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rotate
12-13-2010, 05:54 PM
This is a charming video of how love of craftsmanship can produce something very beautiful. I bet more than one home shop machinist would have been involved in keeping Linotype machine up and running.

http://www.vimeo.com/5228616

Each of those book is $4600. Considering the amount of work involved, it's not that unreasonable.

Bob Farr
12-13-2010, 06:13 PM
Thanks for sharing the video. I enjoyed watching the process, which was a nice balance of handwork and automation. It highlights the whole 'tool-to-make-a-tool-to-make-a-tool ...' problem, too!

jkilroy
12-13-2010, 07:11 PM
Boy that brings back memories, my grandfather was a type setter and printer, had equipment just like that and more. What a great skill to see passed on.

John Stevenson
12-13-2010, 07:47 PM
Sorry but that's unwatchable because of the dirge in the background that's louder than the narration.

Carld
12-13-2010, 09:52 PM
Hmm, the first dirge is a finger style version of John Loudermilk's Windy and Warm which I enjoy playing much like that version and the next dirge is Rev. Gary Davis playing the Entertainer.

The video was very interesting, thanks.

millwrong
12-13-2010, 10:17 PM
"Sorry but that's unwatchable because of the dirge in the background..."

Really!?!:confused: So Lady Gaga is what's playing in the shop??:rolleyes: You are the 21st century man!

Mcgyver
12-13-2010, 10:23 PM
that was interesting, lots there I didn't know, thanks

Liger Zero
12-13-2010, 10:57 PM
The Mormon Church maintains the Grandin Print Shop (Palmyra NY) where the first edition Book Of Mormon was printed. It's all static exhibits but it gives you a good idea of exactly what was involved in printing a book in the 1830s. Everything was set by hand, inked by hand... cut folded assembled glued and finished... by hand. No electric drive, no air-assist, no hydraulics.

There was a small letter-press shop operating a reproduction of the printing press on display at the Mormon site. The owner was a Mormon and printed church materials and custom work as well. I think it's still there too.. haven't been in the village of Palmyra proper in a few years.


It's a neat site to visit if you don't mind the Faith According To Mormon Tradition lecture as you go through the exhibits. ;) Doesn't bother me at all because I am/was One Of Them. :D

John Stevenson
12-14-2010, 04:03 AM
No, nothing about the music or taste but it's louder than the narration.

In this case it's music with instructional background narration when it should be background music.

Totally spoilt it for me.

Lew Hartswick
12-14-2010, 08:50 AM
No, nothing about the music or taste but it's louder than the narration.

In this case it's music with instructional background narration when it should be background music.

Totally spoilt it for me.
I haven't watched it yet but I hardly ever have the speakers turned on. :-)
...lew...

madwilliamflint
12-14-2010, 10:35 AM
One of the weird advantages of living in NYC (and as I get older there are fewer and fewer) is that I was able to take a bunch of courses at The New York Center for Book Arts (http://centerforbookarts.org/) which, while a little heavy on the hippy-dippy quotient, was really enlightening and satisfying. They've got typesetting machines on site.

They're positively lovely.

Frank Ford
12-14-2010, 11:05 AM
THANKS for the memories!

My shop was right across the street from the Atherton's Typesetting Typography, where Sunset Magazine was made up on Linotype machines. One of the operators was a regular customer and he, like all of the, was a terrific mechanic - you had to be to keep the thing running smoothly. His union gave him early retirement because when the shop closed it was one of the only hot type businesses still running, and there clearly would be no more jobs.

Lots of anonymous newspaper articles have carried the byline, "ETAION SHRDLU." The keyboard of the Linotype has the letters arranged in descending order of how often they appear in the English language, and that's what you get if you run your finger down the first two columns of keys to test the machine.

I was fortunate to take a printing class at San Jose State in 1969 and work out a little bit on their Linotype - fun stuff!

BigMike782
12-14-2010, 11:45 AM
Man does that take me back to my high school days!(early 80s)
We had to learn the California job case and how to read a line gauge(don't even THINK of calling it a ruler!)we set our own type and ran a Kluge letterpress,made plates on a carbon arc plate maker and developed film by hand using a timer.
Then after 10 years of working as a 4 color stripper all those skills became useless.
Oh well time moves on:)

Circlip
12-14-2010, 11:56 AM
One or two crafts that the computer hasn't managed to replace yet then?

Regards Ian.

lynnl
12-14-2010, 12:12 PM
No, nothing about the music or taste but it's louder than the narration.

In this case it's music with instructional background narration when it should be background music.

Totally spoilt it for me.

I'm with you John.
Unfortunately that seems to have become the norm nowadays.
The attittude amongst the crowd producing this crap seems to be "Hey, we've got all of this high tech audio and video gimickry... seems a shame not to use it."
So they proceed to inundate what might otherwise be a meaningful, enjoyable presentation with a bunch of obscuring horse****.

I was watching a football game (NFL) over the weekend, and at every change of scene they displayed some flashing, brief video "swoosh" of some sort, that was neither entertaining nor enlightening - simply distracting, and it became all the more so after about the 300th time.
IDIOTS!

