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oddball racing
11-29-2010, 06:47 AM
I have a section of rail that I'd like to use for a wood splitter (only because it is here).

If I pre-heat the weld areas with a weed burning, sidewalk torch, can I send in some heavy beads that would secure to wedge and eye mount?

If it is possible to weld, should I then bury the heated area in kitty little /sand to slow cool?

Looking at re-use of something on hand, as all the "free/cheap" I beam sections I've come across have been on the thin side.

Thanks, Mike

bob308
11-29-2010, 06:57 AM
i would preheat to 150 deg. weld with 110-18 wire and let cool very slow.

Charles P
11-29-2010, 07:09 AM
Yes it's weldable. Usually by the thermite process (have a look on youtube, it's visually interesting) but you could use other methods if you can get enough heat in

Charles

rock_breaker
11-29-2010, 07:12 AM
Rails can be welded if done properly. As you say pre-heating is important. I think grinding to clean the metal is also important. The railroad companys buildup frogs and switch points on a regular basis. I am not sure today where to start looking but am reasonably sure the welding supply companys would be a good place to start; they should be able to recommend rod/wire and procedure.

Evan
11-29-2010, 08:25 AM
1/4" 6011 rod at 350 amps will weld it just fine. Either AC or electrode positive for maximum heat and penetration. If you have less current available then use preheat and 3/16 or 5/32 rod at 250 amps. 6011 isn't fussy about clean either.

jep24601
11-29-2010, 09:02 AM
What Evan said is spot on. The Thermit process is used for welding rail in place on the train tracks and is used for it's ease and efficiency in that particular application.

camdigger
11-29-2010, 01:17 PM
Rails can be welded. As with any other heavy section, preheat and slow post cooling are the order of the day. Any 60 series or above rod will work with appropriate amperages if preheat is used. Wire processes should be used with caution as cold laps and cold welds are more common.

As a proviso, family members who worked on the local railbed repair gangs section talk about post weld peening. Basically whaling away on the fresh weld as it cools with a heavy 6 lb or larger sledge. Not sure which grade of rail was involved. At the time, I didn't realize there were different grades of steel in the rails....:rolleyes:

wierdscience
11-29-2010, 01:43 PM
Vee it out,fit the parts up with an 1/8" gap all around,then preheat to 400-450f and weld with 7018.Make sure your beads all are ran in the same direction around the rail,reversing runs can cause cracking.

It's also best to once you start welding don't stop until the weld is completed.

Piening the weld counter acts contraction stresses,but the gap fitup should take care of most of that.

HSS
11-29-2010, 03:28 PM
Hey Camdigger, any fish in that lake?

camdigger
11-29-2010, 03:35 PM
Which one? There's at least 5 lakes within 20 miles. Some shown on various maps are not really lakes at all.

Evan
11-29-2010, 04:30 PM
As with any other heavy section, preheat and slow post cooling are the order of the day.

Bah. Just throw the amps to it. It'll get plenty hot. We didn't preheat anything when I worked at Dominion Bridge in Edmonton. Mostly welding 3/4 and 1 inch plate building barge sections for the MacKenzie River.

Lew Hartswick
11-29-2010, 06:42 PM
If anyone is really interested in how they do rails (for real) I have lots
of pix of the process "up close" and will post a series somewhere
you can link to. Letme know.
...Lew...

camdigger
11-29-2010, 06:47 PM
Please do. Are the welds done with thermite or with other methods? Thermite is amazing stuff. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EpOJE-mkWmw&feature=related

scmw
11-29-2010, 07:07 PM
There are several recipe's for Thermite via Google. I've tried this one successfully:

http://www.ehow.com/how_2081916_make-thermite.html

There are also some great You Tubes as well.

HTH,

Lew Hartswick
11-29-2010, 07:12 PM
Please do. Are the welds done with thermite or with other methods? Thermite is amazing stuff. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EpOJE-mkWmw&feature=related
That is the process but I have a lot of the prep and finish work too.
The container is different Co. I guess . OK I'll have to up load a bunch
to Photobucket and post the links. I don't know of any way to do it
like a slide show.
...lew...

ikdor
11-30-2010, 09:59 AM
A guy from our welding lab showed me some pictures of a resistance welding process for railroad track that was recently developed. I didn't see a picture of the power supply though.....:eek:

Igor

Evan
11-30-2010, 10:04 AM
Do the lights go dim in Holland very often? :D

lazlo
11-30-2010, 11:47 AM
As a proviso, family members who worked on the local railbed repair gangs section talk about post weld peening. Basically whaling away on the fresh weld as it cools with a heavy 6 lb or larger sledge.

That sounds to me like they were trying to keep the track from warping, not cracking.

For the OP, that depends on how big the weld is compared to the track section.
Couldn't hurt to peen it anyway, although it makes an ugly bead.