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S&S_ShovelHead
01-31-2011, 02:03 AM
I want to set up my Grizzly G0602 10x22 lathe (http://www.grizzly.com/products/10-x-22-Bench-Top-Metal-Lathe/G0602) for milling. I will mostly be doing small, mild steel work where high precision isn't really needed. I was looking for some suggestions on possible set ups I could use on my lathe. Anyone know of milling attachments that will bolt up to the G0602?

dockrat
01-31-2011, 02:15 AM
Before I got my mill I cobbled up this contraption and bolted it to the cross slide to do a few slots.

http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh67/Dockrat1/IMGP0372Small.jpg

PeteF
01-31-2011, 03:05 AM
Ernie, that's pretty good actually. I was looking at doing something similar but knew I was getting a stand alone mill so haven't pursued it. I've seen an even more basic idea (in HSM or probably more likely MEW) of simply a table on the cross slide. Often when milling you may be able to do without one axis (in this case height), and the height of the table is simply set with variable length stand-offs. It may be good enough for your purpose until you can find a vertical slide.

Pete

Paul Alciatore
01-31-2011, 03:40 AM
There have been some good prior discussions on this subject here. Look at these:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=32892&highlight=milling+in+lathe

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/sho...=milling+lathe

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/sho...=milling+lathe

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/sho...=milling+lathe

And many more. Use the search function and enter "milling+lathe". Most are not specifically for your lathe, but the ideas are general.

hareng
01-31-2011, 08:25 AM
I used a vertical slide very similar to above in my early cant afford days.

It cost me long term though, minor cuts exerting that much back pressure on the carriage and slides, needed a full regrind and rebuild in no time so be carefull.

Black_Moons
01-31-2011, 10:14 AM
I tryed it.. cut 2 little slots, and was sick and tired of messing with it.
Really no compairson to a real mill. If you expect to do any more then cut a keyway/slot or two on your lathe, you will be highly disappointed.

hareng
01-31-2011, 12:57 PM
Apart from above that was a ball ache as well setting up to do one mill op then putting the thing back to do a turning job.

Still got the vertical slide somehere and would be tempted to find my old long boring between centres bars to half moon something out 4 lathes down the line.

firbikrhd1
01-31-2011, 12:59 PM
Palmgren makes milling attachments for lathes.

http://www.woodlathe.biz/product/Palmgren+15252+250V+Metalworking+Lathe+Attachment/B0006577GY/Tools/0/0

I have one for my Logan 10" lathe and have used the Atlas milling attachment on a 10" Atlas lathe. That said, using it is a work around at best. A lathe really isn't rigid enough to take cuts of much depth at all. It works but patience is required, therefore my sentiments are similar to Black_Moons. I do use mine occasionally for cross drilling shafts on center and it works very well for that. No way it can compete with a milling machine but better than nothing if you need to cut a keyway or slot and time is of no consequence.

Al Messer
01-31-2011, 02:03 PM
Being retired and having a whole lot more time than money, it is amazing what all you can do with a simple angle plate fastened to the compound by the lanthern toolpost. All you have to do is exercise thought and patience! Restrict your "wants" to fit the abilities of your machines.

mcskipper
01-31-2011, 06:20 PM
There is a 120 page book on just milling in a lathe

Wookshop Practice Series #5
If you look around the book can be had for under $15.00

DougA
01-31-2011, 07:52 PM
Here is a little milling attachment I made for my Atlas Lathe. Sold it with the lathe a few years ago.

http://s864.photobucket.com/albums/ab205/bandsawguy/Milling%20attachement/

I used a cheap drill press vise and made a draw bar for the collet to hold the endmills. I got a chunk of aluminum for free to make the base from and took the cross slide off and used it as the third axis. Worked OK but I only used it a couple times. I sure am glad I didn't buy the Atlas milling attachment. They go for some crazy prices on Ebay considering how little use they actually are.

Al Messer
01-31-2011, 08:01 PM
Yep! I've got it(Workshop series book) and highly reccomend it, especially to novices.

KEJR
01-31-2011, 09:01 PM
this is kind of off topic, but how do you like that lathe? I have a logan 10" and I am getting tired of the 0.750 spindle bore and all the room it takes up with its bulky rear belt drive system. Maybe some day I'll break down and buy a "real" lathe that can take 5C collets and be done with it!

KEJR

J Tiers
01-31-2011, 11:43 PM
Palmgren makes milling attachments for lathes.



yep I have one..... it 'works", and I keep it "just in case"...... but I could get rid of it to an eager newbie for probably $150......

I bought it when all I had was a lathe, but the shaper I bought took over for it really fast.

