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sasquatch
12-24-2010, 08:59 PM
Wondering,, how many of you have a metal working club in your,e area, and how many here are members of the same?

Bob Farr
12-24-2010, 09:30 PM
I'm a member of the Metro Detroit Metalworking Club. We meet the second Wed of every month at 7pm at the Macomb County Community College. I'm not sure exactly how many members there are, but usually about 20 show up at the meetings. It's a nice group of talented people who have been very generous in sharing their knowledge with newcomers like me.

Bob

PixMan
12-24-2010, 09:55 PM
Up here in the New England area we have the New England Model Engineering Society (NEMES) and most members seem to have at least a small home shop. Others are current commercial shop owners, retired mechanical and/or electrical engineers, tinkerers, etc. I've been to some of their events and had great fun.

I'm not a member mainly because with my work schedule I know I wouldn't be able to attend the monthly meetings at the Charles River Museum of Industry and Innovation in Waltham MA. Plus, to paraphrase the words of Groucho Marks, I wouldn't belong to any club who would have the likes of someone like me as a member.

gr8life
12-24-2010, 11:44 PM
I live in Las Vegas, that is in Nevada for those of you in foreign lands. We have casinos, shows, conventions, tourists, mountains, snow, a big lake (slightly down at the moment) and about 35,000,000 (that's million) tourists. But no metal working club. A sad state of affairs.
thanks
Merry Christmas
ed

Brett Hurt
12-25-2010, 12:08 AM
I live in Bakersfield CA and there are no clubs, wish there where my be a few guys in town!! Brett very lonely

winchman
12-25-2010, 04:06 AM
I live in Thomasville, GA. If you gathered together everyone who knows what a lathe is, you might be able to start a club.

John Stevenson
12-25-2010, 05:57 AM
With the UK being so small there are quite a few clubs, usually called Model Engineering Societies, there are 3 within 15 miles of me.

Problem with the UK ones is, most are based on council land which is rented and virtually all have a miniature railway running round it and these give rides to the public.
They need to do this to pay rent on the ground and buildings.

The end result is that these clubs are very, very train orientated and if you are not building one or prepared to help on on club days you don't fit in.

I have nothing against trains or similar models, they just don't get my steam up.

The nearest club to me has their club nights in a local pub but only in the winter months, summer club nights are spent at the track so out of 5 club nights in winter I could attend one is reserved for the AGM, one is a ladies night so it means you join up, pay subs for 3 nights out of a year.

On those three nights they show films and have talks and usually one or two of those are steam / train related.

Bob Farr
12-25-2010, 08:05 AM
*** The nearest club to me has their club nights in a local pub ***

Sounds good to me! The Detroit area club managed a successful club engine build last year and showed this fine running little compressed-air radial at NAMES 2010:

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/MDMCclubbuild2010.jpg

oil mac
12-25-2010, 10:06 AM
Hello all.
Over here as John says, we have in the U.K. Model Engineering Societies &clubs, Many of these are absolutely excellent, I was a member of one many years ago, which unfortunately due to the passing over of many of the elderly members, + the landlord of the building "taking a greater intrest in Model Engineering" E.G. hiking up the rent to an eye watering dizzy height, it went burst
Some years back i was in another which was pretty good , The guys by and large were really good craftsmen, In fact it was the best pub, with no beer i have ever been in, Saying that in clubs one gets upon occasions, a committee (frequently a Scottish malaise, Nothing works without a committee) By and large it was alright, but in the latter years, One found the members of the same august body of men, rarely if ever joined the peasantry on the shop floor ! "Hey guys, the rank and file members, butchering the odd portion of metal, are what it was all about" Getting together citizens with a common bond of making things, discussing things, falling out etc, A portion of lifes rich tapestry.
The same committee had all sorts of files --Track manager, Workshop manager, etc, In fact i upon occasions used to wonder if i was in a high powered subsiduary of British Aerospace, B.P. or some other high grade concern.
Saying that the guys held it all together, until after very many years a new venue as a meeting room had to be found, Needless to say the club moved to a second venue, where everybody sits in a circle in a draughty hall, No thanks, something like the scenario i have always dreaded might happen in the latter years of my existance, So i never rejoined.
What does one get out of such an organisation, only what one puts in, I met some really nice skilled guys, two of whom i am friends with yet, Sadly a third passed away in the last two years.

