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tmc_31
12-30-2010, 10:57 PM
Hi all,

Well, by the time I went to town this morning to get the stuff to make a new 220V extension cord for the bandsaw and a few other items for my project, it was about 3:00PM before I was able to start using my new saw. As some of you may have read in a prior thread, I took delivery of a new Turn-Pro 7X12 Gear Head Bandsaw from Enco yesterday afternoon. I took a couple of test cuts (dry) yesterday just to see if it would work. I was initially impressed. It cut very quickly and very straight compared to my old 4X6.

Today, I gave it a real test. I needed to saw 50-3" dia X 1" blanks out of a 20' bar of A36 steel. The first issue was that in trying to dilute my coolant (20:1 ratio) I needed to know what the capacity of the coolant reservoir was. Now this seem like a simple thing right? But no, it is not listed in the manual nor is it stamped on the tank. So I call Enco tech support. The nice lady there said they didn't know, the question had come up before but they still didn't have an answer. So I measured in 12 quarts of water to fill the tank to the brim. Book says fill to 80% of tank capacity. Coolant capacity of the tank is...wait for it... 10 quarts. I called Enco Tech support back and gave them the results of my research so they could pass it on to the next inquiring mind.

So, I made the first cut, it took 3min 2sec to finish. I checked the parallelism of the faces, they were about .002 out. The 25th cut (as far as I got tonight) took 3min 8sec and was about .001 out of parallel. I did some spot checking as I went along and found one blank that had a bump in it, don't know if it was just a hard spot or what but the faces were about .040 out. ( I will have to face that one). The rest seem to be fairly parallel (by mark I eyeball). The cycle time is the time from the beginning of one cut to the beginning of the next cut was 3min 33sec ( I had cut off a 30" chunk of bar to cut the blanks out of so I could handle it easily). I have been using the carbon steel blade that came with the saw. I won't install the new bi-metal blade until I see a significant reduction in cutting speed or accuracy.

Before I started cutting this afternoon, I checked the blade tension (per the operators manual as I don't have access to a tension-er). I also (per the manual) checked the weight on the bow with a fishing scale (recommended weight: 12-15lbs). Both of these items were correct out of the box with no adjustments required.

It looks like this saw is going to be a keeper:D

I know I know, I bought the saw so I have to like it right? Well, maybe that factors into it somewhat but given that, I have tried to be as objective in my reporting as possible.

I hope this finds all of you well and is helpful to some

Tim

Ken_Shea
12-30-2010, 11:02 PM
Just purchased that same saw, so your good report is good news to me.

Arthur.Marks
12-30-2010, 11:37 PM
Coolant capacity of the tank is...wait for it... 10 quarts. I called Enco Tech support back and gave them the results of my research so they could pass it on to the next inquiring mind.

You're awesome. 'love it!! :p I wish there was a "thumbs up" smiley here!

gordsgarage
12-31-2010, 12:06 AM
Thanks Tim for the great review. It sounds like you are having no issues at all, that's good to hear. Your information has put me one step closer to getting one for myself.

Gord

gda
12-31-2010, 07:27 AM
Congrats on the upgrade!

duckman
12-31-2010, 10:52 AM
I'm not raining on your parade but if you want to check your cut first make a cut and then turn the bar 180 and make another cut and then mike it, right now your making a parallel cut but it may not be square to the axis. JMHO and $.0362 worth (marked for inflation). :D :D

gnm109
12-31-2010, 11:17 AM
Good report. I have about a three gallon capacity in my Wal-Mart plastic storage box which is now my coolant tank. I don't use much more than 2 gallons and I mix about 8 oz. of Mobil soluble oil with it. I also put in a cup of Lysol to keep the bugs down.

I run my saw on low speed all of the time. I'm never in a hurry and it seems to cut nicely on both steel and aluminum that way. On low speeds with plenty of coolant, blades will last a very long time.

My motor is a 1 hp TECF 120/240 V unit and I run it on 120. I've run it on both voltages and it doesn't seem to make any difference. On 120V I can move it around the barn to various locaton since I don't have 240 V outlets on both walls.

My experience has been that I can always get close to .002 to .004 variation on a 2-3" cut. That's plenty good enough for me. Of course, you have to allow a bit more for this variation so that you can face your parts but that's to be expected.

I've seen some larger saws with extremelly large blades that will practically cut to zero. My friend the machinist has a very large automatic horizontal bandsaw. It's programmable and uses a 2" blade. I recently needed a 20', 1" X 2.5" HRS bar cut into 2-3/4 chunks for sidecar clamps that I make and he offered to let me use it. It took about 3 minutes per cut but it advances itself and drops the pieces into a box. All of the parts were less than .001 variation. We only needed a 1/64th extra to be sure. That saw has a 25 gallon coolant tank. He's not sure if there's any flora or fauna in there but it seems to work. LOL.

The Turn-Pro is a good saw. Thanks for the report.

metalmagpie
12-31-2010, 12:42 PM
I also have a Turn-Pro 7x12" saw, gearhead. Happy with it. I've had US made bandsaws for my previous couple (Wellsaw 58B, W.F. Wells L-9) but this one came to me free and although it's an import I decided to give it a try. I like it a lot. Wish the wheels swiveled at one end, but I found if you stand the saw up in the vertical position before moving it that it unweights the wheels at the far end enough so it's easy to skid them around a corner to steer.

metalmagpie

tmc_31
12-31-2010, 01:27 PM
Good morning all,

I got out early this morning and cut the last 25 blanks + 2 to practice power threading on. The final cut on #52 took 3min 6sec. The faces were .004 out of parallel.

