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View Full Version : where do I get one hexagon dies stocks



Brett Hurt
12-06-2010, 10:23 PM
I have a some that very small it is .585 flat to flat on the hexagon seams to me no one sells them. Where should I look Brett

.RC.
12-06-2010, 10:30 PM
Hexagon dies are not for cutting threads... They are die nuts used to repair damaged threads with a spanner...

J. Randall
12-07-2010, 12:36 AM
I have some hex thread cleaning dies, and I also have some hex dies that will cut threads, very nice ones, don't remember the brand, also have the hex die stock, but don't remember a brand name on it. Sorry not much help.
James

winchman
12-07-2010, 01:27 AM
Hexagon dies are not for cutting threads... They are die nuts used to repair damaged threads with a spanner...

They seem to work pretty well for threading, and there are lots of sets sold along with taps. If a solid non-adjustable tap is OK, why not a solid non-adjustable die?

jimmstruk
12-07-2010, 03:36 AM
I use a 6 point or a 12 point socket, usually 3/8 drive to turn hex dies. You can utilize short sockets, deep sockets, extensions, T handles, ratchets etc. Those hex dies can be turned with open end or box wrenches. What ever it takes to get the job done. JIM

J. Randall
12-07-2010, 04:44 AM
They seem to work pretty well for threading, and there are lots of sets sold along with taps. If a solid non-adjustable tap is OK, why not a solid non-adjustable die?

Winchman, I have a set of the die nuts he is describing, bought off the Mac tool truck yrs ago, they work as he described and are a different hex size for each stud size, and you turn them with a spanner. The hex dies I have are all the same size outside and I have the die stock that turns them, they work well. Maybe they don't sell them over there where he is.
James

winchman
12-07-2010, 07:35 AM
Thanks. Now I understand what you're talking about.

Carld
12-07-2010, 09:11 AM
Years ago I started buying the hex dies to chase threads but I was careful to only buy the HSS dies. If you have the carbon steel they are only good for chasing but the HSS will cut a thread if used carefully. I always use a socket or a wrench to turn them.

I like the hex dies for starting a thread in the lathe when I am going to use a die to thread the work. I put the hex die between the work and the tailstock chuck with the jaws retracted into the body and then start the thread. I can then finish the thread with that die or switch to a die in a holder if the handles will clear the bed.

lazlo
12-07-2010, 10:13 AM
Almost all the dies Sears sells are hex threading dies.

gary350
12-07-2010, 10:24 AM
1-800-251-4038

firbikrhd1
12-07-2010, 10:26 AM
Actually, there are Hexagon dies, not just thread chasers. Hanson Ace makes them and they are sold by Mac Tools among others. The are available in HSS and carbon steel. I own a metric and an American set. The set contains a die handle for two sizes a small one, around 1/2 inch and larger one. Snap On also outsources their taps and dies to Hanson (or did when I was a Snap on dealer) but theirs are 12 point and a 12 point wrench or socket will fit them. The Snap on dies are (or were) adjustable as well.

lazlo
12-07-2010, 10:30 AM
Almost all the dies Sears sells are hex threading dies.
...

Actually, there are Hexagon dies, not just thread chasers. Hanson Ace makes them and they are sold by Mac Tools among others.

I'd be willing to bet they're the same dies, from the same Danaher manufacturer.

Brett Hurt
12-07-2010, 10:56 AM
It is a dia to make threads 12x24 made by ace so where do I go to a get a handel for it or how to make one. What I use them for is music box repair that is what I do, the really old ones , Brett

Jerry
12-07-2010, 11:54 AM
I own two 12 point tap and die sets, that are in nicely fitted wooden boxs, one numbered and one fractional, that I purchased from Snap-On many years ago. I made up this holder that utilizes 12 point sockets, cut down and silver soldered in place in the holder that is shown here, that I built for these T&D sets. I still enjoy using them, although I have aquired a number of other more conventional sets.
http://www.pbase.com/stormchaser/image/122504334.jpg
http://www.pbase.com/stormchaser/image/122504335.jpg