As regards societies, there is one 10 minutes from my home, But i would not join it, No way, I just dont like the ethos generated by one "King Bee," No man is an island but unless somewhere like your New England Society, which looks like a common sense outfit comes along in these sunny but cold climes (at the moment) I personally will soldier on alone.

metalmagpie
12-25-2010, 12:08 PM
We have a mostly-online club here in Seattle, which is whimsically called Seattle Metalheads Society. We do get together sometimes and do various things - blacksmithing demos, cooking, flea marketing. We also teach classes sometimes.

metalmagpie

lakeside53
12-25-2010, 12:22 PM
We have a mostly-online club here in Seattle, which is whimsically called Seattle Metalheads Society. We do get together sometimes and do various things - blacksmithing demos, cooking, flea marketing. We also teach classes sometimes.

metalmagpie
We also borrow beg, lend, help, sell, buy, and aquire.... and have long threads about concrete, spraying adhesive and just about anything anyone wants to discuss.. A very diverse group; several hundred members and only a handful of "characters" :)

Thanks MM for letting me in:D

AllThumbz
12-25-2010, 12:54 PM
There was a group on Long Island, not too far from me, in Suffolk County, the Long Island MetalWorkers Society (LIMS), but they are in transition now, looking for people in the area with interest to help them find direction and continue.

They have a google group set up if anyone nearby is interested:

http://groups.google.com/group/limws


Best,

Nelson

Mark K
12-25-2010, 01:40 PM
One of the earliest in the US is Houston's Home Metal Shop Club.

http://homemetalshopclub.org/

Great bunch, lots of talent and creativity, open to all, including folks from out of town. No emphasis on live steam, though not discouraged of course. Meetings are great, but the site has articles and access to the monthly newsletters if attendance can't be managed.

I'm about 3.5 hours west, but used to commute to Houston for flying and always tried to work in a meeting visit. I don't fly any more and I miss the club.

Mark

scmw
12-25-2010, 03:14 PM
I'm between Kankakee and Champaign, IL. Each is an hour away. Lafayette, IN is an hour away too. I sure wish we had something in our area.

oil mac
12-25-2010, 04:17 PM
Possibly a pertinant question from you folks in the American/Canadian model/home shop scene,

i remember in the 1950/s, reading some publications from the United States, I think it may have been American Machinist? But i was struck by the large locomotive models which were illustrated therein, In the U.K. at that time most model engineers were constructing their loco,s in three and a half inch guage, Occasionally five inch guage, Was even immediately post war, the tendency for the United States modelers to go for larger sized models, Discuss.

paulp
12-25-2010, 07:46 PM
I'm a member of the Metro Detroit Metalworking Club. We meet the second Wed of every month at 7pm at the Macomb County Community College. I'm not sure exactly how many members there are, but usually about 20 show up at the meetings. It's a nice group of talented people who have been very generous in sharing their knowledge with newcomers like me.

Bob

What building and room at Macomb College?

Bob Farr
12-25-2010, 09:30 PM
What building and room at Macomb College?

Paul,

There's a glassed-in informal meeting room which is in the courtyard space between buildings T and R. The usual suspects start gathering at around 6:30pm, and we usually get started at about 7pm. It's a very friendly group. Stop by and introduce yourself, I'm the bearded fat guy in the black ball cap :)

Bob

mlucek
12-25-2010, 09:49 PM
Here in southern California, there is a metal working club called :

Southern California Home Shop Machinists

www.schsm.org

The group meets 1st Sat of the month. There's a lot of talented folks in this group too !

Everyone is welcome.

RobbieKnobbie
12-25-2010, 10:36 PM
I'm from the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania area. I haven't been able to find any clubs around here, and I'm neither social nor motivated enough to start one.

