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View Full Version : shaper the size of a soda can, hand made



Elninio
02-21-2011, 07:21 PM
"Mike’s grandfather made the shaper and lathe strictly by hand. He hack-sawed all CRS material by hand. He drilled the holes with a hand drill. He didn't even have a drill press until he made one. He had a grinder that Mike’s uncle (a retired tool maker) used to crank so he could sharpen his drills."
http://www.neme-s.org/shapers/columns/shaper_column_44_files/wm_shaper_can_lf_400x72.jpg
source: http://www.neme-s.org/shapers/columns/shaper_column_44.html

x39
02-21-2011, 07:27 PM
Nice, that level of competence is rare. To accomplish a project like that with hand tools is pretty amazing.

Black_Moons
02-21-2011, 07:34 PM
Very cool, Amazing what people could (and Would) do back then. We have no paitence these days for such things. :(

gda
02-21-2011, 08:28 PM
How do we know that he did not make a giant model of a soda can?

ChuckB
02-21-2011, 08:34 PM
How do we know that he did not make a giant model of a soda can?

because of the wall outlet and base board :)

sasquatch
02-21-2011, 08:37 PM
WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Beautiful piece of work!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Thanks for posting this, a fascinating story.

Wonder whatever became of the little lathe and also the drill press??

Geez, such a talented guy being paid peanuts!!

Another amazing individual.

Elninio
02-21-2011, 08:40 PM
How do we know that he did not make a giant model of a soda can?
Because that means he must have made giant models of bridgeport mills, in his other pictures.
http://www.neme-s.org/shapers/columns/shaper_column_44_files/bpm_shaper_3_400x72.jpg

sasquatch
02-21-2011, 08:51 PM
For the non-believers,, check out the minature machines at Joe Martins "Craftsmanship Museum".

Black_Moons
02-21-2011, 08:51 PM
Attack of the 40 foot bridgeport.. Kinda has a nice ring to it.

Ken_Shea
02-21-2011, 08:54 PM
WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Beautiful piece of work!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Thanks for posting this, a fascinating story.

Wonder whatever became of the little lathe and also the drill press??

Geez, such a talented guy being paid peanuts!!

Another amazing individual.

Actually he was paid pretty well for it being 1945, minimum wage was .40 per hour, average manufacturing hourly wage was .95, he was paid $1.45


Amazing work that's for sure, as much as the ability is the patience required to do that with what he had to work with, quite a guy.

sasquatch
02-21-2011, 09:47 PM
Ken, Re: Wages,,, The point i made was in 1960 @$3.49 per hour, that was not a big wage for a master machinist, or anyone that talented.
That,s a Gross pay of $140.00 per week.
I realize areas differ greatly at times in pay scales, but a number of special talented people were making more than that in 1960.
However Walter was probably quite content at his job as many used to be and stayed there accumilating seniority. (Especially those who had gone through the great depression.)
Talented people such as Walter made their employers good money, sadly most were never compensated accordingly for their loyalty and devotion to their work to produce only the best.

x39
02-21-2011, 10:01 PM
Talented people such as Walter made their employers good money, sadly most were never compensated accordingly for their loyalty and devotion to their work to produce only the best.
How very true.

J. Randall
02-21-2011, 10:02 PM
Sasquatch, I have no idea where you live, or what experience you are drawing from, but I stocked groceries for 60 cents an hr. in 1964 and I would have thought anyone making over 3.50 was knocking down the big bucks. I had no idea what a machinist was at that time.
James

gwilson
02-21-2011, 10:08 PM
A great piece of work!!! I made $2.50 an hour when I started teaching in 1964.

When I was in college,I made $1.00 an hour,but heard about drafting students making $90.00 a week at the shipyard in Norfolk for Summer jobs.

Mad Scientist
02-21-2011, 10:08 PM
Very cool, Amazing what people could (and Would) do back then. We have no paitence these days for such things. :(
Well some still do!
From another (car) forum there is this guy in Switzerland who is building a car from scratch. A 1/12 scale model.
Each of the vanes on these hubcaps where individually cut and then soldered into precut grooves.

http://i68.photobucket.com/albums/i17/mscientist/hubcaps.jpg