actually believe our bullcrap about our brilliance?:confused: Or, are they letting us think we have the upper hand? I sometimes wonder if we all aren't potential actors/con-men!!!:eek:

lazlo
11-27-2010, 12:46 PM
Just FYI, the magnetic stuff is Super Oilite, just like the bronze version but mostly iron instead. Common in printers, motor bearings, etc.

I thought Super Oilite was simply sintered iron? It's rated for lower speeds but higher loads.

Is there such a thing as magnetic Oilite? What's the purpose?

lazlo
11-27-2010, 12:47 PM
Why is it that we proudly stick out our chests, stating "there!", when we just spent time-gas-excessive cash on a dryer that probably should be replaced?

Yah, looking at that pulley, my first thought was the rest of the machine is probably due for replacement :)

Carld
11-27-2010, 12:57 PM
So what if it falls apart next week, fixing it now may get you a little special companionship that night. ;)

lazlo
11-27-2010, 12:59 PM
So what if it falls apart next week, fixing it now may get you a little special companionship that night. ;)

Holy cow, I never thought about asking for "payment in kind"! Bloody brilliant!

I fixed the ice maker on the refrigerator last week (had to machine a replacement dog driver) -- I should ask for retroactive compensation! :D

polepenhollow
11-27-2010, 01:11 PM
I have no idea how other people get anything done or repaired around the house without a lathe, mill, bandsaw or surface grinder.
How can any person function without a drill press is totally amazing.
K Lively

Guido
11-27-2010, 01:13 PM
Idler in wifey's dryer failed at less than two years, motor three years. Homeshop repairs still running, eight years strong. Damned Maytag stuff.

--G

Optics Curmudgeon
11-27-2010, 01:16 PM
Super Oilite is sintered, just like the bronze version, it's 80% iron and 20% copper instead. Used for high wear applications, as you said, the drawback is that it wears the shaft faster.

Joe

wierdscience
11-27-2010, 02:08 PM
Better watch it,the Maytag man will have you in his cross hairs:D

snowman
11-27-2010, 02:35 PM
Yah, looking at that pulley, my first thought was the rest of the machine is probably due for replacement :)

I wholeheartedly disagree...much to the dismay of my wife.

With the advent of Ebay, you can find almost any part in a large appliance for a reasonable price. Just this last week I replaced the ignitor in my dryer. Next will be the felt seals and the timer. Total invested will be less than $100, and it'll work good for another few years.

Uncle O
11-27-2010, 04:46 PM
My buddy has a newer dryer and it breaks often. The real *isser is that its stuff he cant fix...burnt boards, circuits....these older dryer/washing machines are more mechanical and it is easy to go out to the garage and fab/machine something up.

John Stevenson
11-27-2010, 05:12 PM
Yup just spent a pleasant evening fixing the vacuum cleaner.
It was touch and go whether to bother or just buy a new one but I wasn't doing anything else so I though I'd have a look.

Lets face it I repair things for a living, 3 workshop full of machines, tools and materials we MUST be able to do it.

Well 1 hour later and three turns of duct tape round the motor rubber because it has shrunk and allowed the motor to slip in the cradle, back up and running.

No workshop was harmed in the repair of this cleaner and no expensive materials used.

SGW
11-27-2010, 06:44 PM
I have no idea how other people get anything done or repaired around the house without a lathe, mill, bandsaw or surface grinder.
How can any person function without a drill press is totally amazing.
K Lively

You got it!

Ken_Shea
11-27-2010, 07:14 PM
Nice fix Mcgyver!

My wife thinks I can fix anything and won't take over 15 minutes no matter what, have spent 25 + years trying to teach her otherwise but she won't learn, or perhaps it's not her at all :confused:


Say.... is that a Jacob 500 series Rubber-flex chuck?

Got a spare J508 :D

macona
11-27-2010, 07:19 PM
I have no idea how other people get anything done or repaired around the house without a lathe, mill, bandsaw or surface grinder.
How can any person function without a drill press is totally amazing.
K Lively

All but the surface grinder. That has been the least used space-take in the shop. Nice to have when you need it but something I could have lived without.

Bill736
11-27-2010, 08:18 PM
Good job on that dryer repair ! If you were able to repair it faster than obtaining a new roller assembly, then you are the hero ! ( Total expenses are not an issue, or course.)
A lamp on my bench suffered a burned up switch the other night. It's the type with a rotary knob on top of the bulb socket. I very calmly went to my
"electrical stuff" cabinet, found two used switches in stock, and installed one within about 20 minutes. I feel that this experience alone fully justifies all of the time I recently spent sorting and organizing dozens of boxes of auction and yard sale junk I've stored for decades ! Well, maybe.

whitis
11-27-2010, 08:46 PM
Why is it that we proudly stick out our chests, stating "there!", when we just spent time-gas-excessive cash on a dryer that probably should be replaced?

Replacing can be a risky proposition these days. This dryer lasted 15 years, so far. New ones don't. Life expectancy of new appliances has been plummeting.

For example:


Idler in wifey's dryer failed at less than two years, motor three years. Homeshop repairs still running, eight years strong. Damned Maytag stuff.


Here is a thread from a year ago:
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=36605

lazlo
11-27-2010, 09:56 PM
All but the surface grinder. That has been the least used space-take in the shop. Nice to have when you need it but something I could have lived without.

Wow, I'm just the opposite -- since I've gotten my surface grinder, I've been using it all the time. It's really nice to be able to grind a perfect reference surface on just about anything. Makes a great ultra-precision chop saw too.

PSD KEN
11-27-2010, 11:19 PM
To add to the list of needed household tools I would add welder(s) and torches.

If the offending item will not re-calibrate with your best hammer then a bit of flame will help!

Paul Alciatore
11-28-2010, 12:23 AM
Better watch it,the Maytag man will have you in his cross hairs:D

Never happen. The Maytag Man is too da## busy to have time to do ill to anyone.

Paul Alciatore
11-28-2010, 12:33 AM
Replacing can be a risky proposition these days. This dryer lasted 15 years, so far. New ones don't. Life expectancy of new appliances has been plummeting.

For example:


Here is a thread from a year ago:
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=36605

I can't agree more. The dishwasher in my house looked old and used 20 years ago when we bought the place. So far, zero repairs. I just had a 20+ year refrigerator repaired for under $200. It will probably go another 10 at least, perhaps 20. Washer and dryer are also 20+ and going strong: I can't remember if or when they needed repairs. I think I did replace a solenoid valve on the washer once.

Brands like GE and Whirlpool.

I really fear replacing them.