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radkins
12-12-2010, 06:18 PM
Anyone have any info on a DIY shop built manual mill? I am talking a simple manual mill similar to the common round column mills but a Google search just seems to turn up links to CNC outfits. As far as cost I am not trying to get by cheap here and I fully realize it would be cheaper to just buy one but there is much more to it than that and costs are not much of a factor (within reason of course), it is just something I want to do and I am looking for ideas and suggestions before I undertake this project.

The Artful Bodger
12-12-2010, 06:21 PM
I have seen ideas for using a scrapped engine block as a basis for a machine where you want rigidity and accurately machined surfaces.

Ries
12-12-2010, 06:31 PM
there are the Gingery machines-
http://www.lindsaybks.com/dgjp/djgbk/series/index.html

pretty mickey mouse, if you ask me, but they are home made.

I would think you need a mill to make a mill.
And many of the parts involved are cheap to make 1000 of, but very hard to make one or two of. If you are Rong Fu, and you make 5000 mill drills a month, you can knock out the dovetails, and the quills, for pennies each.
Making ONE, at home, is much more complicated.

rp designs
12-12-2010, 06:46 PM
Here is an Aluminum homebuilt CNC. The manual version would be the same with handwheels and less expensive leadscrews.

http://www.cnczone.com/forums/vertical_mill_lathe_project_log/96410-diy_aluminum_vertical_mill_build.html

Evan
12-12-2010, 07:54 PM
This is mine before the CNC drives were attached. I used it in manual mode for about a year. Note that there is much more to this design than can be discerned from the pictues. Also, it isn't quite complete in this photo as the drive motor isn't installed.

http://ixian.ca/pics8/cncmill2.JPG

lazlo
12-12-2010, 08:13 PM
Here is an Aluminum homebuilt CNC. The manual version would be the same with handwheels and less expensive leadscrews.

http://www.cnczone.com/forums/vertical_mill_lathe_project_log/96410-diy_aluminum_vertical_mill_build.html

Wow, very impressive build. Reminds me a lot of 5Bears' machine: high-end precision ground ballscrews and linear rails.

http://www.5bears.com/cnc24.htm

Got a chuckle out of his comments about the X2 milling head he bought from Little Machine Shop:

"After receiving and checking over the X2 head from LMS, it didn't exactly blow my skirt up. Eight tenths of run out in the taper. Add in a Tormach collet, holder and the total runout could be terrible depending on how it stacked."

J. Randall
12-12-2010, 10:54 PM
I always thought this one by G. A. Ewen was a pretty clever build.
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=11268&highlight=engine+block+mill

Hope the link works.
James

radkins
12-13-2010, 11:14 AM
Thanks guys, The mill Evan built and that CNC project are sure impressive and I enjoyed seeing them but they are a bit more involved than what I had in mind. Still I very much appreciate seeing what can be done and it has given me ideas. That engine block machine is more in line with what I was thinking except for being a horizontal mill, that too has given me something to think about so maybe I can come up with something original. I have on hand quite a bit of bar ranging from 2 /12" up to 4" in 4' lengths, this is ground and polished bar and is fairly close tolerance. I have also a lot of other odds and ends of this type including large diameter heavy wall tubing, racks and gears, etc among other items. Looking at all this stuff I was wondering what I could do with it and the idea of building a mill is what I came up with. I would like to have found an example of a small vertical mill similar in design to the round column mills (I know round columns have their problems however they are simpler in design) but I am open to any ideas, that engine block is an example of innovative thinking and maybe could be used in a vertical design.


Edit, I made a blunder there and accidentally posted in the wrong place and for some reason had the dickens of a time correcting the problem, sorry about the confusing postings!

lazlo
12-13-2010, 03:31 PM
The aluminum CNC mill that R P posted from CNCZone is especially impressive when you read that he built it entirely by hand -- he didn't have a mill! :)

alanganes
12-13-2010, 03:55 PM
Hmmmm, 840 views and not one wise-[guy] comment about the picture that is half showing on the wall above Evan's mill?

Shocking, coming from this crowd.

A.K. Boomer
12-13-2010, 04:16 PM
Hmmmm, 840 views and not one wise-[guy] comment about the picture that is half showing on the wall above Evan's mill?

Shocking, coming from this crowd.


I seen that before even looking at the mill, Evan has good taste in legs:p not being a wise guy, just can appreciate that's all.

radkins
12-13-2010, 05:00 PM
There is a mill in the pic he posted? :)

davidwdyer
12-13-2010, 06:06 PM
Hmmmm, 840 views and not one wise-[guy] comment about the picture that is half showing on the wall above Evan's mill?

Shocking, coming from this crowd.

Since I know Evan is into photography, I just assumed it was a picture of his loving wife whom he enjoys admiring while working with his machines.:D

Evan
12-13-2010, 06:11 PM
It's a calendar from a local tool dealer. Nudity isn't pornographic, especially not in Germany and Europe in general.

lazlo
12-13-2010, 07:23 PM
It's a calendar from a local tool dealer. Nudity isn't pornographic, especially not in Germany and Europe in general.

Oh come on -- naked women sitting on machine tools is definitely porn. :)

The Mitutoyo calendar is a classic -- some of the most gorgeous women you've ever seen, most with not a stitch of clothing, and as Peter Neil pointed out, if you look closely, there's a Mitutoyo product hidden somewhere in every picture :p

I have to have our British model engineering friends bootleg the dang calendar to the 'States each year, since we're so PC.