Mcgyver
12-14-2010, 12:24 PM
I'm with you John.
Unfortunately that seems to have become the norm nowadays.
The attittude amongst the crowd producing this crap seems to be "Hey, we've got all of this high tech audio and video gimickry... seems a shame not to use it."
So they proceed to inundate what might otherwise be a meaningful, enjoyable presentation with a bunch of obscuring horse****.



+1 its a particular form or purified idiocy that comes with a youtube account.....i can't figure out why all these twits thinking imposing their musical tastes enhances their video. Now this one was a pretty good video, but I agree, diy video producers please stop adding all the BS sound to these vids!


I was watching a football game (NFL) over the weekend, and at every change of scene they displayed some flashing, brief video "swoosh" of some sort, that was neither entertaining nor enlightening - simply distracting, and it became all the more so after about the 300th time.
IDIOTS!

+1. but you have to expect it more in that forum, their product is for most people and most people are idiots

rockrat
12-14-2010, 01:04 PM
Music or not, I did like the video. I have read about creating books that way but I have never seen it in action. It was interesting to see just how much work it took to make that book.

Thanks for the link.

rock~

RB211
12-14-2010, 02:59 PM
Thank god for PDF's

rohart
12-14-2010, 06:00 PM
My grandfather was a linotype oerator, so I'm going to have a good look at the video when I have time.

But I'm going to dread this noise ! Jeez, I hate all this pointless distracting unmusic.

In the old days, remember we used to get annoyed by muzak - that cloying organ solo that was fed through the department stores ? I could handle that nowadays. Heavy rap - no.

I guess all today's youngsters develop aural filters to screen out what they don't want to hear. I grew up thinking that is would be a good think to hone my senses so they worked. Fat lot of good that did me. Should have just filled the holes with putty.

Sorry - just needed a rant. I know this will be nice music - just too loud.

lynnl
12-14-2010, 07:36 PM
What scares me, is that it's not totally out of the realm of possiblity that the electronic/digital medium may one day nudge out printed matter entirely ...or nearly so.

I know, I know. It sounds far fetched, and it certainly isn't just around the corner. But "IF" somehow or other the profit gods smile heavily enough in the favor of such as e-books, etc., so that a critical mass is reached, then you never can tell.
Probably printed matter would not disappear altogether, but just become so expensive as to become a rarity.

I'm sure most people of my generation, or even all current adults, feel that there's nothing like a "real book", that you can hold in your hand, flip the pages ..either forward or backward, put on a shelf, pass along to the kids, etc. But those sentiments may pass in the next few generations.

smiller6912
12-14-2010, 11:07 PM
Man does that take me back to my high school days!(early 80s)
We had to learn the California job case and how to read a line gauge(don't even THINK of calling it a ruler!)we set our own type and ran a Kluge letterpress,made plates on a carbon arc plate maker and developed film by hand using a timer....
Me too, except try the 60's, I still think about that stuff, it was fun.
(does this ring a bell: ffi fl 5m 4m ' k j ? b c d e ! z l m n h x q v u t 3m)

BigMike782
12-15-2010, 11:40 AM
"What scares me, is that it's not totally out of the realm of possiblity that the electronic/digital medium may one day nudge out printed matter entirely ...or nearly so.

I know, I know. It sounds far fetched, and it certainly isn't just around the corner. But "IF" somehow or other the profit gods smile heavily enough in the favor of such as e-books, etc., so that a critical mass is reached, then you never can tell.
Probably printed matter would not disappear altogether, but just become so expensive as to become a rarity."

When I worked in the printing biz every job had a handmade keyline,negatives shot on a camera,was hand stripped,proofs made by hand and plates made by hand.We all thought there was no other way to do it and we would all have jobs in the same capacity the rest of our working days.Well now it goes from PC direct to press and most of that changed in 10 years time.
Sadly I can forsee the day that hard copy books won't be printed anymore....I like to read online but I also enjoy picking up a book or magazine to read.

RB211
12-15-2010, 02:27 PM
"What scares me, is that it's not totally out of the realm of possiblity that the electronic/digital medium may one day nudge out printed matter entirely ...or nearly so.

I know, I know. It sounds far fetched, and it certainly isn't just around the corner. But "IF" somehow or other the profit gods smile heavily enough in the favor of such as e-books, etc., so that a critical mass is reached, then you never can tell.
Probably printed matter would not disappear altogether, but just become so expensive as to become a rarity."

When I worked in the printing biz every job had a handmade keyline,negatives shot on a camera,was hand stripped,proofs made by hand and plates made by hand.We all thought there was no other way to do it and we would all have jobs in the same capacity the rest of our working days.Well now it goes from PC direct to press and most of that changed in 10 years time.
Sadly I can forsee the day that hard copy books won't be printed anymore....I like to read online but I also enjoy picking up a book or magazine to read.
Nothing is safe or sacred anymore.
Evolve with times or be made obsolete.

Polygon
12-15-2010, 04:35 PM
I come across those printing blocks at flea markets sometimes and am always curious about how they were used, and if they will ever be used again.