All in all I am very happy with the saw. So far I only have 2 gripes. 1, the saw is not tall enough. I am going to have to raise it enough where the table is at the same level as my welding stands at their lowest level. 2, as metalmagpie says the wheels don't swivel making the saw hard to maneuver around in the shop. Metalmagpie, thanks for the idea about lifting the saw bow to make it easier to maneuver. The wheels that came on the saw are kind of cheesy, so I think I will install 4 new 5" metal casters with brakes and the front two swiveling. This should raise the saw enough to make it level with my welding stands, make it easier to move around in the shop and make it more stable with the caster brakes locked. I will also install a pull handle.

For me, this saw is going to be a very good value, I give it a very high marks along with Enco.

Duckman,

you are right, I did not swap the stock end for end to make my test cuts. I did however check the faces with a machinists square. Both faces seem to be fairly square with the axis. When I get back from the kids house on Sunday I will try the test you suggest.


Thanks for reading and your comments and suggestions.

Tim

gnm109
12-31-2010, 01:48 PM
Good morning all,

I got out early this morning and cut the last 25 blanks + 2 to practice power threading on. The final cut on #52 took 3min 6sec. The faces were .004 out of parallel.

All in all I am very happy with the saw. So far I only have 2 gripes. 1, the saw is not tall enough. I am going to have to raise it enough where the table is at the same level as my welding stands at their lowest level. 2, as metalmagpie says the wheels don't swivel making the saw hard to maneuver around in the shop. Metalmagpie, thanks for the idea about lifting the saw bow to make it easier to maneuver. The wheels that came on the saw are kind of cheesy, so I think I will install 4 new 5" metal casters with brakes and the front two swiveling. This should raise the saw enough to make it level with my welding stands, make it easier to move around in the shop and make it more stable with the caster brakes locked. I will also install a pull handle.

For me, this saw is going to be a very good value, I give it a very high marks along with Enco.

Duckman,

you are right, I did not swap the stock end for end to make my test cuts. I did however check the faces with a machinists square. Both faces seem to be fairly square with the axis. When I get back from the kids house on Sunday I will try the test you suggest.


Thanks for reading and your comments and suggestions.

Tim


It sounds like it's working very well. Yeah, they are too low from the factory. I also needed to add a better pan under mine to drain the coolant back into the coolant tank. I made one from 3/16" steel with rolled edges to hold the coolant. I changed the one in the first picture to the one shown in the second picture. You can also see the homemade coolant tank.

I also raised my saw 4" with steel panels that I welded up when I refurbished it. I also added wheels that swivel on one end. Here are pics. With those changes, my saw is now modernized.

Here are two pics.

During refurb.

http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r188/gnm109/Machinery/EncoSaw1Big.jpg

Finished item, ready to go.

http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r188/gnm109/Machinery/EncoRebuildF-1.jpg

Errol Groff
12-31-2010, 02:40 PM
Duckman said:

I'm not raining on your parade but if you want to check your cut first make a cut and then turn the bar 180 and make another cut and then mike it, right now your making a parallel cut but it may not be square to the axis. JMHO and $.0362 worth (marked for inflation).


Then TMC 31 replied;

you are right, I did not swap the stock end for end to make my test cuts. I did however check the faces with a machinists square. Both faces seem to be fairly square with the axis.

+++++

I am not visualizing this very well. I saw it as Duckman suggesting the the stock be rotated axially in the vise after the first cut, not end for end.

OK I just sketched it in CAD and if the saw is cutting at an angle and you rotate the stock axially in the vise and make a second cut you will wind up with a wedge shaped piece.

Errol Groff

Forrest Addy
12-31-2010, 05:21 PM
Good review that compares veery well with my experence when I bought my step pulley model 12 years ago. Since then I've cut tons of stuff, bar stock, structural shapes, 8" dia cast iron (cut from each side), straight cuts, miter cuts, funny angles, detail cuts. I've jigged and cut contours. rassled long lengths and used up blades on rail and axels. Through it all the saw soldiered on without a hitch.

I suggest you think twice about raising your saw. I fequently contour cut with the frame verticals. I lke my confort. I remove the movable jaw and plop a thick cushon of dhop towels on the saw base casting for a comfy straddle seat. The table is a perfect height for a 6 ft 3" seated guy. If the saw was raised 4" the seating would be awkward. YMMV.

My saw table is a weenie thing I've been meaning to up-grade. If must not be too weenie because it never got to the top of my round tu-it list.

The wheels are a PITA but they work OK if you don't mind skid-steering it. I fon't move my saw much.

If I was going to upgrade the saw I'd move the rear wheels all the way back in line with the top of the frame when raised. It's kinda tippy with the frame up as is. I'd also use phenolic wheel casters. Rubber or urethane casters will load up with saw chips.

The drip pan doesn't extend far enough to catch coolant dripping from the raised frame. It needs coolant deflectors too. Coolant migrates along the work and drips off the ends. I've been going to add a second spout to flush chips off before they get rolled under the rear guides. They sometimes cake under the blade and screw up tracking on the band wheels.

All petty stuff. Best $700 I ever spend on import stuff. Saved me a ton of time and hassle.