I used to travel to CT a lot for work, so I considered joining a club that's up there. IIRC they meet monthly in different member's homes - that sounded like a great idea for a small group and if I ever were forced to start a club that's how I'd model it.

snowman
12-25-2010, 11:36 PM
I'm the bearded fat guy in the black ball cap :)


It's a bunch of hobby machinists. Isn't that like saying, "I'm the white guy in a t shirt" at the Nascar race?

techonehundred
12-26-2010, 01:03 AM
SCMW. I am in Warrenville, IL and we have the Chicago Model Engine Association that meets in La Grange. I would be glad to get you that info if it is close enough.

metalmagpie
12-26-2010, 07:15 AM
I'm surprised nobody from Portland, Oregon is chiming in to tout their club, which puts on GEARS (a show at Kliever Armory) every year.

Bob Farr
12-26-2010, 08:00 AM
*** I'm the bearded fat guy in the black ball cap

It's a bunch of hobby machinists. Isn't that like saying, "I'm the white guy in a t shirt" at the Nascar race?

The MDMC is mostly made up of retired skilled tradesmen. The door to their club is open to the curious, and they generously share their kowledge with anyone showing a genuine interest. They're good people and great craftsmen, t-shirts or otherwise.

Your thoughtless, superficial comment reminds me of another thread:


As for the rude comments, there are a lot of people here who are obviously better suited for practical machinist, where the crabby burnt out professionals hang out.

Your glib 'bunch of hobby machinists' comment added nothing positive to this discussion.

snowman
12-26-2010, 09:39 AM
Sorry Bob...just poking fun. It seems like a large majority of the guys I see at Names or any of the old tractor shows or the like seem to have a very stereotypical appearance, regarldess of age or geometrical body features. All have a certain feel that implies that they wouldn't be out of place teaching the general population from the machine shops in greenfield village, or driving a steam locomotive. No insult was intended, nor deserved.

I took my wife to NAMES the first time I went. I think she may have had more fun than I did! She likes the trains, and was a daycare teacher. It was quite amazing to me how willing everyone was to talk to her, and even invite her and her class out for a ride on the scale loco's.

I am hoping to start attending the meetings once my life slows down a little bit. One question though, how late do the meetings generally last? I would be going to the meeting prior to going to work.

GadgetBuilder
12-26-2010, 09:44 AM
Because there wasn't a nearby machinist group, a friend and I started a small group in Connecticut, CTHSM, where we alternate meetings between our two shops (although we're open to other members hosting meetings), see:
http://www.gadgetbuilder.com/WesternCT_HSM.html

It's an informal group whose members skill level and interests vary broadly. We generally have a presentation on a machining topic of interest to the group and members are encouraged to bring projects or tools for discussion. Since we meet in our shops we can sometimes answer member questions by demonstration. In addition, members sometimes get together between meetings to work on things, solve problems, or shop for machinery and material.

Our group has worked out well so I'd encourage others from areas which lack a group to start one - you'll meet lots of interesting people and learn something new along the way.

John

lazlo
12-26-2010, 10:01 AM
I'm the bearded fat guy in the ball cap
It's a bunch of hobby machinists. Isn't that like saying, "I'm the white guy in a t shirt" at the Nascar race?

Oh man, I lost my coffee over that -- thanks Snowman! :D

Bob Farr
12-26-2010, 10:19 AM
Sorry Bob...just poking fun. *** I am hoping to start attending the meetings once my life slows down a little bit. One question though, how late do the meetings generally last? I would be going to the meeting prior to going to work.

Ok, fair enough, I guess I'll add 'thin skinned' to my own 'fat w/ballcap' description. I need improve each of those characteristics :o

The meetings are pretty informal. People drop in and out as their schedules allow. The group usually start thinning down around 9pm, with the heavier 'BS'ing' lasting until about 10pm. Stop in for a visit and see if it's for you. Visitors are always welcome and there is something for everyone. Several of the members have backyard casting equipment and it is a common topic. IC, steam, modeling, CNC, etc.

Bob

lazlo
12-26-2010, 10:37 AM
Ok, fair enough, I guess I'll add 'thin skinned' to my own 'fat w/ballcap' description.

