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rws
11-28-2010, 06:30 AM
I have 2 gas struts that hold up the door to the fiberglass cap on my truck. Well, they don't hold up anything anymore. When I open the door, it's hard to fully lift the door up, you can feel the resistance in the cylinders. Once up, they don't hold at all, the door falls right back down freely.

So is there any repair to these or are they throw-a-ways?

quadrod
11-28-2010, 07:14 AM
Probably throw-aways and most likely shockingly expensive.

flathead4
11-28-2010, 08:01 AM
I replaced them on a hatch-back vehicle once. I bought the replacements from J.C. Witney. I don't recall them being that much but that was back in '95.

Tom

Dragons_fire
11-28-2010, 08:21 AM
As far as i know, there isnt really any way to fix them. Princess Auto sells a lot of different sizes for cheap. You should be able to replace them fairly easily.

Dragons_fire
11-28-2010, 08:32 AM
I just searched, heres the link to some 12" ones, http://www.princessauto.com/surplus/miscellaneous-surplus/miscellaneous-surplus/8346306-gas-shock
and they also have 9.5", 18.5", 19.5" and 20" ones.

winchman
11-28-2010, 12:49 PM
I added some rub blocks to the lower end of one of my strut to increase the friction. Now it takes a little more effort to raise the door, but it stays up just fine. Cost a few minutes, some scrap plastic, and some tie-wraps.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/1003/winchman/Miscellaneous052.jpg

Form what I've read, the struts cannot be DIY-rejuvinated beause of the very high pressure required.

ikdor
11-28-2010, 01:00 PM
When you replace them make sure they are mounted up-side-down, so with the cylinder up and the rod down.
This way the seal will stay lubricated and won't fail as quickly.

Igor

jatt
11-28-2010, 02:05 PM
In your case I'm not sure if they can be regassed, and if so whether it will be feasable.This maybe a little off course, but I recon its useful info just the same.What I do know, however with the new ones I puchased in the shop is that if they were over/under pressure for a particular job, it was simply a case of getting my supplier to alter the pressure within. Now these were quite long rams, not sure if the really short ones can have this done to them. The reason I mentioned this is it can get quite expensive to carry several sets of struts of varying pressure.Hope this helps someone.

tumutbound
11-28-2010, 03:11 PM
It can be done, there's a company here that specialises in regassing struts. (http://www.strutregas.com.au/)
The technology is fairly simple and works pretty well. Perhaps a business opportunity for someone?

I realise that this information if probably useless to you unless you're in Australia

crrmeyer
11-28-2010, 03:31 PM
I have 2 gas struts that hold up the door to the fiberglass cap on my truck. Well, they don't hold up anything anymore. When I open the door, it's hard to fully lift the door up, you can feel the resistance in the cylinders. Once up, they don't hold at all, the door falls right back down freely.

So is there any repair to these or are they throw-a-ways?

Throw-away. But you can get cheap replacements on Ebay specifically for that purpose.

Forrest Addy
11-28-2010, 04:33 PM
Can't you use a stick to prop it open? Just thinkin'.

rws
11-28-2010, 04:51 PM
Can't you use a stick to prop it open? Just thinkin'.
I have thought of that! Probably what I end up doing! Just thought there was an easy way to fix them.

Thruthefence
11-28-2010, 08:52 PM
I actually made up a pressure vessel out of pipe & caps, long enough to accept a gas strut (which was only 12" long extended)and put a schrader valve in one end. I pressurized the hole mess to ( I think 800 psig ) with nitrogen. ( I know, I know, but I was much younger then) the theory being, the high pressure would migrate IN past the seals, and rejuvenate it. I let it sit overnight pressured up.

It actually worked.

For about two days.

Then, weak as ever.

Don Young
11-28-2010, 09:09 PM
I remember seeing a mechanical latch someone made for these struts. I don't remember the details but it had a long springy piece fastened to the rod end. That piece rode along the length of the cylinder. When the cylinder was fully extended the springy piece flipped off the cylinder and rested against the rod, thus preventing the strut from compressing. To release the latch it was pulled outward while the strut was compressed until the latch again rode along the cylinder.

tumutbound
11-28-2010, 09:18 PM
I actually made up a pressure vessel out of pipe & caps, long enough to accept a gas strut (which was only 12" long extended)and put a schrader valve in one end. I pressurized the hole mess to ( I think 800 psig ) with nitrogen. ( I know, I know, but I was much younger then) the theory being, the high pressure would migrate IN past the seals, and rejuvenate it. I let it sit overnight pressured up.


The regas place I linked to earlier uses a similar process. The seals are replaced and the entire strut is put into a pressure vessel for set period. Pressure vessel is made from 6" steam pipe. Not sure whether they use nitrogen or just air.

hoof
11-28-2010, 09:53 PM
I've allways used a small pair of vise-grips on the rod side next to the cylinder. Set them to the right diameter and your good to go. I just leave them with the car till it's time for the car to go to the big junk yard in the sky,:rolleyes:

Ken_Shea
11-28-2010, 10:29 PM
They do make plastic back up props but this looks cheap and quick, I thought pretty ingenious.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HcKnLBw3OUQ

Herm Williams
11-28-2010, 10:47 PM
I use a piece of sch40 1/2 pvc pipe. cut a 3/8 slot in one side raise the door snap the spacer on it and go from there. it would be better if the strut worked but this is less costly.
re

wtrueman
11-28-2010, 11:29 PM
I hate to sound like an old guy but: Remember the 58 chev station wagon? They had two unit lifts that actually held the back door with mechanically actuated struts. "Click" going up, "click" going down. Where have we gone wrong in fifty years? Wayne.

winchman
11-29-2010, 01:08 AM
Here's the rub block I made for my strut:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/1003/winchman/Miscellaneous052.jpg

They're actually wood instead of plastic.

RKW
11-29-2010, 08:14 AM
McMaster Carr ... $12-$20 each unless you want stainless, then they are $50-$100 each.

You still need to fabricate or buy the correct ends for the cylinder rods.

gmatov
12-01-2010, 12:52 AM
They're throwaways, and they are not "shock"ingly expensive. They might be 50 to 60 bucks a pair. I'd sooner go buy a pair than try to bypass them.

Hey, they are a hell of a lot better than all them other cars have, a piece of heavy wire for a hood prop.

Cheers,

George

garagemark
12-01-2010, 06:51 AM
I'm with George here. Toss em and buy new. Most auto parts stores carry the things and, personally, I'd rather have a lid that opened easily and stayed there without a lot of hassle.

Ching! Two more cents worth.

Mark

gmatov
12-02-2010, 01:39 AM
Mark,

One strut lifts the hood of my Audi. I pull the latch inside, pull the little plastic tab that juts out of the grill, lift mebbe 40 pounds of a big hood, with integral grill.

Them are not low pressure systems.

All my older Audis had 2 lifts, and I have had to replace them. Refill them? No way. If they have leaked down, they would leak down faster if you COULD refill them.

Cheers,

George