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Mcruff
12-04-2010, 09:51 PM
I have a small 4"x6" band saw (64 1/2" blade length) I have had for many years. It cuts great and all even after 100's of hours of use. I have been for the last 10 years or so been having my bandsaw blades made by a local guy that is fairly old. The problem is the last 3-4 he has made have not held up, they seem to be breaking at the weld everytime after only a few hours use. I am going to start buying my blades factory welded. The ones I have been getting from him all these years were Lennox 18 tooth blades. I got a used blade (rewelded) from work that was a 14 tooth raker, it cuts good but when I looked in Enco's catalog the only blades that match the specs are .025" thick instead of .032".

Heck back when I used this little saw all thru the 90's to make a living the saw would run 4-6 hours a day for weeks on end and the blades would last for months of that kind of use.
What do some of you use on your small 4"x6" saws, type and brand? I generally cut mild steel to tool steel.

JoeLee
12-04-2010, 09:56 PM
I have the same size band for my Wilton saw. The best I have found so far are Rotgen, I think thats how it spelled. I get them from George Radner Co. about $18 each. The last one I had lasted over 4 years....... I cut a lot of stainless with it too. Well worth the money.

JL............

Rich Carlstedt
12-04-2010, 10:26 PM
Lenox Bimetal Blades from MSC called "Diemaster 2"
10 TPI

Hands down awesome

ADGO_Racing
12-04-2010, 10:51 PM
Lenox Bimetal Blades from MSC called "Diemaster 2"
10 TPI

Hands down awesome

+1 for any Lenox blades. That is all I use, never have any problems. They may cost a little more, but I have one in the saw now, I was just thinking this week that it has to be almost two years old. It gets a lot of use in Stainless (316/304), 4130 tube condition N, Mild steel box tube, and 4130 flat/round bar and some 4140 HT as well as your typical aluminum and 1018 materials.

gwilson
12-04-2010, 10:59 PM
File the weld clean without unduly thinning the blade,and heat the weld joint blue in as restricted an area as you can at the weld. A metal clamp at each side of the weld will be heat sinks to stop the blue from softening too much of the blade. This should solve your problem,unless there is a defect in the actual weld. Examine a broken blade and see if there is a gap in the weld from theblade ends not having been gotten square with each other before welding.

If you find the weld hard to file when you start cleaning it with the file,you have the answer: the weld was not annealed by heating it blue. I always brighten my welds so I can be certain I have reached the proper blue color when I hit the anneal button. Sometimes I even will re- clean the weld and anneal it again.

J Tiers
12-04-2010, 11:35 PM
I have a small 4"x6" band saw (64 1/2" blade length) I have had for many years. It cuts great and all even after 100's of hours of use.

What brand saw?

I have an Atlas that I have forgotten the blade length on, since I use Lenox and hardly ever need to replace it. The length was something like that, wondered if it was the same saw

Mcruff
12-05-2010, 11:31 AM
This is a RongFu I bought new from MSC in 1992.

I am going to order a couple of new Lennox Bi metal blades from MSC monday.

gary350
12-05-2010, 11:42 AM
I always buy my band saw blades from DoAll because they are guaranteed not to brake. If they brake they give you a free replacement blade. DoAll is a little expensive but I have been getting about 5 times longer life from their blades than cheap brands so the price is well worth it.

Here is a good trip a guy from England showed me years ago. Build a fixture that will hold your band saw blade at about 5 degree angle. Put the fixture in the surface grinder and grind a 5 degree angle on each end of the broken blade. Angles have to be so the ends over lap and can be silver soldered together. Make another fixture that holds the blade ends together so you can silver solder them with a torch. The blade over lap needs to be at least 1/8". When it cools sand it smooth and its is ready to use. This works great.

fishfrnzy
12-05-2010, 04:19 PM
Lennox Diemaster, great blades. As to the thickness I prefer the .025. Mine uses a 93.5" but they are way easier to put on than a .035 and they seem to cut faster and cooler. IMHO

gwilson
12-05-2010, 04:23 PM
I used to have to silver solder blades in school shop. They lasted much better than welded blades.

J Tiers
12-05-2010, 09:42 PM
I used to have to silver solder blades in school shop. They lasted much better than welded blades.

I still remember the shop instructors trying to silver-solder a blade..... it broke as soon as they put it on. They must have tried 3 times at least.

I think they must have been trying to butt-solder it.... I don't recall the details now. That or they didn't scarf it enough.