Blacksmiths have a similar "uniform": plaid shirt and suspenders. Go to an ABANA event and it's a sea of plaid and suspenders :)

By the way, we have a pretty sizable group in the Austin Metalworking Club. We meet at the Rudy's on North 183 on the second Wednesday of every month. Drop me a PM or visit the Yahoo Group if you're interested (Hint, Hint: Byron and KidZimaHater :) ):

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/AustinMetalworkingEtc/

J Tiers
12-26-2010, 10:49 AM
Nothing in St Louis that I know of.

There was one gathering last summer at a local joint. About 5 guys showed up, very nice folks, but you really need a larger group to get far.

With a very small group there isn't enough variety and diversity to keep interest up. of course with a really big group it's unwieldy and fragmented.

I figure about 15 to 25 folks is about ideal. While I have been a member of some smaller groups (other subjects) they tend to be poor at self-sustaining. Usually a small group is held together by one person, and in the long run people move, have medical or family issues come up, etc. When that occurs with the "group leader", it goes flop in a hurry.

For those in a club/group, how many members are there in your club/group?

Do you meet in a specific place every time?

What kind of place do you meet in?

Tim Clarke
12-26-2010, 11:35 AM
EVME... Emerald Valley Model Engineeres. The Eugene-Springfield area of Oregon. Check out our website, www.evmeclub.com

TC

loose nut
12-26-2010, 01:41 PM
Possibly a pertinant question from you folks in the American/Canadian model/home shop scene,

i remember in the 1950/s, reading some publications from the United States, I think it may have been American Machinist? But i was struck by the large locomotive models which were illustrated therein, In the U.K. at that time most model engineers were constructing their loco,s in three and a half inch guage, Occasionally five inch guage, Was even immediately post war, the tendency for the United States modelers to go for larger sized models, Discuss.


Years ago 3 1/2 and 4 3/4 where popular but bigger engines have mostly taken over, more so in the US then in Canada. New England and eastern Canada use mostly 7 1/4" same as Britain but the rest of NA use 7 1/2". A typo way back when got things a bit confused and by the time anyone noticed it was to late to change. 7 1/2" track in 1.6" scale has now become popular because it gives a true scale engine and is a bit bigger for the same size track.

You find the odd 5" track where there are a lot of Brit expats have formed a club and some of the bigger clubs still have a 2 1/2" track but not many. There is also a garden gauge following.

Gas engines seem to be more popular now than steam, that may be because people have to travel farther here to get to a track so it is easier to go trackless. Traction engines on the other hand seem to be very popular.

airsmith282
12-26-2010, 02:06 PM
Wondering,, how many of you have a metal working club in your,e area, and how many here are members of the same?

lets start one up here in north bay and then will put the word out on kiji and see what happens what do you think

:D

KiloBravo
12-26-2010, 02:21 PM
I'm from the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania area. I haven't been able to find any clubs around here, and I'm neither social nor motivated enough to start one.

I used to travel to CT a lot for work, so I considered joining a club that's up there. IIRC they meet monthly in different member's homes - that sounded like a great idea for a small group and if I ever were forced to start a club that's how I'd model it.

Well I'm in West Chester PA, so if you get one going count me in. However, between work and raising young kids my machining time is very limited these days.

AllThumbz
12-26-2010, 06:51 PM
Do you guys see any value in an online club given the fact that machining really is something you need to observe, and given that there are forums like this one that you can frequent to see projects others have made and ask questions?


Nelson

sasquatch
12-26-2010, 07:32 PM
My area could certainly use a club of this topic. There are presently two groups in this area one is strictly railroad, the other is strictly Small aircraft builders and flyers.
Re: Were to hold meetings:
As mentioned a shop would be great, especially as stated for demonstration purposes.
Back a few years ago i belonged to a group of "Off Gridders", we met once a month, and each meeting was held at a different members shop, to see what he was up to, (most of these guys were all homeshop tinkers at just about anything imaginable,) so meeting somewere different was great, and no one was put out all the time to hold a meeting and supply a few snacks and coffee etc after.
But Alas,,, after sometime, as often happens two members who thought they knew it all caused a bit of problems, defeating the whole purpose of an information meeting.
Re: "Online Club:--- i,m thinking this great group right here on this site are about as close as anyone could get to that.
Tons of information, photo,s of projects and "How Too,s: And some great humerous postings and replies.

