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conlo
02-08-2011, 10:17 AM
A few years back , I read about a man who fixed an elevator motor that was stuck by soaking it in a motor oil . I forgot the brand name of the motor oil , and I would like to buy some again. Does anyone remember about this ?? It was not a regular penetrating oil. It came in a quart can or plastic bottle like regular motor oils.

JCHannum
02-08-2011, 10:47 AM
Marvel Mystery Oil perhaps. Red can with a vintage-ish looking label. Most ATF's will do the same thing.

justanengineer
02-08-2011, 12:09 PM
I have found that soaking bearings in a can of diesel for a few hours followed by a blast from the air nozzle is a very good method of cleaning out even the most solid grease. The bearings in my most recent project Atlas shaper were so solid I couldnt rotate any of the balls but a few hours later and it was running like a champ. Not sure how this would work if you were looking at soaking the entire motor however.

vincemulhollon
02-08-2011, 03:48 PM
A few years back , I read about a man who fixed an elevator motor that was stuck by soaking it in a motor oil .

I found out the hard way a long time ago, that if the laminations are not perfectly varnished (and they never are), they soak up oil like a sponge thru capillary action, and later learned that motor laminations often run hot enough to vaporize the oil into either a stink or occasionally a smoke. Moral of the story is keep the oil out of the laminations by all means possible... bearings only.

I have unstuck medium size motors by placing them in a kitchen oven set very low for about two hours. In nice cold weather like this you can hot-cold cycle them a couple times, and they promptly break free, no muss, no fuss, no damaged parts. I rationalized this by reading on the motor nameplate that it was rated to 130 centigrade, so I didn't feel too weird about cooking it at 220 F or so. If you only have a "A grade" 105 C motor, or an unrated Chinese motor, maybe that would be bad, think about it. I should write an article about the many fun filled uses for a kitchen oven in the shop (aside from cooking frozen pizza).

Video Man
02-08-2011, 04:34 PM
I believe you remember a reference in one of Guy Lutard's bedside readers about the guy who fixed the tight elevator bearings with Rislone...

conlo
02-08-2011, 08:16 PM
Yes, that was it RISLONE. Thank you

tdmidget
02-08-2011, 09:10 PM
Rislone is not a motor oil per se. Like STP it is basically a VERY high viscosity oil that is added to thicken engine oil to compensate for wear. No value as a penetrant whatsoever. It is thicker than honey.
Lota luck using snake oil remedies on things like elevators and airplanes. Don't do anything that is not specified and approved by the OEM. Lawyers will love you.

Silverback
02-09-2011, 05:06 PM
I don't know what is actually in Rislone, but STP is not an oil, it's a viscosity modifier like they add to oil, basically a long chain polymer that tends to stick to itself as the long chains slide past each other. When you add it to an oil in increases the viscosity kind of like adding spagetti to water (not really sticky, but makes it flow slower, sorry, bad analogy and explanation but hopefully you get the idea)

I've heard of all sorts of places to use the stuff (my father in law got me to try it in my drill press spindle, what a mistake), but I've never seen it do any good anyplace _except_ added to oil.

Willy
02-09-2011, 05:40 PM
It sounds like we may have a bit of confusion when referring to Rislone.

The thick, honey like consistency being referred to is probably Rislone oil treatment, much like STP oil treatment.

What I believe the OP means is Rislone engine treatment, totally different animal. I have used it many years ago in a fleet of beaters we received that had not seen an oil change for way too long. This product is a much lighter weight, easy flowing fluid.
Actually I usually don't believe in "mechanic in a can", but from what I witnessed in this case, it did perform exactly as advertised.

A page from Rislone describing this particular product.

http://www.barsproducts.com/100QR.htm

A.K. Boomer
02-09-2011, 06:04 PM
Yes different types of rislone, and also different types of rislone engine cleaner,
One of them you can leave in and run till your next oil change and the other you can only run for 5 minutes at idle:eek: Or it can "clean" the lobes right off our camshaft,
Im like you Willy, I don't believe in a mechanic in a can but I have used this stuff with good results.

aostling
02-09-2011, 06:11 PM
A page from Rislone describing this particular product.

http://www.barsproducts.com/100QR.htm

Amazing, who knew that Bars Leak was still being made? I haven't needed that since selling my 1960 Volvo PV544. Oh, wait -- I also used it in my 1965 Rover 2000.

J. Randall
02-09-2011, 10:53 PM
Amazing, who knew that Bars Leak was still being made? I haven't needed that since selling my 1960 Volvo PV544. Oh, wait -- I also used it in my 1965 Rover 2000.

I used bars leak in a 1964 Impala in 1968, it immediately plugged the heater core, but that was not what was leaking. Never used it since.
James

Mike Burch
02-09-2011, 11:36 PM
Half a century ago, when "Volkswagen" meant only "weird-looking highly unstable air-cooled horseless carriage" the Volkswagen Owners' Club was regarded with a degree of condescension by other local car club members who owned actual motor cars.
So we used to give a bottle of BarsLeaks to the first VW home in the annual inter-club rally...