Evan
12-13-2010, 07:30 PM
Oh come on -- naked women sitting on machine tools is definitely porn.

Not according to currently accepted community standards.

John Stevenson
12-13-2010, 07:40 PM
To get back on topic have a look at the Dore Westbury mill.
that was offered as a kit of parts that could be finished on a Myford sized lathe and bench drill.

The kits are no longer available but it gives you an idea.
No dovetails but what the trade now call box section ways made up from sandwiching strips of cold rolled flat.

Links at http://www.lathes.co.uk/dore%20westbury/index.html

[EDIT] Black Forest, I would not go so far as to class Evan as a pervert but more of a person with the social graces of a cinder block.

.

lazlo
12-13-2010, 08:03 PM
I would not go so far as to class Evan as a pervert but more of a person with the social graces of a cinder block.

But Evan has the hardest concrete in the world, so that's a Hell of a cinder block! :)

Evan
12-13-2010, 09:10 PM
I am in good company.

John Stevenson
12-14-2010, 04:05 AM
I am in good company.

I agree, being out in the backwoods of BC is rather remote.

jackary
12-14-2010, 05:10 AM
It could be the Miller's wife just finishing flour arranging
Alan

radkins
12-14-2010, 09:40 AM
To get back on topic have a look at the Dore Westbury mill.

Links at http://www.lathes.co.uk/dore%20westbury/index.html.


Now that's what I had in mind! Making use of all that round stock is exactly what I wanted to do and those pics in the link are interesting indeed, thanks for the link.


As an added note maybe someone can shed a bit of light on what material some of this round stock is. I bought it at a scrap yard for just a couple of dollars thinking I had scored some high quality steel bar for almost free, actually I am attracted to anything shiny and new looking :) . This stuff is very hard 3 3/4" diameter (close tolerance along the entire length) ground and polished bar in 4' lengths. It appears to be very rust resistant although a piece of it that was cut off and left out in the weather for a few weeks has developed some surface rust on the polished surface and somewhat heavier rust on the cut surface. It is magnetic but will not flame cut at all and when sawed the chips are really fine, almost powdery and dark grey very similar to cast iron. After sawing some of these bars I had about concluded that they were indeed cast iron but I used a hammer and vise and tried to break a 1/8" thin section I sawed off and if it is cast iron it is surely the strongest cast iron I have ever seen! I am quite familiar with Manganese bar and I am sure that is not what it is but ground and polished cast iron bar?

lazlo
12-14-2010, 09:48 AM
This stuff is very hard 3 3/4" diameter (close tolerance along the entire length) ground and polished bar in 4' lengths. It appears to be very rust resistant

Hydraulic shafting?

Cast iron will have a grain to it.

radkins
12-14-2010, 10:03 AM
It looks like hyd shafting but that stuff is plated and flame cuts. Thinking it might be malleable iron casting I heated that 1/8" piece red hot and let it cool then tried to break it but unlike malleable iron it seemed to lose little if any strength, bending it while still red hot it bent to 90 degs but did develop some cracking although it did not separate completely like I would have expected cast iron to do.

Evan
12-14-2010, 12:20 PM
It isn't likely to be malleable iron since it is close to the maximum section size that can be produced as white iron (about six inches). Instead, it is probably high chromium cast iron. High chrome iron is used for abrasive wear resistance as it contains crystals of chromium carbide. It is usually produced, ground and used in the annealed condition because once hardened it is unmachinable. Hardening is mainly by work hardening of the surface. It is used in trash pumps, rolling mills and other hyper abrasive environments. High chrome iron can be produced in any section size since it doesn't depend on fast quenching to produce white iron as an intermediate stage.

loose nut
12-14-2010, 12:28 PM
Oh come on -- naked women sitting on machine tools is definitely porn. :)




The naked woman is art, the machine is tool porn. You where half right.

radkins
12-14-2010, 12:43 PM
It isn't likely to be malleable iron since it is close to the maximum section size that can be produced as white iron (about six inches). Instead, it is probably high chromium cast iron. High chrome iron is used for abrasive wear resistance as it contains crystals of chromium carbide. It is usually produced, ground and used in the annealed condition because once hardened it is unmachinable. Hardening is mainly by work hardening of the surface. It is used in trash pumps, rolling mills and other hyper abrasive environments. High chrome iron can be produced in any section size since it doesn't depend on fast quenching to produce white iron as an intermediate stage.



Evan you are probably right and to make it even more likely is the fact these things are droppings from some shafting at a shop where stone and gravel crushing equipment is rebuilt, at least that is where the guy at the scrap yard said he got it. In any case I have next to nothing in it as to cost so if I can't find a use for it then it will be no real loss. The other bar I have is mostly 4140 and 4150 and while it probably would be a waste to use that for mill columns I have several large pieces of it and it won't hurt to sacrifice a few feet of it for the mill project, maybe that cast shaft could even be used there if I can machine the ends, sure is hard to cut however.

Alistair Hosie
12-14-2010, 12:47 PM
Evan nice mill what happened to the green handles I sent you :D ?Alistair

Evan
12-14-2010, 12:50 PM
They are probably held up in customs...

John Stevenson
12-14-2010, 02:05 PM
They are probably held up in customs...

Can't be, you reckon you got them all sorted out :D

Evan
12-14-2010, 02:19 PM
Perhaps not. I just got a notice yesterday that there is a parcel for me at the post office. I am not expecting anything just yet so perhaps it is the green handles. I'll be going in the afternoon to pick it up. :D