OK for Woodruff keys

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/jstanley/Palmgren.jpg

KEJR......

As you see, I also have a 10" Logan, but I don't have that drive nonsense....... Instead I have a modified Southbend drive... MUCH better.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/jstanley/belttog2.jpg

S&S_ShovelHead
02-01-2011, 01:45 AM
Thank for all the replies, Ill look into some of those attachments.

KEJR- I havnt had it for long and its my first so I dont really have anything to compare to, sorry.

vpt
02-01-2011, 09:00 AM
I also don't have a mill yet and use my mill attachment quite often. the atlas doesn't like it but it does its job.

http://img248.imageshack.us/img248/4562/millingtoolholder023.jpg

I built my entire qctp with the atlas lathe and mill attachment.

http://img175.imageshack.us/img175/7198/ebay010.jpg

J Tiers
02-01-2011, 09:41 AM
One thing about Atlas lathes which is really head and shoulders BETTER THAN LOGAN is the milling attachment.

Well, OK, it's really a SOUTHBEND style attachment modified to fit Atlas.......Never mind that, it's WAY WAY better.

Ther is really only ONE extra "joint" between the work and the carriage.... You have to have the swivel and the vertical slide, but after that, the only "joint" is the attachment to the crosslide.

The Atlas attachment also puts the work fairly close to the vertical line from the center of the mounting.

With the Logan attachment (they relied on Palmgren, and sold them in their catalog), you have, IN ADDITION, the connection to the compound, and the compound slide. The slide adds slop and wobble, while the attachment to the compound relies on an "L" bracket with some amount of flex and a substantial amount of built-in overhang, adding MORE flex, as well as leverage on the rest of the structure.

It is like having the toolbit stuck out 4"... you'd never willingly do that for any reasonable work, but the Palmgren attachment forces it.

The best way around that would be to set it on a post attached in place of the compound.

Oh, yes, you can definitely USE it, but you will see the Palmgren attachment bouncing and nodding as you work.

Probably it would work much better on a 15" Southbend or Sheldon, something with mass and stability. I have no doubt that is what it was designed for, not for lightweight home hobby machines. Of course, Southbend already had a far superior attachment, but.......

vpt
02-01-2011, 10:15 AM
Found a video of when I was milling out that tool holder. This is some of the quieter milling work on the atlas. :D

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P0vk2SQRQnQ&feature=mfu_in_order&list=UL

firbikrhd1
02-01-2011, 11:35 AM
yep I have one..... it 'works", and I keep it "just in case"...... but I could get rid of it to an eager newbie for probably $150......

I bought it when all I had was a lathe, but the shaper I bought took over for it really fast.

OK for Woodruff keys



As you see, I also have a 10" Logan, but I don't have that drive nonsense....... Instead I have a modified Southbend drive... MUCH better.


Your experience is about the same as mine. The shaper took over most things the milling attachment would have done. I still want to keep my milling attachment though for those "just in case" moments. One thing a shaper can't do is cross drill a shaft with extreme accuracy.

Your Southbend drive idea is good. I modified my Logan drive with shop made bearing blocks and ball bearings on the counter shaft. It made a big difference in how well it works so I have no objection to the Logan drive.

I also agree that the Atlas milling attachment is a better, more rigid setup. My Dad's lathe is an Atlas with that attachment and it definitely is more rigid than the Palmgren/Logan setup. I have considered making an adapter that allows me to remove the Logan compound and replace it with a solid block and attach the Palmgren attachment to the block. This would eliminate some height and one gibbed joint possibly making the setup nearly as rigid as the Atlas setup.

vpt
02-01-2011, 04:41 PM
Works good for keyways.

http://img207.imageshack.us/img207/3216/brakecoolers032.jpg

J Tiers
02-01-2011, 09:34 PM
I have considered making an adapter that allows me to remove the Logan compound and replace it with a solid block and attach the Palmgren attachment to the block. This would eliminate some height and one gibbed joint possibly making the setup nearly as rigid as the Atlas setup.

What would be extra-special cool might be to make the block with the L-bracket half of the swivel included.... that would eliminate the L-bracket and its extra flex, as well as one "joint" in the system.

You might be able to set the swivel part back a bit to reduce the "stick-out" as much as possible without hitting the carriage with the vise.

The Palmgren is really a "vise on a bracket", while the Atlas/Southbend is a bracket and slide with a clamp setup on it. The vise part is so large and clumsy that it seems to detract from the useability.

Al Messer
02-02-2011, 11:06 PM
this is kind of off topic, but how do you like that lathe? I have a logan 10" and I am getting tired of the 0.750 spindle bore and all the room it takes up with its bulky rear belt drive system. Maybe some day I'll break down and buy a "real" lathe that can take 5C collets and be done with it!