RobbieKnobbie
12-26-2010, 07:45 PM
Yup, this forum is about as close to an online club as I've seen... except you can shut out the know-it-alls with the ignore button. You can't do that when you're all packed into someone's garage.

KiloBravo: You're about an hour from me (Lower Bucks Co) and if I were to start (or even find) a club I'll be sure to let you know. I suffer from the same issues, three little ones and a career. Only 27 years to retirement!!!

AllThumbz
12-26-2010, 08:29 PM
Similar problem here...3 teenagers, a family, and a job...

The local club was a long drive out onto Long Island, so of course I never made it to the meetings, and now it's future is uncertain...ARGH! It's no wonder a fella can't learn anything!


Nelson

Astronowanabe
12-26-2010, 09:00 PM
Wondering,, how many of you have a metal working club ...?

Round here we call them "Hammers" :D

Sorry had to do that, but seriously, I'm another TC in the EVME.

oil mac
12-27-2010, 11:35 AM
Hi Loosenut
Thanks for info, Somehow i think, from the posts there are more folk beavering away in their own home shops In the Canada/United States scene, than in clubs, I suppose it must be due to geographical location of these folk and size of your continent.

Two or three times over here i have been flamed for being more intrested in "The machines that make the machines &models" than products turned out, Whereas over the pond, you guys seem to have more of a real love of your traditional home grown machine tools, than over here With rare exceptions

EddyCurr
12-27-2010, 01:16 PM
I remember in the 1950/s, reading some publications from the United States,
I think it may have been American Machinist? But I was struck by the large
locomotive models which were illustrated therein, In the U.K. at that time
most model engineers were constructing their loco,s in three and a half inch
guage, Occasionally five inch guage, Was even immediately post war, the
tendency for the United States modelers to go for larger sized models,
Discuss.Although I do not participate in the scale train hobby, I am aware of an
active group of enthusiasts in my part of the world. They have a dedicated
facility with trackage a distance south of me.


Ironhorse Park (http://www.ironhorsepark.net/)


Wondering. How many of you have a metal working club in your area, and
how many here are members of the same?I am a comparatively new participant in a loose group of metal enthusiasts
spread over Western Canada area who collaborate via a listserve board.
Those who are in physical proximity to one another meet up and help each
other out in person.

.

loose nut
12-27-2010, 03:44 PM
Hi Loosenut
Thanks for info, Somehow i think, from the posts there are more folk beavering away in their own home shops In the Canada/United States scene, than in clubs, I suppose it must be due to geographical location of these folk and size of your continent.

Two or three times over here i have been flamed for being more intrested in "The machines that make the machines &models" than products turned out, Whereas over the pond, you guys seem to have more of a real love of your traditional home grown machine tools, than over here With rare exceptions

I would agree with you on the love of old machine tools, might be a reaction to the changes in the world and the replacement of traditional machining with CNC. Not everyone sees that as a plus.

There are a lot of "lone hands", as I believe you call them in the UK, over here. In southern Ontario I know of only about 6 or so clubs in an area bigger then England and Scotland combined with 1/6th of the population. I would think that in the UK there would be dozens if not over a hundred clubs for the same sized area. The population density in relation to "model engineers/Home machinists" is just to low in most areas to warrant formation of a club. That sucks.

In our local club we have one member that drives over 100 miles to come to meetings and several more that travel 50 or more. Traveling some distance to do things is just a fact of life in many parts of NA.

randyjaco
12-27-2010, 07:53 PM
I am a member of the Houston Home Metal Shop Club. As Laslo said, it is a great group of diversified shop people. It was probably one of the first such clubs formed. http://homemetalshopclub.org/
For those of you out of the Houston area HMSC has a Yahoo Group "Tinkering" which does not require HMSC membership. I probably enjoy Tinkering more than the club meetings. It is a great way to get feedback quickly; as meetings are 24/7.

Randy