Rustybolt
12-07-2010, 02:27 PM
http://www.irwin.com/tools/taps-dies-sets/re-threading-hexagon-metric-dies-right-left-hand-hcs

lazlo
12-07-2010, 02:29 PM
http://www.irwin.com/tools/taps-dies-sets/re-threading-hexagon-metric-dies-right-left-hand-hcs

That's a re-threading die. :)

Here's a random Sears hex threading die set:

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00952305000P

http://s.shld.net/is/image/Sears/00952312000?hei=600&wid=600&op_sharpen=1&qlt=90,0& resMode=sharp&op_usm=0.9,0.5,0,0

lynnl
12-07-2010, 02:42 PM
This is somethings that's always puzzled me.
What would be the inherent difference in a rethreading vs threading die?
Is one somehow ground or shaped different?

As for carbon vs hss, other than tool life, I fail to see why a good quality, high carbon steel die would not be a good die. After all, carbon steel was widely used for lathe tools and such in the days before HSS became readily available.

lazlo
12-07-2010, 02:57 PM
What would be the inherent difference in a rethreading vs threading die?

A re-threading die has blunt teeth. It's meant to swage the threads back into shape.

lynnl
12-07-2010, 03:26 PM
Thnx Lazlo, I guess then I've never seen a rethreading die.

Tho I do have a set of taps & dies that could only be used for rethreading of maybe plastic or nylon, if even that!
I must've acquired that in a box of stuff at auction (I certainly would've never knowingly bought such crap intentionally).

I have a bunch of Craftsman and Hansen hex dies which seem to serve my purposes OK. I'm pretty sure they're all carbon steel, but they've worked as well for me as the few round HSS ones I have.

PeteM
12-07-2010, 04:53 PM
. . . As for carbon vs hss, other than tool life, I fail to see why a good quality, high carbon steel die would not be a good die. After all, carbon steel was widely used for lathe tools and such in the days before HSS became readily available.

You're right. The advantage of HSS is hardness at high heat; something that isn't a significant problem in home shop use with manual threading and sufficient cutting oil. It's a bit like quality knives -- a good carbon steel can certainly hold a keen and strong edge.

In the "good old days" a wide variety of very high quality carbon steel taps and dies were available. Find such a new old stock set and be glad.

Today, however, many top line manufacturers (e.g. good steels, carefully heat treated, with precisely cut or ground threads) seem to have dropped their carbon steel offerings -- the difference in material cost just isn't all that big a part of finished goods cost. In contrast, the crappy sets (e.g. mystery metal, haphazardly processed) don't bother. This has given many folks the false impression that a quality set of manual taps and dies needs to be HSS.

lazlo
12-07-2010, 05:12 PM
It's a bit like quality knives -- a good carbon steel can certainly hold a keen and strong edge.

But many, arguably most, custom knives are made from tool steel (O1, A2, D2, W2, 52100, ...) because they have vastly better toughness and wear resistance than plain carbon steel.

I agree though -- I never understood why dies were made from high-speed steel. An uber wear-resistant tool steel like D2 or 3V/10V would last a lot longer.

Don Young
12-07-2010, 09:37 PM
It does seem that re-threading dies are nearly always hexagon but it is a mistake to think threading dies are not made that way. I have some Snap-On and some Craftsman threading dies that are hexagon and I have a very old set of Blue-Point (by Snap-On) dies that are double hexagon (12 points) and they have cut many, many threads from scratch. These dies are split adjustable HSS and come with a die stock that has alignment fingers for starting the die straight.

ligito
12-08-2010, 09:56 AM
And these:
http://www.irwin.com/tools/taps-dies-sets/hexagon-machine-screw-dies-hcs

I have had a set of hex dies that fit in the handle of the die holder, since the 60's.