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The Artful Bodger
12-12-2010, 03:36 PM
......... I am sure it is not but I wonder what it really was intended for?

http://images.trademe.co.nz/photoserver/32/153511132_full.jpg

dp
12-12-2010, 03:43 PM
Probably a type of switchless multi-channel telegraph. Some telegraphs were on a line - relays. Others were hubs. Hubs had some clever switching to forward traffic to the right destination or relay.

Cool old book on wired telegraph technology:

http://books.google.com/books?id=gipNAAAAYAAJ&lpg=PA37&ots=2_-VJBEZZC&dq=telegraph%20line%20switches&pg=PA6#v=onepage&q=telegraph%20line%20switches&f=false

The Artful Bodger
12-12-2010, 03:48 PM
Maybe, but I am sure there were not five hands on that cramped keyboard at one time!;)

dp
12-12-2010, 04:28 PM
Maybe, but I am sure there were not five hands on that cramped keyboard at one time!;)

Surely not - it would have been one of several that each telegrapher had at his station. Similar to news bureaus with rows of teletype machines when they became the rage. Here's some more switchboards and you can imagine the bank of keys would have been quicker than screwing with switches.

http://artifaxbooks.com/fslandline.htm

Weston Bye
12-12-2010, 04:31 PM
That's a strange one. Where'd you get it? The shape of the key knobs doesn't look conducive to multi-finger operation, and they look too close together to comfortably hold a single knob for an extended time.

Strange...

oldtiffie
12-12-2010, 04:37 PM
Any help?

http://www.google.com.au/search?hl=en&source=hp&q=baudot+code+generator&meta=&aq=1&aqi=g10&aql=&oq=baudot&gs_rfai=

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baudot_code

dp
12-12-2010, 04:44 PM
Here's an actual Baudot keyboard:

http://www.samhallas.co.uk/telhist1/telehist2.htm#Baudot

The Artful Bodger
12-12-2010, 04:46 PM
Surely not - it would have been one of several that each telegrapher had at his station. Similar to news bureaus with rows of teletype machines when they became the rage. Here's some more switchboards and you can imagine the bank of keys would have been quicker than screwing with switches.

http://artifaxbooks.com/fslandline.htm

I cannot agree at all, those keys are so close together that only the one on the end could be comfortably used.

Your scenario of one operator having keys for five circuits is totally different to your news bureau example. News bureaus received from multiple sources and anyone with a row of teletypes to attend would be only tearing paper off and passing it to editors, or who ever. The news bureau I was unfortunate enough to have experience of had about 25 inward teletype circuits and about four out.

The Artful Bodger
12-12-2010, 04:50 PM
Here's an actual Baudot keyboard:

http://www.samhallas.co.uk/telhist1/telehist2.htm#Baudot

Indeed it is but like I said the exaple I posted is not likely to be for use with Baudot code. BTW you could send Baudot code with a single key if the baud rate was low enough, or you were at least half as good as some people claim they are with Morse code.;)

The Artful Bodger
12-12-2010, 04:53 PM
That's a strange one. Where'd you get it? The shape of the key knobs doesn't look conducive to multi-finger operation, and they look too close together to comfortably hold a single knob for an extended time.

Strange...

It is not mine Weston, it is offered for sale on a NZ online auction, currently bidding at about $37.

I have never seen such a thing and it does appear to be made to be a single assembly, not mearly five morse keys on a bit of wood.

The Artful Bodger
12-12-2010, 04:55 PM
Any help?

http://www.google.com.au/search?hl=en&source=hp&q=baudot+code+generator&meta=&aq=1&aqi=g10&aql=&oq=baudot&gs_rfai=

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baudot_code

Thanks Tiffie, very interesting links.

Australia has the distinction of setting in my memory that you once had teletype channels operating at an effective 12.5 buad! Actually the baud rate was 50 bauds but the channels were shared by four teletypes.

The Artful Bodger
12-12-2010, 04:58 PM
This is the description given by the vendor:-


This unit was made by CF Palmer & Sons in the 1930s for use in scientific experiments where signal inputs were required at various times usually being indicated on a smoked paper kymograph. They were listed by Palmers as Multiple Reaction Keys.



And from Wiki.


A kymograph (which means 'wave writer') is a device that gives a graphical representation of spatial position over time in which a spatial axis represents time. It basically consists of a revolving drum wrapped with a sheet of paper on which a stylus moves back and forth recording perceived changes of phenomena such as motion or pressure.[1]

It was invented by German physiologist Carl Ludwig in the 1840s and found its first use as a means to intrusively monitor blood pressure, and has found several applications in the field of medicine.[2] Its primary use was to measure phenomena such as changes in muscular contractions or other physiological processes, including speech sounds. Kymographs were also used to measure atmospheric pressure, tuning fork vibrations, and the functioning of steam engines.