KEJR


What are the limits of the 3AT collets that the Logan uses? I do not have a collet attachment on my Logan, but I am very happy with every thing else, even the "change gear" gearbox.

Al

J Tiers
02-02-2011, 11:28 PM
What are the limits of the 3AT collets that the Logan uses? I do not have a collet attachment on my Logan, but I am very happy with every thing else, even the "change gear" gearbox.

Al

1/2 inch, for both the 3AT type and also the 3C that my Logan uses because I made an adapter.

http://www.loganact.com/tips/collet.htm

firbikrhd1
02-02-2011, 11:35 PM
What would be extra-special cool might be to make the block with the L-bracket half of the swivel included.... that would eliminate the L-bracket and its extra flex, as well as one "joint" in the system.

You might be able to set the swivel part back a bit to reduce the "stick-out" as much as possible without hitting the carriage with the vise.

The Palmgren is really a "vise on a bracket", while the Atlas/Southbend is a bracket and slide with a clamp setup on it. The vise part is so large and clumsy that it seems to detract from the useability.

Great ideas! Thanks. That's what I like about this site, many minds with various ideas culminating in something better that one person might come up with on their own.

Rex
02-03-2011, 03:01 PM
Those Atlas milling attachments are relatively plentifull still, and can be easily adapted to a Logan. You just have to turn a male-to-male adapter disk.

J Tiers
02-03-2011, 11:34 PM
Not for mine, I don't have the tapered spud thing, I have two t-nuts. Makes it easier.

The Logan my father-in-law sold had an adapted Atlas or Southbend milling attachment.

For a Logan, the t-slot crosslide would really make it easy to mount. Logan made a round spacer item to mount on those and hold a 4-way toolblock directly. A block for the Palmgren would work too.

Duffy
02-03-2011, 11:46 PM
Plaza Machinery has Logan T-slot cross slides for about $75.00 Nobody has mentioneed the kit for a milling attachment and a fixture block that is(was?) sold by Metal Lathe Accessories. I think his name is Andy Loftquist in Pine grove Mills, Pa.

J Tiers
02-04-2011, 01:05 AM
Yea, they look like some high-mass and pretty stable items. Evan used to use a somewhat similar item, if I recall correctly. I think his was aluminum, he seems to have an unending supply of aluminum, but it appeared to work well by his report.

S&S_ShovelHead
02-07-2011, 01:35 PM
I think Im going to go this route http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=24736&highlight=milling+lathe. I was going to use 3/4" 1018 like the Paul Aciatore. I was thinking making it a bit bigger than the cross slide, drilling and tapping numerous 3/8" holes and getting a 3/8" clamping kit. I have two questions, whats the best way to mount it to my cross slide (pics attached), will two bolts be rigid enough? Or should I remove the bolt that mounts the cross slide down and use that aswell? Or drill and tap some more holes in the cross slide? Also I want to make sure before I do any of this that I wont be putting too much stress on my lathe (ways, cross slide or spindle bearing).

http://i1198.photobucket.com/albums/aa457/Shea_G/P1000066.jpg
http://i1198.photobucket.com/albums/aa457/Shea_G/P1000065.jpg

dalee100
02-07-2011, 03:31 PM
Hi,

I think that would work well if you want to do some simple work like facing. It should have good rigidity. Maybe not quite so well if you want to put a keyway in the center of say, a .200" diameter shaft.

dalee

softtail
02-07-2011, 04:45 PM
Lathes.uk sells what looks like some really nice milling attachments under their Boxford parts page. Boxfords are SouthBend clones and the part looks like it could be adapted to many lathes. British made, two table sizes available.

http://www.lathes.co.uk/accessoriesnew/verticalslide.jpg


st

S&S_ShovelHead
02-08-2011, 10:51 AM
I think Im going to go this route http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=24736&highlight=milling+lathe. I was going to use 3/4" 1018 like the Paul Aciatore. I was thinking making it a bit bigger than the cross slide, drilling and tapping numerous 3/8" holes and getting a 3/8" clamping kit. I have two questions, whats the best way to mount it to my cross slide (pics attached), will two bolts be rigid enough? Or should I remove the bolt that mounts the cross slide down and use that aswell? Or drill and tap some more holes in the cross slide? Also I want to make sure before I do any of this that I wont be putting too much stress on my lathe (ways, cross slide or spindle bearing).

http://i1198.photobucket.com/albums/aa457/Shea_G/P1000066.jpg
http://i1198.photobucket.com/albums/aa457/Shea_G/P1000065.jpg

Any opinions?

