PDA

View Full Version : How to use a strap wrench



Tony Ennis
12-05-2010, 05:32 PM
I bought a strap wrench to help me get my perpetually-stuck faceplate off my lathe. The first strap-wrench worked but broke - the end of the rubber strap that's connected to the handle tore through. That's with about 4 uses.

So, is there a right way to do this? Should I be putting a lot of pressure on the connection point? The handle seems to be made to allow the pressure to be taken off of this point, but I sure can't figure it out.

Al Messer
12-05-2010, 05:35 PM
I don't know about the proper way to use a strap wrench, but, while you had the faceplate removed, were you able to track down the reason that it gets stuck, such as a damaged thread?

KiddZimaHater
12-05-2010, 05:39 PM
Rubber strap ???:eek:
Every strap-wrench I've ever seen has had either a nylon or canvas strap.:confused:
To use, just wrap the strap around whatever you need to tighten/loosen and feed the strap back thru the handle-bracket, kinda like a belt buckle.

Tony Ennis
12-05-2010, 05:44 PM
The threads look fine to me. It's probably because the ape operating the lathe put it on too tight. I was trying to make sure it was properly seated on the spindle - this is a continuation from a thread I started about 8 weeks ago - trying to locate the .005" runout in my spindle.

Since then, I got a FT job and have been run ragged ever since - have not been in the shop a single time.

Now wife is wanting stuff made (topic for another thread!) and so I really ought to get the lathe minimally functioning. For what I need, .005" is more than accurate enough.

Tony Ennis
12-05-2010, 05:48 PM
Rubber strap???

It's about a 1/4" thick x 1" wide piece of rubber. One end is molded to have a hole in parallel to it's face. It's secured to the handle by a pin passing through this hole. This is what tore out on the first strap wrench.

Yeah, I threaded it through as per KZH. But every bit of the force is on the molded part. I was hoping I was doing it wrong and the handle was supposed to pinch the band, removing presure from the molded part.

Toolguy
12-05-2010, 05:49 PM
I have 2 or 3 of each kind. The rubber strap ones can't take that much of a load. The best one I have is a Klein Grip It that has a rubber covered nylon strap with a big aluminum handle and a roller chain master link connecting the strap to the handle. There are some other ones out there that use V belts for the strap that work pretty good too. Also, you could make a metal bar with 2 dowel pins in it that correspond to holes or slots in the faceplate and tighten and loosen it that way.

Tony Ennis
12-05-2010, 06:35 PM
Strap-wrench wins again and survives to unscrew another day. Now I just have to drill and tap my bolt holes.

Thanks all.

radkins
12-05-2010, 07:28 PM
After going through several of the rubber strap type wrenches (Craftsman) I finally figured out the only way to use one without breaking it. It's actually quite simple just open the package, toss the package into your tool box and the strap wrench in the trash. Doing it this way will save a lot of anguish and frustration plus you keep the skin on your knuckles intact.

mike4
12-05-2010, 08:09 PM
After going through several of the rubber strap type wrenches (Craftsman) I finally figured out the only way to use one without breaking it. It's actually quite simple just open the package, toss the package into your tool box and the strap wrench in the trash. Doing it this way will save a lot of anguish and frustration plus you keep the skin on your knuckles intact.
Toss the rubber strap and fit a piece of seatbelt or a short piece of lashing strap ,most truckers have damaged ones which you can cut a perfectly serviceable length off.
My .02 worth
Michael

rohart
12-05-2010, 08:19 PM
To get a driving plate undone I hit the peg with a rubber hammer.

Why not turn a nice spigot to fit in one of he holes in your face plate, and give it a gentle wallop with a rubber hammer.

The general friction in the spindle/thread should stop it turning more 1/4 turn after the impact, so there'll be no drama.

On reflection, this is probably not the best method if you want to remount the faceplate with the work still mounted, as it may get moved by the impact. Fine if you've finished, of course.

Your Old Dog
12-05-2010, 08:30 PM
If you haven't discovered this yet then it may interest you.

When mine gets stuck. I take piece of 1/2 maple doweling, place the end of the dowel into the faceplates slot and give it one sharp wrap with a hammer in the counter-clockwise direction. No muss, no fuss. If it takes more then one whap to loosed 5 or 6 very large threads of about 1" long then it may be welded on? :D

I should have added that I lock the quill down first but if you're in a gear it may still work.

Boucher
12-05-2010, 11:12 PM
Don't use grease on the faceplate connection use tool joint compound or anti-seize. Grease is designed to be slick that is not the characteristic you want or need. The better compounds are the ones that have copper in them.