Rex
02-08-2011, 11:25 AM
I suggest mounting one of these: http://www.littlemachineshop.com/products/product_view.php?ProductID=1664&category=

I would make every effort to use existing holes, but you would almost certainly need to drill and tap a few.
I would probably bolt down 4 corners, and also add a close-fitting spigot to fit the bored compound hole.

uncle pete
02-08-2011, 05:05 PM
One more point. While it's fairly rare in most cases, Think about objects that are too long or odd shaped that it would be a pain or impossible to set up in a lathe chuck for machining the ends. For example, Say you had a 3-4' long bar or shaft too big to fit thru the headstock bore that needed a drilled and tapped hole in the end, And needed at least a nod towards some form of accuracy. For your lathe that's just too long even if it could be set up Even with a vertical mill you'd have to rotate and tram the head to do this. A pretty time consuming job, Plus once it was done you'd need to retram the head back in once it was back to vertical. With a lathe milling attachment then that's really a very simple job. Use the milling attachment to set the vertical height, The cross slide to set that dimension and your good to go. I personaly think that any well equippted lathe should have a milling attachment. There are some jobs that it just makes things far easier even if you own a vertical mill. There's numerous other examples, But you get the idea.

Palmgren? There.............ok. I own one but it wouldn't stop me from finding or building better.

Pete

Al Messer
02-09-2011, 06:27 PM
I don't want to hijack the thread, but how about holding end mills in the lathe? I machined an Atlas type end mill holder with a Morse No. 3 taper for my Power Kraft. Prick punched a spot on the end of the spindle and a matching one on the holder so it could always be put in the same spot. I bored the holder to .375 inches and drilled and threaded a hole in the side for a 1/4"NC set screw. A drawbar was made to hold it in the spindle firmly. Since I do not do a lot of milling, a selection of end mills with .375" shanks fill the bill.

DougA
02-09-2011, 06:53 PM
On my Atlas I just bought a morse taper collet to go in the spindle and made up a drawbar to pull it tight. Worked fine for holding a 3/8 shank endmill.

Rex
02-09-2011, 07:19 PM
Most of us use collets, including in milling machines, but the correct tool is an endmill holder with a setscrew.
I've had endmills creep out of collets just enough to ruin a part.

Al Messer
02-09-2011, 10:36 PM
The cutters I use have a flat milled in the shank for the set screw to bear against. Once installed and the set screw tightened, cutters ain't gonna go no place!! Never owned any, but Atlas had the same type of holders to fit different diameters of shanks, or rather had various sized bushings to hold the cutters.

MarkBall2
02-10-2011, 12:00 AM
I've got a set of end mill holders I use on my Craftsman lathe. I need to get a 5/8" end mill holder, as the set I bought didn't come with that size.

Mine use a 1/2" x 13 drawbar I made from all thread & a knob on the end of it. I knurled the knob so I would only have to hand tighten.

I've since discovered after running work with the chuck, I need to clean & dry the spindle or the end mill holder will work it's way loose. Once clean & dry, it's tight & doesn't come loose.

J Tiers
02-10-2011, 12:02 AM
Most of us use collets, including in milling machines, but the correct tool is an endmill holder with a setscrew.
I've had endmills creep out of collets just enough to ruin a part.


So have I.

It's particularly bad if you do as many do, and hold the cutter in a regular lathe chuck. Hardened steel on hardened steel, won't hold worth a tinker's damn.

Ian B
02-10-2011, 07:35 AM
JT,

As you say, a proper endmill holder's the way to go. Snag is, a lot of people won't have an endmill holder with a shank that matched the lathe's spindle - all my milling tooling's INT40 or similar, I haven't seen a lathe with such an internal taper.

It;s on my 'to do' list to make an adapter to hold an INT40 shank in the lathe's spindle taper, with a drawbar. There's plenty of space - the mouth of the taper's about 70mm diameter.

Until then, for holding an endmill in a 3 jaw, how about a split bush of a softer material between the shank and the jaws?

Ian

dalee100
02-10-2011, 01:00 PM
Hi,

Probably wouldn't even need to slit the side. Just drill a piece of round stock for your end mill, then just drill and tap a cross hole to run a screw against the Weldon flat. If you use a socket head cap screw or even a hex head, it could also supply a " safety stop" against a chuck jaw to doubly prevent possible spinning.

dalee

Edit to add, I'm a gonna steal this idea. ;)

S&S_ShovelHead
02-17-2011, 09:37 PM
I got a mill table and mounted it to my cross slide. It worked great for the project I needed it for where I was really only working in one axis and controlled the height with spacers (accuracy wasn't needed). Ide now like to add a vertical axis. Any suggestions on the best way to do this? I was thinking I needed a vise with a slide attached to it and mount it perpendicular to the mill table.

http://i1198.photobucket.com/albums/aa457/Shea_G/IMG_0175.jpg

fciron
02-17-2011, 11:36 PM
How about an angle plate and your compound slide?

Angle plates are cheap and you can clamp other stuff to it as well.

dalee100
02-18-2011, 12:17 AM
Hi,

Angle plates are nice, but you would still be stacking up spacers to achieve proper height. Not necessarily the best to say mill a keyway on center of a shaft.

I've thought about it because I don't have a mill yet either. And try as I might, I can't get around not having a screw adjustable vice. I've done some searching. And I've found some prints of old time home-made setups. A couple look possible to make with nothing more than a lathe and a drill press. But I need to work out the details of how to make them in my head first. If they could bolt them to a 6x12 Atlas, I think I can make it work on my cheap doorstop.

dalee

fciron
02-18-2011, 12:49 AM
Hi,

Angle plates are nice, but you would still be stacking up spacers to achieve proper height. Not necessarily the best to say mill a keyway on center of a shaft.


Dalee, I was suggesting mounting the compound slide on the angle plate to get a height adjustment.

For cutting keyways, I made a fixture like this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eVgZol6Mfvo It uses a v-block at the lathe's center height, so all sizes of round stock are clamped in the center with one fixture.

S&S_ShovelHead
02-18-2011, 12:39 PM
What I need it a compound slide with a vise mounted to it. Does anyone know where I could find something like that?

dalee100
02-18-2011, 02:06 PM
Dalee, I was suggesting mounting the compound slide on the angle plate to get a height adjustment.

For cutting keyways, I made a fixture like this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eVgZol6Mfvo It uses a v-block at the lathe's center height, so all sizes of round stock are clamped in the center with one fixture.

Hi,

Excellent idea! I will be making one like that.:) It's quick, easy and handy. All things I like in tooling. I all ready have a little project involving some cross drilling of round stock that it would be great for.

I do want to get away from a mount on the compound and get it down on the cross slide. A much wider and more rigid mounting I think. It would be better able to withstand milling type forces. With less stress on the lathe itself.

dalee

fciron
02-18-2011, 07:22 PM
dalee, mine mounts on the cross slide. No need for the compound on that fixture. I should have put some angle braces or webs on it, there's a little flex if I push a drill too hard. What I really dug in the video is how he uses the lathe itself to do all the locating. That was one of those "Eureka!" moments, another way to KISS.

Shovelhead, look for a "milling attachment". Palmgren makes a new one SB and Logan both offered them back in the day. They also come up on ebay now and then.

garyphansen
02-18-2011, 08:08 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v371/garyphansen/IM000178.jpg

I mounted a vice to a Phase II AXA holder. It works better than the Atlas milling attachment I sold a few years ago. Gary P. Hansen

fciron
02-18-2011, 08:15 PM
I mounted a vice to a Phase II AXA holder. It works better than the Atlas milling attachment I sold a few years ago. Gary P. Hansen

You can even clamp small stuff directly in the tool holder. My AXA is great for 1/2" material. I assumed he was asking about a slide to mill in the vertical axis. (Z axis? I can never remember.)

S_J_H
02-18-2011, 08:24 PM
I want to set up my Grizzly G0602 10x22 lathe (http://www.grizzly.com/products/10-x...al-Lathe/G0602) for milling. I will mostly be doing small, mild steel work where high precision isn't really needed. I was looking for some suggestions on possible set ups I could use on my lathe. Anyone know of milling attachments that will bolt up to the G0602?

Have a good look at this link-
http://www.lathes.co.uk/globe/

My buddy Rube recently got one of those Globe attachments included with a Logan he bought.
Very cool old milling setup for the lathe.

I'm guessing Globe milling attachments are pretty rare now,
but a similar setup would make a nice project for the guy who has no room or money for a separate mill.

It might be possible to adapt old machine parts for such a project.
Search Ebay for pulleys, bearings, something suitable for a spindle, a slide etc.

Steve

RussZHC
02-18-2011, 08:45 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ys0mhMFwuk

for those who have not yet seen this restoration of the Globe milling "attachment"...I think so far there are three parts [anyone part of the Sheldon Yahoo! group, there are more stills up there]...and they do come up rarely on EBay or elsewhere

RussZHC
02-18-2011, 09:17 PM
For those interested [as a project its way, way beyond my capabilities right now] the Globe patent is US Pat # 2 386 461 so good details are available